Harrison , the name of eight counties in the United States. I. A N. W. county of West Virginia, drained by the W. fork of Monongahela river; area, 440 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 16,-714, of whom 655 were colored. It has a hilly surface and fertile soil, and abounds in timber, coal, and iron. The Parkersburg division of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 83,473 bushels of wheat, 327,261 of Indian corn, 56,183 of oats, 26,028 of potatoes, 45,662 of wool, 276,955 of butter, and 16,901 tons of hay. There were 5,040 horses, 4,906 milch cows, 15,855 other cattle, 15,812 sheep, and 8,951 swine; 1 manufactory of boots and shoes, 1 of iron castings, 2 of machinery, 5 tanneries, 5 currying establishments, 3 flour mills, and 5 saw mills. Capital, Clarksburg. H. A S. E. county of Mississippi, bordering on the gulf of Mexico, and drained by Biloxi and Wolf rivers and branches of the Pascagoula; area, 870 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 5,795, of whom 1,427 were colored. The surface is level and mostly covered with pine woods, and the soil is light and sandy. The New Orleans, Mobile, and Texas railroad passes through it.

The chief productions in 1870 were 9,345 bushels of Indian corn, 12,625 of sweet potatoes, and 98,750 lbs. of rice; value of live stock, $78,135. There were 16 saw mills. Capital, Mississippi City. III. A N. E. county of Texas, bordering on Louisiana, bounded N. by Big Cypress bayou and Caddo lake, and S. by Sabine river; area, 964 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 13,241, of whom 8,931 were colored. The surface is diversified by prairies and forests, and the soil is fertile. Coal and iron ore are found on the Sabine river, and there are several mineral springs. The Texas and Pacific railroad passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 233,-019 bushels of Indian corn, 23,004 of sweet potatoes, and 8,105 bales of cotton. There were 809 horses, 1,095 mules and asses, 2,396 milch cows, 3,953 other cattle, 2,463 sheep, and 8,269 swine. Capital, Marshall. IV. A N. E. county of Kentucky, drained by Licking river and its S. branch; area, 356 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 12,993, of whom 2,378 were colored. The surface is diversified by hills and tracts of rich rolling land, the soil is fertile and well adapted for grazing, and blue limestone is abundant. The Kentucky Central railroad passes through it.

The chief productions in 1870 were 61,669 bushels of wheat, 42,386 of rye, 719,315 of Indian corn, 85,914 of oats, 20,604 of potatoes, 281,704 lbs. of tobacco, 31,961 of wool, and 153,756 of butter. There were 5,966 horses, 1,924 mules and asses, 2,845 milch cows, 5,590 other cattle, 8,697 sheep, and 16,098 swine; 10 carriage factories, 1 woollen factory, 13 distilleries, 5 flour mills, and 2 saw mills. Capital, Cynthiana. V. An E. county of Ohio, drained by branches of the Ohio and Tuscarawas rivers; area, 420 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 18,682. It has a hilly surface and a rich soil. Limestone and iron are found. The Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, and St. Louis railroad and Cadiz branch traverse it. The chief productions in 1870 were 155,688 bushels of wheat, 588,216 of Indian corn, 283,959 of oats, 67,996 of potatoes, 820,615 lbs. of wool, 616,-628 of butter, and 31,652 tons of hay. There were 4,844 horses, 4,477 milch cows, 6,515 other cattle, 180,189 sheep, and 9,067 swine; 7 manufactories of carriages, 10 of clothing, 2 of woollen goods, 7 tanneries, 7 currying establishments, 2 planing mills, and 3 saw mills.

Capital, Cadiz. VI. A S. county of Indiana, separated from Kentucky by the Ohio river, and bounded W. by Blue river; area, 478 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 19,913. It has an uneven surface, broken by "knobs" and hills, and based partly on carboniferous limestone. It abounds in natural caverns, one of which, called Pitman's cave, extends more than 2 m. under ground. Near it is a remarkable spring 60 ft. in diameter, and several hundred ft. deep. The soil is mostly good. The chief productions in 1870 were 255,847 bushels of wheat, 507,072 of Indian corn, 171,700 of oats, 156,259 of potatoes, 37,403 lbs. of wool, 196,-377 of butter, and 7,212 tons of hay. There were 6,155 horses, 5,226 milch cows, 5,633 other cattle, 15,769 sheep, and 29,139 swine; 16 manufactories of barrels and casks, 6 of furniture, 1 of tin, copper, and sheet-iron ware, 15 flour mills and 12 saw mills. Capital, Cory-don. VII. A W. county of Iowa, separated from Nebraska by the Missouri, and crossed by Boyer and Soldier rivers and other streams; area, about 480 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 8,931. |

The surface is somewhat diversified, and the soil fertile. Timber is found along the streams. The Chicago and Northwestern and the Sioux City and Pacific railroads traverse it. The chief productions in 1870 were 194,591 bush-,els of wheat, 664,510 of Indian corn, 103,207 of oats, 42,167 of potatoes, 223,615 lbs. of butter, and 22,661 tons of hay. There were 3,451 horses, 4,202 milch cows, 7,027 other cattle, 5,222 sheep, and 9,274 swine; 2 flour mills, 4 saw mills, and 1 woollen factory. Capital, Magnolia. VIII. A 1ST. TV. county of Missouri, bordering on Iowa, and watered by affluents of Grand river; area, 754 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 14,635, of whom 10 were colored. It consists in large part of prairies, and has much fertile soil near the rivers. The chief productions in 1870 were 109,571 bushels of wheat, 756,607 of Indian corn, 210,521 of oats, 55,-400 of potatoes, 86,415 lbs. of wool, 20,075 of tobacco, 370,359 of butter, and 7,902 tons of hay. There were 7,781 horses, 5,989 milch cows, 12,308 other cattle, 31,609 sheep, and 31,393 swine; 2 flour mills, 7 saw mills, and 2 wool-carding and cloth-dressing establishments.

Capital, Bethany.