Harrow, Or Harrow-On-The-Hill a village of Middlesex, England, 10 m. N. W. of London; pop. in 1871, 10,867. It contains an ancient parish church having a lofty tower and spire, places of worship for Baptists and Methodists, and a free grammar school which was founded in 1571 by John Lyon, a wealthy yeoman of the parish. This school was originally intended for the gratuitous instruction of poor boys belonging to the parish of Harrow; but as the education is almost wholly classical, few boys belonging to the parish take advantage of it, and it is now principally attended by the sons of the nobility and gentry, and is in high repute. Among the celebrated men who have been educated there are Sir William Jones, Dr. Parr, Lord Byron, and Sir Robert Peel. Harrow school chapel has been much improved since 1856, a new aisle being added from funds subscribed by the masters and the parents of the pupils, and a beautiful chancel erected at the expense of the head master, Dr. Vaughan.

Harrow School.

Harrow School.