Cartagena, Or Carthagcna (Anc. Carthago Nova, New Carthage), a seaport town of Spain, in the province and 29 m. S. S. E. of Murcia; lat. 37° 36' K, lon. 0° 56' W.; pop., including suburbs, about 60,000. It is built at the head of a deep, well sheltered harbor, flanked by steep hills, defended by works at its mouth, and forming one of the best ports on the Mediterranean. The town itself is walled and neatly built; the streets are wide, regular, and relieved by several public squares. It is the seat of a bishop, and has an old cathedral, of little beauty, and now a simple church. There are several other churches, convents, hospitals, an observatory, an artillery park, a splendid arsenal, barracks, dock yards, founderies, ropewalks, and a glass factory. Notwithstanding its commodious port, the town has little commerce. The inhabitants are employed chiefly in lead and silver mining, fishing, and exporting barilla, grain, and esparto. The mineral wealth of the neighborhood was known in very early times, and the yield of silver enabled Hannibal to carry on his war against the Romans. The mine of La Carmen was opened in 1839, and the veins have since been successfully worked by a joint stock company. - Cartagena was founded by Ilasdrubal, the Carthaginian general, about 230 B. C.; was taken by Scipio in 210, at which period, Livy states, it was one of the richest cities in the world; was almost destroyed by the Goths; rose to great importance in the time of Philip II., and became the great naval arsenal of Spain. It was formerly very unhealthy; but within a few years the draining of the Almajar, a lake formed by the rains, has remedied this, and its population has in consequence con-siderably increased.

Cartagena, Spain.

Cartagena, Spain.