Muntjac (cervicitis, De Blainv., or stylocerus, H. Smith), the name of several small East Indian deer, which seem to make the transition from the typical cervidoe to the musk deer. The horns are small, with only one anterior snag, elevated on pedicels supported by longitudinal ridges on the face; there are large canines in the upper jaw, and large and deep suborbital pits; there are no metatarsal glands nor tufts; the hoofs are triangular, partly united in front by a web, and the false hoofs small and transverse; the hair is thin, shining, and generally unspotted, and the tail is tufted; the form is light and elegant. The few species inhabit the forests and jungles of elevated regions in India and its archipelago, where they are hunted for their excellent venison. The common muntjac or kijang (C. vaginalis, Gray) is dark reddish brown, with the lower parts lighter, and a narrow white streak on the front edge of the thigh; it is about 21/6. ft. high at the shoulders; in the living animal there are two folds of skin along the sides of the ridges which support the horns, uniting below like a V, but drying after death in three ribbed lines, which suggested to Pennant the name of rib-faced deer.

The principal horns are 4 or 5 in. long, at first straight, but curving inward and backward at the top, the anterior antler being about 1½ in.; the pedicels upon which they rest are 3 in. high, covered with skin and hair, so that when the antlers are shed they appear to have straight horns. The food consists chiefly of a kind of sugar cane, and malvaceous and succulent plants. Its speed and agility are great, the flight being generally in a circle; when brought to bay, it is capable of inflicting severe wounds upon the dogs with its canines; it is sometimes taken in snares, and falls a frequent victim to beasts of prey. It is found in Sumatra and Java. The Nepaul muntjac (C. moschatus, De Blainv.) is bright reddish yellow, the thigh streaked and under the tail white, and the chin and throat whitish. The Chinese muntjac (G. Reevesii, Gray) is grayish brown, with the hair short, with paler rings; it has a larger head and tail than the common species, with less red and more bluish tinge, and no white over the hoofs.

According to Gray, the earl of Derby had these three species at the Knowsley menagerie; but they so bred together that it became "impossible to discrimi-nate.the mules from the original species".

Muntjac (Cervulus vaginalis).

Muntjac (Cervulus vaginalis).