Johnson, the name of eleven counties in the United States. I. An E. central county of Georgia, bounded W. by the Oconee river, and drained by the Great Ohoopee; area, about 250 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 2,964, of whom 915 were colored. The surface is undulating. The chief productions in 1870 were 47,229 bushels of Indian corn, 7,168 of sweet potatoes, and 1,558 bales of cotton. There were 374 horses, 680 milch cows, 755 other cattle, 1,306 sheep, and 4,571 swine. Capital, Wrightsville. II. A N. E. county of Texas, bounded S. W. by Brazos river; area, 594 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 4,923, of whom 279 were colored. The surface is undulating; the soil is well adapted to wheat, and is generally fertile. * Prairie and timber lands are distributed in nearly equal quantities. The chief productions in 1870 were 5,694 bushels of wheat, 155,435 of Indian corn, 6,718 of oats, 7,297 of sweet potatoes, and 1,212 bales of cotton. There were 6,343 horses, 2,549 milch cows, 16,396 other cattle, 1,212 sheep, and 8,758 swine. Capital, Cleburn. III. A N. W. county of Arkansas, bounded S. by Arkansas river, which is here navigable by steamboats; area, 576 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 9,152, of whom 613 were colored. The surface is moderately uneven, and the soil is fertile, but not uniformly so.

The Little Rock and Fort Smith railroad passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 13,864 bushels of wheat, 275,185 of Indian corn, 21,159 of oats, 7,048 of Irish and 16,890 of sweet potatoes, 11,915 lbs. of tobacco, 70,493 of butter, and 4,489 bales of cotton. There were 3,341 horses, 2,958 milch cows, 4,708 other cattle, 3,135 sheep, and 18,906 swine. Capital, Clarksville. IV. The N. E. county of Tennessee, bordering on Virginia and North Carolina, and having the Alleghany mountains on its S. E. boundary; area, 300 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 5,852, of whom 418 were colored. It is watered by Watauga river and its branches. The surface is mountainous and thickly wooded, and the county is rich in iron. The chief productions in 1870 were 16,484 bushels of wheat, 13,397 of rye, 85,782 of Indian corn, 34,682 of oats, 10,671 of potatoes, 11,333 lbs. of wool, 72,041 of butter, and 1,513 tons of hay. There were 951 horses, 1,601 milch cows, 2,579 other cattle, 6,004 sheep, 5,271 swine, and 7 iron forges and rolling mills. Capital, Taylorsville. V. An E. county of Kentucky, traversed by the W. fork of Big Sandy river; area, 140 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 7,494, of whom 37 were colored. It abounds in sandstone and coal, and has a hilly surface with a sandy but fertile soil.

The chief productions in 1870 were 9,482 bushels of wheat, 256,256 of Indian corn, 30,310 of oats, 13,341 of potatoes, 14,481 lbs. of tobacco, 13,798 of wool, and 81,082 of butter. There were 1,129 horses, 1,537 milch cows, 1,088 working oxen, 2,352 other cattle, 8,105 sheep, and 9,277 swine. Capital, Paintville. VI. A central county of Indiana, watered by the W. fork of White river and several smaller streams; area, 320 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 18,366. The surface is moderately uneven, and the soil is chiefly a rich loam. The Jeffersonville, Madison, and Indianapolis and the Cincinnati and Martinsville railroads traverse it. The chief productions in 1870 were 544,917 bushels of wheat, 1,240,-221 of Indian corn, 50,392 of potatoes,45,363 lbs. of wool, 300,915 of butter, and 6,376 tons of hay. There were 6,319 horses, 4,279 milch cows, 8,233 other cattle, 13,775 sheep, and 30,006 swine; 2 manufactories of agricultural implements, 11 of brick, 13 of carriages, 3 of clothing, 7 of cooperage, 5 of brick and stone masonry, 8 of saddlery and harness, 1 of starch, 2 of woollen goods, 2 leather-currying establishments, 11 flour mills, 2 planing mills, and 14 saw mills.

Capital, Franklin. VII. A S. county of Illinois, drained by Cache river; area, 486 sq. m.; pop. in 1870,11,248. It has a level surface and a good soil. The chief productions in 1870 were 92,191 bushels of wheat, 343,298 of Indian corn, 74,525 of oats, 19,764 of Irish and 7,076 of sweet potatoes, 307,013 lbs. of tobacco, 21,663 of wool, 99,725 of butter, 2,327 tons of hay, and 33 bales of cotton. There were 2,247 horses, 926 mules and asses, 1,846 milch cows, 2,202 other cattle, 9,563 sheep, and 13,988 swine. Capital, Vienna. VIII. A S. E. county of Iowa, drained by Iowa river, which is navigable by small steamboats in the S. part; area, 324 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 24,898. The surface is moderately uneven and the soil remarkably fertile. The Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific railroad passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 503,141 bushels of wheat, 2,147,570 of Indian corn, 491,137 of oats, 104,889 of potatoes, 674,500 lbs. of flax, 69,796 of wool, 594,573 of butter, 32,962 of cheese, and 40,659 tons of hay.

There were 9,989 horses, 9,628 milch cows, 15,902 other cattle, 16,975 sheep, and 40,456 swine; 7 manufactories of carriages, 1 of linseed oil, 1 of wrapping paper, 5 of saddlery and harness, 5 of tin, copper, and sheet-iron ware, 2 of woollen goods, 3 breweries, 6 flour mills, 1 planing mill, and 4 saw mills. Capital, Iowa City. IX. A W. county of Missouri, drained by branches of Black river; area, 785 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 24,648, of whom 1,458 were colored. The surface is mostly prairie, diversified with large tracts of timber. The soil is generally good and suitable for pasturage, and there are rich beds of coal. The Pacific railroad of Missouri passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 462,990 bushels of wheat, 1,946,741 of Indian corn, 356,351 of oats, 106,731 of potatoes, 18,700 lbs. of tobacco, 43,256 of wool, 367,464 of butter, and 12,049 tons of hay. There were 9,732 horses, 2,137 mules and asses, 7,161 milch cows, 14,516 other cattle, 16,865 sheep, and 36,152 swine; 2 manufactories of agricultural implements, 5 of carriages, 1 of iron castings, 6 of saddlery and harness, 5 of tin, copper, and sheet-iron ware, 5 flour mills, and 3 saw mills.

Capital, Warrensburg. X. An E. county of Kansas, bordering on Missouri, and bounded N. W. by Kansas river; area, 472 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 13,684. It is watered by several streams, and has a fertile soil. The Kansas City and Santa Fe division of the Leavenworth, Lawrence, and Galveston railroad, and the Missouri River, Fort Scott, and Gulf line pass through the county. The chief productions in 1870 were 71,835 bushels of wheat, 1,074,186 of Indian corn, 335,056 of oats, 112,046 of potatoes, 219,358 lbs. of butter, 24,850 of cheese, and 16,399 tons of hay. There were 4,798 horses, 4,518 milch cows, 6,701 other cattle, 3,691 sheep, and 10,342 swine. Capital, Olathe. XI. A S. E. county of Nebraska, intersected by the Big Nemaha river, and drained by the S. fork of the Little Nemaha; area, about 375 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 3,429. It contains extensive fertile prairies, with good timber along the streams. Coal and limestone are abundant. The chief productions in 1870 were 81,454 bushels of wheat, 113,495 of Indian corn, 32,-914 of oats, 21,341 of potatoes, 58,107 lbs. of butter, and 4,545 tons of hay. There were 671 horses, 533 milch cows, 999 other cattle, and 1,442 swine.

Capital, Tecumseh.