Calhoun, the name of ten counties in the United States. I. A W. county of West Virginia, intersected by the Little Kanawha river and its W. fork; area, 300 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 2,939, of whom 8 were colored. The surface is hilly. The chief productions in 1870 were 5,382 bushels of wheat, 52,202 of Indian corn, and 8,357 of oats. There were 496 horses, 666 milch cows, 904 other cattle, 3,232 sheep, and 1,741 swine. Capital, Grants-ville. II A S. W. county of Georgia, intersected by the Ichawaynoochaway river and its tributaries, and Spring creek; area, 300 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 5,503, of whom 3,477 were colored. The surface is level, and the soil fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 101,-517 bushels of Indian corn, and 3,843 bales of cotton. There were 299 horses, 696 mules and asses, 870 milch cows, 2,344 other cattle, 1,304 sheep, and 3,946 swine. Capital, Morgan. III. A W. county of Florida, bordering on the gulf of Mexico, and bounded E. by the Appalachi-cola river; area, 464 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 998, of whom 244 were colored. It has a low surface. The chief productions in 1870 were 25,970 bushels of Indian corn, 13,950 of sweet potatoes, 178 bales of cotton, 6,237 lbs. of rice, 13,822 of tobacco, and 8,141 gallons of molasses.

There were 1,264 milch cows, 2,556 other cattle, 633 sheep, and 3,641 swine. Capital, Abe's Spring. IV. A N. E. county of Alabama, bounded W. by the Coosa river, and watered by its tributaries; pop. in 1870, 13,-980, of whom 3,892 were colored. The former area was 1,170 sq. m., but portions have been taken to form Cleburne and Etowah counties. The surface is uneven, and in some places mountainous. Chalybeate and other mineral springs are found in many places. Marble and limestone abound, and the ores, among which are gold, lead, and iron, are rich and plentiful. The Selma, Rome, and Dalton railroad passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 79,818 bushels of wheat, 238,451 of Indian corn, 29,030 of oats, and 3,038 bales of cotton. There were 1,186 horses, 986 mules and asses, 2,061 milch cows, 3,692 other cattle, 3,441 sheep, and 9,525 swine. Capital, Jacksonville. V. A N. county of Mississippi, intersected by the Looshascoona and Yallabusha rivers; area, about 800 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 10,561, of whom 2,000 were colored. The chief productions in 1870 were 6,119 bushels of wheat, 303,405 of Indian corn, 31,800 of sweet potatoes, 4,329 bales of cotton, and 127,180 lbs. of butter.

There were 1,820 horses, 1,153 mules and asses, 3,186 milch cows, 5,924 other cattle, 5,954 sheep, and 20,-945 swine. Capital, Pittsboro. VI. A S. E. county of Texas, including Matagorda island, bordering on the gulf of Mexico, bounded S. W. by Espiritu Santo bay and Guadalupe river, and N. E. by Matagorda and Lavacca bays; area, 684 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 3,443, of whom 907 were colored. The surface is generally level. The soil is not fertile, and there is little timber. The San Antonio and Mexican Gulf, and the Indianola railroads traverse it. The chief productions in 1870 were 4,165 bushels of Indian corn, 2,432 of sweet potatoes, 248 tons of hay, and 17,490 lbs. of wool. There were 927 horses, 12,931 cattle, and 2,119 sheep. Capital, Indianola. VII. A S. county of Arkansas, bounded S. W. by the Washita river, here navigable by steamboats, and E. by Moro river; area, about 600 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 3,853, of whom 1,100 were colored. S. E. of the main body of the county, at the junction of the Saline and Washita rivers, is a small portion separated from the rest by Bradley and Union counties. It has a level or rolling surface, and a good soil. The chief productions in 1870 were 102,705 bushels of Indian corn, 13,746 of sweet potatoes, and 2,593 bales of cotton.

There were 726 horses, 1,475 milch cows, 2,146 other cattle, 1,634 sheep, and 8,895 swine. Capital, Hampton. VIII. AS. W. county of Michigan, drained by St. Joseph's river and the head waters of the Kalamazoo; area, 720 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 36,569. It has a rich soil and an undulating surface, mostly occupied by a scattered growth of white and burr oak. Sandstone and water power are abundant. It is traversed by the Peninsular railroad, and by the air-line division of the Michigan Central. The chief productions in 1870 were 741,467 bushels of wheat, 739,832 of Indian corn, 304,872 of oats, 62,366 of barley, 389,738 of potatoes, 47,052 tons of hay, 824,058 lbs. of butter, and 449,651 of wool. There were 8,708 horses, 8,459 milch cows, 9,388 other cattle, 102,010 sheep, and 15,464 swine. Capital, Marshall. IX. A S. W. county of Illinois, occupying a narrow strip of land between the Mississippi and Illinois rivers, the former of which separates it from Missouri, and is joined by the latter at the S. E. angle of the county; area, 260 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 6,562. Near the river banks the surface is low and frequently inundated; in other localities are high bluffs and table land broken by ravines.

In the W. part are valuable coal field's. The chief productions in 1870 were 221,373 bushels of wheat, 234,041 of Indian corn, 26,234 of oats, and 29,980 of potatoes. There were 2,365 horses, 1,710 milch cows, 2,718 other cattle, 1,550 sheep, and 11,069 swine. Capital, Hardin. X. A W. county of Iowa; area, about 600 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 1,602. The S. and W. parts are drained by Coon river and its tributaries, and the S. fork of Lizard river intersects the N. E. corner. The Dubuque and Sioux City railroad passes through the N. E. part. The chief productions in 1870 were 36,589 bushels of Indian corn, 26,327 of wheat, 14,430 of oats, and 1,149 tons of hay. There were 378 horses, 317 milch cows, 1,060 other cattle, and 679 swine. Capital, Lake City.