Montgomery, the name of counties in 18 of the United States.

I. An E. County Of New York

An E. County Of New York, intersected by the Mohawk river, which is here joined by the Schoharie and other smaller streams; area, 356 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 34,457. It has a fertile soil, especially in the valley of the Mohawk. The Erie canal and the New York Central railroad pass through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 61,659 bushels of wheat, 175,654 of Indian corn, 662,-516 of oats, 86,605 of barlev, 100,769 of buckwheat, 194,041 of potatoes, 717,277 lbs. of hops, 58,847 of wool, 1,174,822 of butter, 1,514,482 of cheese, 21,770 bushels of peas and beans, and 104,839 tons of hay. There were 7,606 horses, 26,317 milch cows, 8,557 other cattle, 12,84 sheep, and 6,773 swine; 2 manufactories of agricultural implements, 10 of brooms and brushes, 1 of carpets, 21 of cheese, 9 of hosiery, 1 of forged and rolled iron, 6 of iron castings, 3 of malt, 1 of linseed oil, 1 of washing machines, 1 of woollen goods, 10 tanneries, 16 saw mills, and 13 flour mills. Capital, Fonda. H. A S. E. county of Pennsylvania, bounded S. W. by the Schuylkill river; area, 450 sq. m.: pop. in 1870,81,612. The surface is undulating and the soil is rich, especially along the Schuylkill. It is intersected by the Philadelphia, Germantown, and Norristown, the Philadelphia and Reading, the Northern Pennsylvania, and other railroads.

The chief productions in 1870 were 340,911 bushels of wheat. 150,158 of rye, 1,026,865 of Indian corn, 791,272 of oats. 456,345 of potatoes, 3,104,748 lbs. of butter, 195,057 of cheese, and 112,287 tons of hay. There were 13,281 horses, 31,179 milch cow-.6,687 other cattle, 3,623 sheep, and 18.931 swine; 11 manufactories of agricultural implements, 20 of brick, 54 of carriages and wagons, 1 of coal oil, 8 of cotton goods, 12 of furniture, 10 of forged and rolled iron. 3 of nails and spikes, 6 of pig iron and 6 of cast-ings, 19 of lime, 6 of machinery, 2 of linseed oil, 8 of stone and earthen ware, 46 of turned and carved wood, 22 of woollen goods, 15 tanning and currying establishments, 44 flour mills, and 13 saw mills. Capital, Norristown.

III. A Central County Of Maryland

A Central County Of Maryland, bounded N. E. by the Patuxent, and S. W. by the Potomac river; area, 440 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 20,563, of whom 7,434 were colored. The surface is moderately uneven; the soil is fertile along the banks of the rivers. It is traversed by the Metropolitan branch of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, and the Chesapeake and Ohio canal passes along the S. W. border. The chief productions in 1870 were 309,418 bushels of wheat. 25.2:; 1 of rye, 638,047 of Indian corn, 171,242 of oats, 179,562 of potatoes, 630,000 lbs. of tobacco, 17,880 of wool, 188,334 of butter, and 12,735 tons of hay. There were 5,211 horses, 4,691 milch cows, 5,448 other cattle, 6,812 sheep, and 13,267 swine. Capital Rockville.

IV. A S. W. County Of Virginia

A S. W. County Of Virginia, bounded. by New river and drained by the bead waters of Staunton river; area 490 sq m.: pop. in 1870, 12,556, of whom 2,882 were colored. The surface is mountainous and the soil generally rocky, but productive near the rivers. The Atlantic, Mississippi, and Ohio railroad parses through it. The chief pro-ductions in 1870 were 100,761 bushels of wheat, 16,252 of rye, 146,723 of Indian corn, 78,168 of oats, 2,273 of potatoes, 204,747 lbs. of tobacco, 13,737 of wood, 159,212 of butter, and 4,106: tons of bay. There were 1,867 horses, 2,240 milch cows, 4,633 other cattle 4,966 sheep, and k,089 swine. Capital Chris tiansburg.

