Dieppe, a seaport town of France, department of Seine-Inferieure (Normandy), on the English channel, at the mouth of the Arques, 52 m. E. N. E. of Havre, and 93 m. N. N. W. of Paris; pop. in 1866, 19,946. It extends a mile along the coast, has wide and regular streets, and its houses, mostly of one style, are of brick, two stories high, with balconies toward the street. The finest hotels and residences are near the harbor, on the main street, which runs parallel with the sea the whole length of the town. The most remarkable public edifices are the churches of St. Remi and St. Jacques. The latter, a large Gothic structure, commenced in the 13th century, and not completed till the 15th, is built entirely of stone brought from England. The former is in the mixed Gothic-Saracenic style. There is a commercial court, a chamber of commerce, and a school of navigation. Dieppe is well supplied with water by an aqueduct 3 m. long, cut in the solid rock, and has 08 public and numerous private fountains. The port, enclosed by two jetties, is spacious and secure, with a basin of sufficient depth for vessels of 1,200 tons, but the entrance is difficult. It has two suburbs, La Barre and Le Pollet, and is protected by an old castle and by some batteries.

Its manufactories of ivory are famous; and there are also sugar refineries, rope walks, paper mills, and ship yards. The manufacture of tobacco employs 1,200 hands. Fishing, however, occupies the attention of the greater portion of the inhabitants; from two oyster beds near the town about 12,000,000 oysters are annually sent to Paris. Dieppe is connected with Rouen, Paris, and Havre by rail, and by steamer with Newhaven, near Brighton, England. Its sea baths, with its pure air and picturesque situation, have made it the chief watering place of France. The principal bathing establishment combines reception rooms, ball, concert, and billiard rooms, and literary, social, and convivial saloons. In the early part of this century it became, under the patronage of the duchess de Berry, the rendezvous during the summer of the noblest families of France. Dieppe was founded in the10th century, and in less than four centuries it had become the rival of Rouen. It was bombarded by the English and Dutch in 1694. It was the first maritime town of France occupied by the Germans in the war of 1870.

Castle of Dieppe.

Castle of Dieppe.