I. A S. E. County Of Georgia

I. A S. E. County Of Georgia, bordering on the Atlantic, and partly bounded on the S. W. by the Altamaha river; area, 660 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 7,688, of whom 5,260 were colored. The surface is level, and the soil fertile. The Atlantic and Gulf railroad passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 131,845 bushels of Indian corn, 58,096 of oats, 23,012 of peas and beans, 95,-325 of sweet potatoes, 2,090 bales of cotton, and 1,219,430 lbs. of rice. There were 1,078 horses, 5,026 milch cows, 10,307 other cattle, 3,073 sheep, and 14,808 swine. Capital, Hines-ville.

II. A N. W. County Of Florida

II. A N. W. County Of Florida, lying between the Ockloconee river on the E. and the Appalachicola on the W.; area, 900 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 1,050, of whom 323 were colored. The surface is level, and the soil sandy. The chief productions in 1870 were 10,865 bushels of Indian corn, 11,675 of sweet potatoes, 120 bales of cotton, 11 hogsheads of sugar, 5,418 gallons of molasses, and 13,660 lbs. of rice. There were 70 horses, 670 milch cows, 2,333 other cattle, 940 sheep, and 2,472 swine. Capitol, Bristol.

III. A S. E. County Of Texas

III. A S. E. County Of Texas, bounded S. "W. by Galveston bay and the San Jacinto river, and intersected by the Trinity; area, 1,600 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 4,414, of whom 1,975 were colored. The surface is about equally divided between timber and prairie land. The soil along the Trinity is very fertile; elsewhere it is generally light and sandy. Stock raising is the chief pursuit. The Texas and New Orleans railroad traverses it. The chief productions in 1870 were 98,087 bushels of Indian corn, 21,896 of sweet potatoes, 1,881 bales of cotton, 9 hogsheads of sugar, 1,663 gallons of molasses, and 7,775 lbs. of rice. There were 2,190 horses, 2,706 milch cows, 24,315 other cattle, 1,458 sheep, and 7,344 swine. Capital, Liberty.

Liberty #1

Liberty, a town and the capital of Clay co., Missouri, on the Kansas City division of the Hannibal and St. Joseph railroad, 3 m. 1ST. of the Missouri river, and 13 m. N. E. of Kansas City; pop. in 1870, 1,700, of whom 342 were colored. It occupies a healthy site, and is surrounded by a rich farming district abounding in coal and limestone. It contains a machine shop, two woollen factories, two savings banks, a weekly newspaper, several schools, and six churches. It is the seat of Liberty female college, and of William Jewell college, both under the control of the Baptists. The latter institution was organized in 1848, and has a theological department. In 1873-'4 the whole number of professors was 9; of students, 127; volumes in library, 3,000.