V. A S. County Of North Carolina

A S. County Of North Carolina, bounded W.by Yadkin river, and drained bv its branches; area, 500 sq. m.; pop. in 1870 7,487, of whom 2,128 were colored. The sirface in the west is hilly, and much of the soil is fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 50,478 bushels of wheat, 118,589 of Indian corn, 39,177 of oats, 22,155 of sweet potatoes, 13,992 lbs. of tobacco, 23,782 of wool, 76,034 of butter, and 632 bales of cotton. There were 1,144 horses, 2,278 milch cows, 3,495 other cattle, 8,320 sheep, and 9,893 swine. Capital, Lawrenceville.

VI. A S. E. County Of Georgia

A S. E. County Of Georgia, bounded 1ST. E. by Pendleton's river, S. by the Altamaha, and S. W. by the Little Ocmulgee, and intersected by the Oconee; area, 624 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 3,586, of whom 1,108 were colored. The surface is level and the soil sandy. The chief productions in 1870 were 70,405 bushels of Indian corn, 15,852 of oats, 11,437 of sweet potatoes, 21,353 lbs. of wool, 10,261 of butter, 391 bales of cotton, and 5,309 gallons of cane molasses. There were 589 horses, 3,339 milch cows, 9,222 other cattle, 9,853 sheep, and 9,246 swine. Capital, Mount Vernon.

III. A S. E. County Of Alabama

A S. E. County Of Alabama, bounded N. W. by the Alabama and Coosa rivers, and N. by the Tallapoosa; area, about 800 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 43,704, of whom 31,285 were colored. The surface is uneven and the soil generally fertile. Several railroads centre at Montgomery, and the Mobile and Girard crosses the S. E. corner. The chief productions in 1870 were 602,549 bushels of Indian corn, 25,648 of sweet potatoes, 25,517 bales of cotton, 3,735 lbs. of rice, and 1,599 gallons of cane molasses. There were 1,823 horses, 4,250 mules and asses, 3,027 milch cows, 5,569 other cattle, 980 sheep, and 13,909 swine; 2 flour mills, 4 saw mills, 2 founderies, and 2 railroad repair shops. Capital, Montgomery, which is also the capital of the state.

VIII. A N. Central County Of Mississippi

A N. Central County Of Mississippi, drained by Big Black river, formed since the census of 1870 from Carroll and Choctaw counties; area, about 525 sq. m. The surface is gently undulating, and the soil productive. It is traversed by the Mississippi Central railroad. Capital, Winona.

IX. An E. County Of Texas

An E. County Of Texas, drained by San Jacinto river and its tributaries; area, 852 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 6,483, of whom 3,351 were colored. It has a rolling surface, with an abundance of good timber, and the soil, with the exception of some sandy pine barrens, is fertile. The Houston and Great jSTorthern railroad passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 163,290 bushels of Indian corn, 41,945 of sweet potatoes, and 3,485 bales of cotton. There were 1,929 horses, 4,184 milch cows, 10,857 other cattle, 1,406 sheep, and 13,994 swine. Capital, Montgomery.

X. A W. County Of Arkansas

A W. County Of Arkansas, drained by Washita river and its branches; area, 1,050 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 2,984, of whom 120 were colored. The surface is mostly mountainous. The chief productions in 1870 were 3,072 bushels of wheat, 93,739 of Indian corn, 2,596 of oats, 273 bales of cotton, 3,044 lbs. of tobacco, 2,051 of wool, 19,252 of butter, 2,007 of honey, and 2,065 gallons of sorghum molasses. There were 570 horses, 945 milch cows, 1,756 other cattle, 1,318 sheep, and 5,762 swine. Capital, Mount Ida.

XI. A N. W. County Of Tennessee

A N. W. County Of Tennessee, bordering on Kentucky, and drained by Cumberland river and its branches; area, 500 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 24,747, of whom 11,670 were colored. The Louisville, Nashville, and Great Southern railroad traverses it. The chief productions in 1870 were 174,523 bushels of wheat, 810,194 of Indian corn, 62,378 of oats, 25,403 of Irish and 33,490 of sweet potatoes, 4,856,-378 lbs. of tobacco, 14,009 of wool, and 217,981 of butter. There were 3,023 horses, 2,569 mules and asses, 3,272 milch cows, 4,283 other cattle, 8,015 sheep, and 28,205 swine; 13 flour mills, 10 saw mills, 4 tanneries, 6 distilleries, and 1 woollen mill. Capital, Clarksville.

