Coblentz (Ger. Collenz or Kollenz; anc. Confluentes), a fortified city of Prussia, capital of the province of the Rhine, at the confluence of the Rhine and Moselle, 49 m. S. E. of Colognc; pop. in 1871, exclusive of the garrison, 24,528. A Gothic freestone bridge of 14 arches, erected in the 14th century, crosses the Moselle; and one of boats, across the Rhine, leads to the fortress of Ehrenbreitstein, on the E. bank. There is also an iron railway bridge across the Rhine, built in 1866. The fortilications are constructed partly on the system of Vauban, partly on that of Montalembert, and are capable of accommodating 100,000 men, and the magazine will hold provisions for 8,000 men for ten years. Among the public buildings, the church of St. Castor is notable as the place where in 843 the grandsons of Charlemagne met to apportion the empire. An active trade is carried on in colonial produce, corn, iron, potters' clay, mineral waters, bark, and chiefly sparkling Rhine and Moselle wines. Manufactures also flourish to some extent. The city consists of the old and the new town, the latter being the more pleasant. The palace in the new town, a royal summer residence, is a fine structure, erected about 1780 by the last elector of Treves; it was for some time used by the French as a barrack.

The Protestant church has some fine specimens of early painted glass. The casino contains an elegant ball room and good reading rooms. There is a hospital conducted by the sisters of charity, and a town library, with valuable collections of coins, paintings, and antiquities. The environs of Coblentz embrace some of the finest scenery of the Rhine valley. During the French revolution the emigres made their headquarters at Coblentz; many of them settled permanently in the town, which consequently contains more infusion of French blood than perhaps any other Rhenish town. Prince Metternich, Prof, Gorres, and Henrietta Sontag were born in Coblentz.

Railway Bridge between Coblentz and Ehrenbreitstein.

Railway Bridge between Coblentz and Ehrenbreitstein.