Eisenach, a town of Germany, in the grand duchy of Saxe-Weimar, formerly capital of the principality of Saxe-Eisenach, 45 m. W. of Weimar; pop. in 1871,13,967. It is situated on the border of the Thuringian forest, at the confluence of the Horsel with the Nesse, 712 ft. above the sea, and is the chief station on the Thurin-gian-Saxon railway. The town is enclosed by a wall, has broad streets generally paved with basalt, and several remarkable public buildings, among which is the castle, formerly the residence of the princes of Eisenach. Its manufactures are chiefly woollen and cotton fabrics, white lead, and pipe heads of soap stone. In its environs on a lofty height is the ancient castle of Wartburg, once the residence of the landgraves of Thuringia, celebrated as the place where the minnesingers contended for the palm of poetry, and as the asylum where Luther composed his translation of the Bible. The " Evangelical church conferences," consisting of representatives of all the governments of Germany and of Austria, for the regulation of the Protestant church affairs of these states, have been held here biennially since 1852. - The ancient principality of Eisenach was in 1440 united with Saxony. Three times, in 1596,1640, and 1672, a special line of Saxe-Eisenach was founded, but each of them was of short duration; the last became extinct in 1741, when the country was united permanently with Saxe-Weimar.

The Wartburg, Eisenach.

The Wartburg, Eisenach.