Greenock , a parliamentary borough and seaport town of Renfrewshire, Scotland, on the S. shore of the estuary of the Clyde, 18 m. W. N W. of Glasgow; pop. in 1871, 57,138. It stands partly on a narrow plain, and partly on the declivity of a high hill. It has about 35 churches and chapels, a Latin school, a town library of 12,000 volumes, a mechanics' hall, excellent docks and wharves, and in the neighborhood an aqueduct 3 m. long. There are numerous sugar refineries and iron founderies, considerable ship building, in particular of iron ships, and manufactories of sail cloth, shoes, soap, and candles. The entrances at the port in 1871 were 64 steamers and 562 sailing vessels; the clearances, 22 steamers and 339 sailing vessels. The imports were valued at £6,-117,796 (from the United States, £53,453); the exports at £649,313 (to the United States, £63,521). All the steamers of the Clyde touch at this port. The Victoria dock, opened Oct. 17,1850, is a tidal basin covering an area of six acres, and exceeding 30 ft. in depth; it cost upward of £120,000. - Until 1697 Greenock was a small fishing village.

James Watt, the inventor of the steam engine, was a native of the town, and in 1838 a marble statue by Chantrey was erected to him here.

Greenock.

Greenock.