XII. A N. E. County Of Kentucky

A N. E. County Of Kentucky, area, 275 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 7,557, of whom 2,699 were colored. The surface is hilly and mountainous, and most of the soil fertile. The Mount Sterling division of the Louisville, Cincinnati, and Lexington railroad terminates at the county seat. The chief productions in 1870 were 31,-651 bushels of wheat, 16,259 of rye, 542,710 of Indian corn, 43,945 of oats, 16,285 of potatoes, 17,902 lbs. of wool, 87,244 of butter, and 2,087 tons of hay. There were 2,660 horses, 1,402 mules and asses, 1,977 milch cows, 8,606 other cattle, 5,215 sheep, and 12,641 swine. Capital, Mount Sterling.

XIII. A S. W. County Of Ohio

A S. W. County Of Ohio, drained by Miami river and its branches; area, 480 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 64,006. The surface is undulating, and the soil generally fertile. Trenton limestone is abundant. The Miami canal passes through it, and several railroads terminate at Dayton. The chief productions in 1870 were 824,003 bushels of wheat, 1,088,781 of Indian corn, 409,804 of oats, 83,002 of barley, 142,425 of potatoes, 45,197 of flax seed, 636,300 lbs. of flax, 3,963,183 of tobacco, 23,047 of wool, 650,826 of butter, and 19,301 tons of hay. There were 9,183 horses, 8,775 milch cows, 7,925 other cattle, 7,095 sheep, and 25,761 swine; 14manufactories of agricultural implements, 17 of brick, 34 of carriages and wagons, 2 of cotton goods, 2 of dressed flax, 14 of machinery, 8 of stone work, 7 of linseed oil, 13 of saddlery and harness, 4 of sash, doors, and blinds, 2 of woollen goods, 16 iron founderies, 13 tanneries, 8 distilleries, 11 breweries, 22 saw mills, 4 planing mills, and 25 flour mills. Capital, Dayton.

XIV. A W. County Of Indiana; Area

A W. County Of Indiana; Area, 504 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 23,765. The surface is level or undulating, and the soil is generally good. The Louisville, New Albany, and Chicago, and the Indianapolis, Bloomington, and Western railroads pass through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 706,172 bushels of wheat, 1,004,706 of Indian corn, 89,509 of oats, 69,409 of potatoes, 149,826 lbs. of wool, 391,403 of butter, and 18,104 tons of hay. There were 9,466 horses, 6,590 milch cows, 15,721 other cattle, 37,533 sheep, and 34,879 swine; 7 manufactories of furniture, 7 of brick, 10 of carriages, 6 of cooperage, 1 of iron castings, 2 of machinery, 7 of saddlery and harness, 4 of woollen goods, 1 pork-packing establishment, 23 saw mills, 1 planing mill, and 21 flour mills. Capital, Crawfordsville.

XV. A S. W. County Of Illinois

A S. W. County Of Illinois, area, 544 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 25,314. It has a diversified surface, partly covered with forests, and a rich soil. The Indianapolis and St. Louis and the Toledo, Wabash, and Western railroads pass through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 744,950 bushels of wheat, 1,527,898 of Indian corn, 668,424 of oats, 66,515 of potatoes, 54,608 lbs. of wool, 276,734 of butter, and 29,871 tons of hay. There were 12,447 horses, 6,400 milch cows, 7,510 other cattle, 12,881 sheep, and 34,773 swine; 7 manufactories of carriages, 1 of cars, 3 of cooperage, 5 of furniture, 1 of iron castings, 2 of machinery, 10 of saddlery and harness, 2 of woollen goods, 9 saw mills, 2 breweries, and 12 flour mills. Capital, Hillsborough.

