A state of Mexico, between lat. 18° and 19° 30' N, and lon. 102° 40' and 104° 20' W., bounded K by Jalisco, E. and S. E. by Michoacan, and S. W. by the Pacific; area, 2,393 sq. m.; pop. in 1869, 48,649. It has a coast line of about 100 m. Its surface is generally level, no part of it, excepting a few mountain peaks, rising more than 1,000 ft. above the sea. The climate is very hot, and the soil produces largely. Coffee, tobacco, cotton, cacao, indigo, vanilla, various fruits, and the mulberry grow to perfection. The inhabitants are chiefly Indians. - The volcano of Colima, which is in the state of Jalisco, is 12,000 ft. high, and forms the S. W. extremity of the chain which traverses Mexico from E. to W. For 40 years it had been inactive, and was supposed to be extinct; but on July 12, 1869, it began to smoke, and a few weeks later to pour forth a stream of pumice stone intensely heated, which spread for miles and covered hundreds of acres. It was still in eruption in 1873.

Colima.

Colima.

II. The capital and principal city of the state, situated in a fertile plain watered by several rivers, two of which pass the town, in lat. 19° N., lon. 103° 7' W., 270 m. W. by S. of Mexico; pop. about 20,000. It is a well built city, with regular streets, mostly paved. There are two squares, the principal of which is the Plaza de Armas. It has a government house, a number of churches, a college, and several schools. There is a considerable demand for manufactured goods, cottons, linens, woollens, and hardware. Its port, Manzanilla, 60 m. S. by W. of the city, has line anchorage and a good commerce with San Francisco. There are no buildings there, it being only a landing place. Colima was founded by Gonzalo de Sandoval in 1522, incorporated under the name of Santiago de los Caballeros by Philip II., and made a city in 1824.