Marion, the name of 17 counties in the United States.

I. A X. County Of West Virginia

A X. County Of West Virginia, drained by the Monongahela and its branches; area, 275 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 12,107, of whom 78 were colored. It has an undulating surface with considerable woodland, and a fertile soil. Coal and iron ore abound. The Baltimore and Ohio railroad intersects it. The chief productions in 1870 were 26,538 bushels of wheat, 63,643 of Indian corn, 29,819 of oats, 12,780 lbs. of wool, 22,927 of butter, and 3,780 tons of hay. There were 907 horses, 1,110 milch cows, 2,377 other cattle, 4,924 sheep. and 508 swine. Capital, Fairmont.

II. An E. County Of South Carolina

An E. County Of South Carolina, bordering on North Carolina, bounded E. by Little Pe-dee and Lumber rivers, and S. by the Great Pedee and Lynches creek; the Little and Great Pedee also intersect it; area, 1,200 sq. m pop. in 1870, 22,160, of whom 10,732 were colored. 'I he Wilmington, Columbia, and Augusta railroad traverses it. The surface is lev-el and the soil moderately fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 190,326 bushels of Indian corn. 11.412 of oats, 58,103 of sweet potatoes, 12,450 of peas and beans, 6,910 bales of cotton, and 415,382 lbs. of rice. There were 1,419 horses, 957 mules and asses, 3,633 milch cows, 5,468 other cattle, 4,420 sheep and 19521 swine. Capital. Marion Court House.

III. A W. County Of Georgia

A W. County Of Georgia, drained by tributaries of the Chattahoochee and Flint rivers-arejv 432 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 8,000, of whom 3,830 were colored. The surface is undulating and the soil generally fertile. A branch of the Southwestern railroad passes through the N. W. corner. The chief productions in 1870 were 9,523 bushels of wheat, 163,298 of Indian corn, 20,967 of sweet potatoes, 15,050 lbs. of butter, 5,439 bales of cotton, and 5,330 gallons of molasses. There were 514 horses, 1,002 mules and asses, 1,404 milch cows, 2,480 other cattle, 1,260 sheep, and 7,448 swine. Capital, Buena Vista.

IV. A Central County Of The Peninsula Of Florida

A Central County Of The Peninsula Of Florida, intersected by the Ocklawa-ha river, and partly bounded S. by the With-lacoochee; area, 1,760 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 10,804, of whom 7,878 were colored. The surface is level and the soil fertile, There are numerous lakes, of which the largest are Orange, Bryant, and Ware. The chief productions in 1870 were 129,596 bushels of Indian corn, 3,355 of oats, 23,968 of sweet potatoes, and 3,858 bales of cotton. There were 637 horses, 906 mules and asses, 3,035 milch cows, 306 working oxen, 458 other cattle, 442 sheep, and 3,488 swine. Capital, Ocala.

V. A N. W. County Of Alabama

A N. W. County Of Alabama, bordering on Mississippi, drained by branches of the Tennessee and Tombigbee rivers; area, about 700 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 6,059, of whom 224 were colored. The surface is uneven and the soil generally fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 5,108 bushels of wheat, 90,429 of Indian corn, 15,546 of sweet potatoes, 1,010 lbs. of tobacco, 9,691 of wool, 25,335 of butter, and 463 bales of cotton. There were 662 horses, 1,269 milch cows, 665 working oxen, 1,707 other cattle, 2,-999 sheep, and 5,765 swine. Capital, Pikeville.

VI. A S. County Of Mississippi

A S. County Of Mississippi, bordering on Louisiana, and drained by Pearl river; area, 1,224 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 4,211, of whom 1,649 were colored. It has an undulating surface and a fertile soil on the borders of the streams. The chief productions in 1870 were 69,691 bushels of Indian corn, 22,268 of sweet potatoes, 4,949 gallons of molasses, 793 bales of cotton, and 32,038 lbs. of rice. There were 797 horses, 2,206 milch cows, 4,637 other cat-cle, 4,827 sheep, and 8,574 swine. Capital, Columbia.

VII. A N. E. County Of Texas

A N. E. County Of Texas, bordering on Louisiana, and bounded S. by Big Cypress bayou and several lakes, which with Red river afford navigation to New Orleans; area, 320 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 8,562, of whom 4,362 were colored. The bottom lands are very fertile. It has an abundance of timber of all kinds, and iron ore of superior quality; and there are seven mineral springs. The chief productions in 1870 were 73,118 bushels of Indian corn, and 8,845 of sweet potatoes. There were 362 horses, 943 milch cows, 2,363 other cattle, and 3,241 swine. Capital, Jefferson.

