Charterhouse (Fr. Chartreuse, a Carthusian convent), a celebrated modern school and charitable foundation for aged soldiers and merchants in the city of London. The site it occupies was bought for a public burial place, during the great plague of 1349, by Sir Walter Manny, who afterward established on it a convent of Carthusians. After the dissolution of the religious houses by Henry VIII. it passed through several hands, till at length it was bought by Thomas Sutton, who built a hospital and endowed the present foundation. The mastership of the Charterhouse is generally tilled by some distinguished scholar, and the school has the repute of being among the first classical schools of England. The establishment supports 42 boys as pupils, and 80 pensioners, who must be at least 50 years old. Each boy is educated at a certain expense, and each pensioner receives food, clothing, lodging, lire, and a stipend of money. The right of presentation to the Charterhouse is vested by rotation in the 16 governors of the hospital. Nine church livings are also in their immediate gift. Besides the scholars upon the foundation, there are usually 60 or 70 others who pay.

In 1872 extensive repairs and alterations were made in the buildings.

Charterhouse.

Charterhouse.