Medlar, a fruit-bearing tree of the order rosacea, common in the wild state in most parts of Europe, some of the finer varieties of which are cultivated. In most works the medlar is placed in a separate genus as mespi-lm Germanica, but Hooker and Bcntham in their new Genera Plantarum unite it with pyrus, from which it only differs botanically in having hard and bony carpels to the fruit. The medlar is a large shrub or small tree, usually with very crooked branches, simple leaves, and flowers resembling those of the pear; the fruit in the cultivated kinds is about 1 1/2 in. in diameter and broader than long; at the top of the fruit is a broad hairy disk, surrounded by the calyx lobes, which remain green and leafy until the fruit is nearly mature; when ripe the skin of the fruit is brown, and the flesh firm and austere; the fruit is only eatable after having been kept until the first stage of decay, called bletting, has thoroughly softened the flesh to a pulp; in this state the medlar is highly prized by some, who are fond of its rich subacid flavor, but it is not regarded as a popular fruit, Of the varieties, that called the large Dutch is preferred; the trees are propagated by grafting upon seedling medlars or upon the pear and thorn.

The plant has been used for hedges, and it is sometimes set as an ornamental tree where the effect of rusticity is desired. It is very seldom cultivated in this country. - The Japan medlar (eriohotrya Japonica of most authors, but by Hooker and Bentham reduced to Photinia), also known by the Chinese name of loquat, is a favorite ornamental tree in our warmer states. It is largely cultivated in Japan and China, and was introduced into Europe nearly a century ago. In its native country it forms a large tree; its large evergreen leaves are rough, bright green above, and downy beneath; the flowers, produced in autumn, are in large terminal spikes, and pleasantly fragrant; the fruit, which ripens the following spring, is of the size of a small apple, oval, pale orange with a blush of red, and an orange-colored subacid pulp resembling an apple in flavor. The tree does not produce fruit in the north of Georgia, but has done so in Louisiana; wherever it will endure the winter, it is a valuable tree both on account of its handsome foliage and its late season of blooming.

Medlar.

Medlar.