XVI. A S. W. County Of Iowa

A S. W. County Of Iowa, drained by Nish-nabatona and West Nodaway rivers, tributaries of the Missouri; area, 432 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 5,934. The surface is undulating and the soil fertile. The Burlington and Missouri river railroad and its Red Oak branch pass through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 59,712 bushels of wheat, 323,168 of Indian corn, 37,393 of oats, 23,991 of potatoes, 18,492 lbs. of wool, 87,220 of butter, and 9,079 tons of hay. There were 1,461 horses, 1,256 milch cows, 2,475 other cattle, 4,503 sheep, and 10,-287 swine; 7 flour mills, and 3 lumber mills. Capital, Frankfort.

XVII. An E. County Of Missouri

An E. County Of Missouri, bounded S. by the Missouri river; area, 576 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 10,405, of whom 939 were colored. The surface is hilly in the region of the river, and in other parts undulating. Limestone, iron ore, and coal are found. The St. Louis, Kansas City, and Northern railroad passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 74,150 bushels of wheat, 543,112 of Indian corn, 297,035 of oats, 203,170 lbs. of tobacco, 38,083 of wool, 16,973 of butter, and 6,740 tons of hay. There were 3,375 horses, 2,943 milch cows, 5,214 other cattle, 10,350 sheep, and 14,041 swine. Capital, Danville.

XVIII. A S. E. County Of Kansas

A S. E. County Of Kansas, bordering on Indian territory, and intersected by Verdigris river; area, 624 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 7,564. It is traversed by the Leavenworth, Lawrence, and Galveston railroad. The surface consists of rolling prairies, and the soil is fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 12,665 bushels of Indian corn, 1,443 of potatoes, and 1,555 tons of hay. There were 1,629 horses, 1,595 milch cows, 4,090 other cattle, 674 sheep, 1,065 swine, and 9 saw mills. Capital, Independence.

Montgomery #1

Montgomery, a city of Montgomery co., Alabama, capital of the county and state, and the second city of the state in population and importance, situated on a high bluff on the left bank of the Alabama river, about 300 m. above Mobile, in lat. 32° 22' N. and Ion. 86° 23' W.; pop. in 1860, 8,843; in 1870, 10,588, of whom 5,183 were colored. The river is navigable to this point by steamers at all seasons, and four lines of railroad furnish means of communication with all sections of the state, viz.: the Mobile and Montgomery; Montgomery and Eufaula; South and North Alabama; and stern'of Alabama. The city is the point of supply and shipment of a large and fertile cotton region. Its trade in groceries is important, and its receipts of cotton are large. The entire trade amounts to nearly $10,000,000 a year. The chief manufacturing establishments are an iron foundery and a flouring mill. There are two national hanks, with a joint capital of £425,000, and three private banking houses. The state house, which occupies an elevated situation on Capitol hill, was erected in 1851 at a cost of $75,000, the original capi-tol having been destroyed by lire in 1849. The dome commands a fine view of the city and adjacent country.

Among other public buildings are the court house, a fine city hall containing a market and rooms for the fire department, and the theatre. The city is lighted with gas. and supplied with water by artesian wells and water works (from the river) of sufficient capacity to keep in reservoir three months supply for 25,000 people. The public schools are attended by about 300 white and 500 colored children, and there are several private schools, with a large attendance. Three daily newspapers (issuing also weekly editions) and a weekly agricultural journal are published. There are If churches, viz.: 4 Baptist (2 colored), 1 Episcopal, 1 Jewish, 5 Methodist (2 colored and 1 Northern), 1 Presbyterian, lrotestant Methodist, and 1 Roman Catho- Montgomery was laid out in 1817, and the seat of government, was removed to it from Tuscaloosa in 1847. It was the seat of the confederate government from Feb. 4, 1861, to the following May, when it was removed to Richmond. The city was evacuated by the confederates April 11, 1865, after burning 80,-000 bales of cotton, and on the following day it was occupied by the federal forces under Gen. Wilson, when the arsenal, railroad depots, and foundery were destroyed.

State Capitol, Montgomery.

State Capitol, Montgomery.