Chlamyphorus, Or Chlamydophoros, a name first given by Dr. Harlan to a small mammal, a native of Chili, which seems to form a connecting link between the edentates and the insectivora; it is placed, however, among the former, and by Gray near the armadillo; its native name is pichiciago. It is about 5 1/4 inches long, the top of the head, back, and hind quarters being covered with 24 rows of plates, of a consistence greater than that of leather; at the end of the body this covering is suddenly curved downward, so that the creature looks as if the body had been here chopped off; hence its name C. truncatus. The lower parts are covered with a soft fur, like that of the mole; the head is conical; molar teeth |; most of the ribs, as in birds, are united to the breast bone without cartilages; the tail is short, strong, curved beneath the body, and evidently used for removing backward the earth accumulated between the limbs during its burrowing; fore limbs strong and mole-like for digging. It lives under ground like the mole, feeding on worms and subterranean insects; the eyes are very small.

This curious animal resembles the mole in its form, subterranean habits, and fore limbs; it comes near the sloths in the teeth, near the armadillo in its covering and the general characters of the skeleton, and near the monotremata and birds in the breast bone, ribs, and open pelvis.

Chlamyphorus.

Chlamyphorus.