Halibut , a fish of the family planidoe and genus hippoglossus (Cuv.). The genus is characterized by a flat oblong body, compressed vertically; the eyes and colored surface are on the right side; the lips large and fleshy, the lower jaw the longer; both jaws and the pharynx armed with sharp and strong teeth, in some portions card-like. The common species (H. vulgaris, Cuv.) grows to a length of from 3 to 6 ft., varying in weight from 100 to 500 lbs.; a specimen is on record, taken on the coast of Maine, which weighed more than GOO lbs. The right side is of an almost uniform dark brown, and the left or under surface pure white; in rare instances, the eyes and the colored surface are on the left side. The dorsal fin arises over the anterior third of the eye, ending at the fleshy portion of the caudal fin; the pectorals arise just back of the operculum; the ventrals are small, beneath the base of the pectorals; the anal extends from the posterior half of the pectorals to near the tail. Of two apertures in front of the anal fin, the anterior is the anus, the posterior the urinary outlet.

It is found from the coast of New York to Greenland, and also on the northern shores of Europe; the Boston market is supplied principally from George's banks and Nantucket shoals; in summer it is caught by hook and line in shallow water, retiring to deeper in the winter; it is abundant in the bay of Fundy and in the waters of Nova Scotia. It is exceedingly voracious; its flesh is coarse and dry, but much esteemed by some, when boiled or fried; the fins are considered a delicacy; large quantities of the flesh, dried, salted, or smoked, are consumed by the Greenlanders and other northern nations. In the United States it sells for a higher price than cod; in England it is not much esteemed. - For the characters of this family, see Flounder.

Halibut (Hippoglossus vulgaris).

Halibut (Hippoglossus vulgaris).