Hebron , (originally Kirjath Arba; Arab. El-Khulil), a city of Palestine, 18 m. S. of Jerusalem; pop. about 5,000. Most of the inhabitants are Moslems; about 50 families are Jews; there are no resident Christians. The city stands partly on the declivities of two hills and partly in the deep and narrow valley of Mamre. At the S. extremity of the town is a mosque, which, according to the Arabs, covers the cave of Machpelah, with the tombs of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and their wives. The architecture of this mosque plainly indicates its original use as a Christian church. Hebron figures in the history of Abraham, who bought Machpelah. It was taken by Caleb at the conquest of Palestine by the Hebrews, and became the residence of David in 1055 B. C. It was recovered from the Edomites by Judas Maecabaeus, and burned by the Romans under Vespasian. In A. D 1167 it became the seat of a Latin bishopric. It was taken by Saladin in 1187, and after an insurrection stormed by Ibrahim Pasha in 1834.

Hebron.

Hebron.