VIII. A N. County Of Arkansas

A N. County Of Arkansas, bordering on Missouri, drained by White river and its branches; area, 900 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 3,979, of whom 19 were colored. It contains lead ore, and a variegated marble is found in the W. part. The chief productions in 1870 were 12,822 bushels of wheat, 115,160 of Indian corn, 302 bales of cotton, 19,361 lbs. of tobacco, 39,024 of butter, and 4,720 gallons of sorghum molasses. There were 845 horses, 849 milch cows, 1,763 other cattle, 2,283 sheep, and 7,952 swine. Capital, Yellville.

IX. A S. County Of Tennessee

A S. County Of Tennessee, bordering on Alabama, partly bounded S. E. by the Tennessee, and intersected by the Little Sequatchie river; area, 600 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 6,841, of whom 915 were colored. The surface is hilly and broken, being traversed by ridges of the Cumberland mountains. The Jasper branch of the Chattanooga railroad terminates at the county seat. The chief productions in 1870 were 28,134 bushels of wheat, 265,100 of Indian corn, 27,989 of oats, 7,504 of Irish and 10,662 of sweet potatoes, 17,487 lbs. of tobacco, 9,157 of wool, 64,742 of butter, and 724 bales of cotton. There were 1,571 horses, 1,977 milch cows, 4,289 other cattle, 5,605 sheep, and 17,020 swine. Capital, Jasper.

X. A Central County Of Kentucky

A Central County Of Kentucky, drained by the Rolling fork of Salt river; area, 304 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 12,838, of whom 3,343 were colored. The surface is hilly and the soil generally fertile. The Knoxville branch of the Louisville, Nashville, and Great Southern railroad passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 93,530 bushels of wheat, 395,170 of Indian corn, 72,812 of oats, 16,676 of potatoes, 132,293 lbs. of tobacco, 22,102 of wool, 193,397 of butter, and 3,274 tons of hay. There were 3,398 horses, 1,138 mules and asses, 2,070 milch cows, 4,042 other cattle, 7,578 sheep, and 22,460 swine; 3 manufactories of agricultural implements, 5 of carriages and wagons, 4 of saddlery and harness, 1 woollen factory, 5 distilleries, 2 tanneries, 2 flour mills, 5 saw mills, and 2 planing mills. Capital, Lebanon.

XI. A Central County Of Ohio

A Central County Of Ohio, drained by the Scioto, Little Scioto, and Whetstone or Olentangy rivers; area, 384 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 16,184. It has a level surface and fertile soil. It is intersected by the Atlantic and Great Western and the Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, and Indianapolis railroads. The chief productions in 1870 were 285,019 bushels of wheat, 635,291 of Indian corn, 196,639 of oats, 53,720 of potatoes, 702,090 lbs. of flax, 337,617 of wool, 439,226 of butter, and 29,062 tons of hay. There were 6,715 horses, 4,897 milch cows, 9,160 other cattle, 89,616 sheep, and 16,800 swine; 2 manufactories of agricultural implements, 15 of carriages and wagons, 1 of machinery, 3 of furniture, 4 tanning and currying establishments, 15 saw mills, and 3 flour mills. Capital, Marion.

XII. A Central County Of Indiana

A Central County Of Indiana, drained by the West fork White river; area, 360 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 71,939. It has a nearly level surface and fertile soil. A number of railroads concentrate at the county seat. The chief productions in 1870 were 613,267 bushels of wheat, 1,305,988 of Indian corn, 78,246 of oats, 220,885 of potatoes, 37,439 lbs. of wool, 378,963 of butter, and 17,464 tons of hay. There were 7,483 horses, 6,424 milch cows, 7,705 other cattle, 13 173 sheep, and 27,989 swine. The total number of manufacturing establishments was 740 having a capital of $8,303,185 and an annual product of $16,642,105. The principal products were leather, boots and shoes, bricks, carriages, cars, clothing, cooperage, cotton and woollen goods, furniture, iron and hardware, machinery, paper, saddlery and harness, tobacco and cigars, varnish, planed lumber, flour, and pork. Capital, Indianapolis, which is also the capital of the state.

