Liegnitz, a town of Prussia, capital of a district of the same name in the province of Silesia, on the Katzbach, and on the Silesian and Saxon railway, 37 m. W. N. W. of Breslau and 147 m. S. E. of Berlin; pop. in 1871, 23,-124. It is an old but well built and handsome town, with five suburbs, and is surrounded by a boulevard planted with trees. It contains seven churches, a synagogue, the Bitter academy (a school for nobles), several hospitals, a public library, a gymnasium, industrial and other schools, and a deaf and dumb institution. The Schloss or castle, a part of which dates from the 15th century, is now a museum of art and industry. In the Furstencapelle are the monuments of many of the dukes of the Polish Piast family, who down to 1675 ruled the territory of Liegnitz. The manufactures include table linen, hosiery, hats, tobacco, etc. There are extensive vegetable gardens in the suburbs and surroundings. - Frederick the Great won here a victory over the Austrians on Aug. 15, 1760. The neighboring field of Wahlstatt witnessed the great battle of April 9, 1241, against the Mongols, and that of Aug. 26, 1813, in which Blucher defeated the French (battle of the Katzbach). The title of princess of Liegnitz was conferred by Frederick William III. of Prussia upon the countess Augustc von Harrach, with whom he contracted a morganatic marriage in 1824.

View in Liegnitz.

View in Liegnitz.