Marshall, the name of nine counties in the United States.

I. A X. County Of West Virginia

A X. County Of West Virginia, forming the base of the "Panhandle" between Ohio and Pennsylvania, and bordered on the W. by the Ohio river; area, 230 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 14,941, of whom 120 were colored. It has a hilly surface and fertile soil. The Baltimore and Ohio railroad passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 131,-638 bushels of wheat. 364,743 of Indian corn, 211,602 of oats. 54.781 of potatoes, 119,579 lbs of wool, 204.480 of butter, and 5,750 tons of hay. There were 3,109 horses, 3,076 milch cows, 3,881 other cattle, 37,508 sheep, and 10,-968 swme. Capital, Moundsville. H. A N. E. comity of Alabama, intersected by the Tennessee river, and drained by its branches and the head waters of the Black Warrior; area about 450 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 9.871, of whom 1,361 were colored. The surface is mountainous, being traversed by ridges of the Appalachian system, and the soil is generally fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 17-228 bushels of wheat, 187.491 of Indian corn 67,116 of sweet potatoes, 5,477 lbs. of tobacco 47,995 of butter, and 2,340 bales of cotton. There were 1,669 horses, 2,614 milch cows, 1,215 working oxen, 3,366 other cattle, 5,343 sheep, and 12,597 swine.

Capital, Warren-ton.

III. A N. County Of Mississippi

A N. County Of Mississippi, bordering on Tennessee, drained by the Tallahatchie, Tippah, and Coldwater rivers; area, 750 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 29,416, of whom 16,499 were colored. It has an undulating surface and fertile soil. The Mississippi Central railroad intersects it. The chief productions in 1870 were 19,121 bushels of wheat, 765,466 of Indian corn, 29,111 of sweet potatoes, 81,350 lbs. of butter, and 18,379 bales of cotton. There were 2,809 horses, 4,058 mules and asses, 5,885 milch cows, 8,991 other cattle, 4,719 sheep, and 37,157 swine. Capital, Holly Springs.

IV. A Central County Of Tennessee

A Central County Of Tennessee, intersected by Duck river; area, about 350 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 16,207, of whom 4,3S5 were colored. It has a diversified surface and a generally fertile soil. The chief productions in 1870 were 126,-633 bushels of wheat, 591,358 of Indian corn, 83,691 of oats, 16,182 of Irish and 16,556 of sweet potatoes, 12,788 lbs. of tobacco, 34,553 of wool, 170,658 of butter, and 2,063 bales of cotton. There were 6,202 horses, 2,598 mules and asses, 3,881 milch cows, 5,274 other cattle, 16,218 sheep, and 32,038 swine. Capital, Lew-isburg.

V. A W. County Of Kentucky

A W. County Of Kentucky, bounded X. and E. by the Tennessee river and intersected by Clarke's river; area,'about 350 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 9,455, of whom 385 were colored. It has an undulating surface and fertile soil. The Elizabeth and Paducah railroad passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 40,708 bushels of wheat, 478,241 of Indian corn, 38,346 of oats, 16,891 of Irish and 19,598 of sweet potatoes, 1,416,282 lbs. of tobacco, 16,786 of wool, 138,881 of butter, and 90 bales of cotton. There were 1,331 horses, 1,019 mules and asses, 2.187 milch cows, 2,716 other cattle, 10,552 sheep, and 23,927 swine. Capital, Benton.

VI. A N. County Of Indiana

A N. County Of Indiana, drained by the Yellow and Tippecanoe rivers; area, 440 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 20,211. It has a level surface and fertile soil. Iron ore abounds. The Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne, and Chicago, and the Indianapolis, Peru, and Chicago railroads intersect it. The chief productions in 1870 were 319,798 bushels of wheat, 193,005 of Indian corn, 50,534 of oats, 84,-994 of potatoes, 39,526 lbs. of wool, 243,583 of butter, and 13,689 tons of hay. There were 5,166 horses, 4,987 milch cows, 5,493 other cattle, 15,216 sheep, and 14,416 swine; 5 manufactories of hubs and wagon material, 2 of carriages, 2 of wooden goods, 1 brewery, 7 flour mills, 3 planing mills, and 42 saw mills. Capital, Plymouth.

VII. A N. Central County Of Illinois

A N. Central County Of Illinois, intersected by the Illinois river; area, 445 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 16,956. It has an almost level surface and a fertile soil. The Peoria branch of the Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific railroad intersects it, and the Illinois Central skirts the E. border. The chief productions in 1870 were 107,029 bushels of wheat, 36,135 of rye, 1,122,903 of Indian corn, 362,604 of oats, 98,236 of potatoes, 20,819 lbs. of wool, 290,077 of butter, and 21,445 tons of hay. There were 9,798 horses, 5,533 milch cows, 6,904 other cattle, 5,517 sheep, and 20,-098 swine; 2 manufactories of agricultural implements, 13 of carriages, 4 of cooperage, 11 of saddlery and harness, 9 of tin, copper, and sheet-iron ware, 1 of woollen goods, 1 pork-packing establishment, 2 distilleries, and 4 flour mills. Capital, Lacon.

VIII. A Central County Of Iowa

A Central County Of Iowa, intersected by Iowa river; area, 576 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 17,576. The surface is undulating and the soil fertile. It is intersected by the Chicago and Northwestern and the Central railroad of Iowa. The chief productions in 1870 were 922,560 bushels of wheat, 1,239,631 of Indian corn, 308,671 of oats, 99,-881 of potatoes, 20,934 lbs. of wool, 405,972 of butter, and 25,439 tons of hay. There were 7,494 horses, 5,219 milch cows, 7,892 other cattle, 3,952 sheep, and 21,537 swine; 3 manufactories of carriages and wagons, 1 of lime, 2 of machinery, 8 of saddlery and harness, 2 breweries, 4 saw mills, and 6 flour mills. Capital, Marshalltown.

IX. A N. E. County Of Kansas

A N. E. County Of Kansas, bordering on Nebraska, and drained by the Big Blue river; area, 908 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 6,901. It is intersected by the St. Joseph and Denver City railroad, and by the Central branch of the Union Pacific. The surface is somewhat diversified and the soil fertile. Coal and gypsum abound. The chief productions in 1870 were 160,750 bushels of wheat, 333,505 of Indian corn, 45,476 of oats, 42,488 of potatoes, 125,303 lbs. of butter, and 12,885 tons of hay. There were 2.534 horses, 3,025 milch cows, 4,383 other cattle, 2,379 sheep, and 2,909 swine; 3 flour mills, 2 saw mills, and 4 manufactories of saddlery and harness. Capital, Marysville.

Marshall #1

Marshall, a city and the county seat of Calhoun co., Michigan, situated on the Kalamazoo river and the Michigan Central railroad, 40 m. S. W. of Lansing, and 100 m. W. of Detroit; pop. in 1870, 4,925. It is surrounded by a fertile country, and has an important trade in agricultural products. There are several flour mills. saw mills, planing mills, manufactories and machine shops. Marshall has three national banks, with a capital of $450,000; graded public schools, including a high school; two weekly newspapers, and 10 churches. It was laid out in 1831, and incorporated as a city in 1859.