XIII. A S. Central County Of Illinois

A S. Central County Of Illinois, drained by Skillett fork of Little Wabash river; area, 579 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 20,622. It has an undulating surface and fertile soil. The Illinois Central and the Ohio and Mississippi railroads intersect it. The chief productions in 1870 were 173,652 bushels of wheat, 1,034,057 of Indian corn, 389,446 of oats, 37,689 of potatoes, 40,285 lbs. of wool, 81,014 of butter, and 21,242 .tons of hay. There were 6,605 horses, 4,457 milch cows, 7,027 other cattle, 14,511 sheep, and 21. swine; 18 manufactories of carriages, 10 of saddlery and harness, 6 of tin, copper, and sheet-iron ware, 3 of machinery, 9 saw mills, and 11 flour mills. Capital, Salem.

XIV. A S. Central County Of Iowa

A S. Central County Of Iowa, intersected by the Des Moines river; area, 576 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 24,436. The surface is undulating, with much prairie, and the soil fertile. The Des Moines Valley railroad passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 374.414 bushels of wheat, 2,110.900 of Indian corn, 189,331 of oats, 152,763 of potatoes. 88,820 lbs. of wool, 499,153 of butter, and 21,522 tons of hay. There were 8,975 horses, 7,162 milch cow.-. 12,322 other cattle, 29,074 sheep, and 41. swine; 5 manufactories of carriages and wagons, 2 of woollen goods, 2 flour mills, and 6 saw mills. Capital, Knoxville.

XV. A N. E. County Of Missouri

A N. E. County Of Missouri, separated by the Mississippi from Illinois, and drained by North and South Fabius and North Two and South Two rivers; area, 425 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 23,780, of whom 3,592 were colored. It has an undulating surface, mostly prairie, and a very fertile soil. It is traversed by the Hannibal and St. Joseph, the Quincy, Missouri, and Pacific, and the Toledo, Wabash, and Western railroads. The chief productions in 1870 were 230,822 bushels of wheat, 805,256 of Indian corn, 168,715 of oats, 25,936 of potatoes, 83,488 lbs. of tobacco, 41,481 of wool, 22,700 of butter, and 10,212 tons of hay. There were 6,340 horses, 1.145 mules and asses, 4,306 milch cows, 9,130 Other cattle, 14,976sheep, and20,019 swine; 1 manufactory of railroad cars, 2 of machinery, 2 tobacco, 1 of woollen goods, 2 iron founderies, 4 breweries, 11 saw mills, and 4 flour mills. Capital, Palmyra.

XVI. An E. Central County Of Kansas

An E. Central County Of Kansas, watered by Cottonwood river; area. 1 044 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 768. It is traversed by the Atchison, Topeka, and Sante Fe railroad. The surface is undulating and the soil fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 7 722 bushels of wheat, 20,827 of Indian corn, 1,879 of oats, 1,814 of potatoes, 12,745 lbs. of butter, and 3,555 tons of hay. There were 407 horses, 537 milch cows, 2,831 other cattle, 485 sheep, and 291 swine. Capital, Marion Centre.

XVII. A X. W. County Of Oregon

A X. W. County Of Oregon, bounded \V. by the Willamette river, and watered by the X. Santiam and other streams; ana, 2,900 sq. in.; pop. in 1870, 9,965, of whom 127 were Chinese. The E. part is mountainous, bordering on the Cascade range, and here are extensive forests and deposits of gold, silver, coal, and iron; further W. the surface is hilly, while the S. W. portion is a broad and level prairie, with a fertile soil. It is traversed by the Oregon and California railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 232,091 bushels of wheat. 104.087 of oats, 37,464 of potatoes, 51,169 lbs. of wool, 70,838 of butter, and 3,405 tons of hay. There were 1.707 horses, 1,830 milch cows, 2,133 other cattle, 12,760 sheep, and6,458 swine; 3 manufactories of furniture, 1 of linseed oil, 2 of sash, doors, and blinds, 2 of woollen goods, 6 Hour mill-, and 5 saw mills. Capital, Salem, which is also the capital of the state.

Marion #1

Marion, a town and the capital of Perry co., Alabama, on the Selma, Marion, and Memphis railroad. 60 in. W. by N. of Montgomery; pop. in 1870, 2,646, of whom 1,455 were colored. It has a savings, insurance, and trust company, two weekly newspapers, and a monthly periodical published by the college students, and is the seat of three institutions of learning: Howard college (Baptist), founded in 1837; Judson female institute (Baptist), and Marion female seminary, institutions of collegiate grade founded in 1836. The college has a theological department, and in 1873-4 had 6 professors, 148 students (40 preparatory, 96 collegiate, and 12 theological), and a library of 1,000 volumes; Judson institute, 12 instructor-, 133 students (24 preparatory and 109 collegiate), and a library of 3,000 volumes; Marion seminary, 8 instructors, 127 students (25 preparatory and 102 collegiate), and a library of 1,000 volumes.