Nazareth (now En-Nazireh), a town of Palestine, 20 m. S. E. of Acre, and 65 m. N. of Jerusalem; pop. about 4,000, about one fourth of whom are of the Greek church, the rest being Moslems, Greek Catholics, Latins, and Maronites. It is beautifully situated in a valley surrounded on all sides by hills. The houses are mostly of stone, well built, and flat-roofed. The population has a more prosperous appearance than in any other part of the country, and the women of Nazareth are famous for their beauty. At the periodical feasts there is an immense influx of pilgrims. The principal edifices are the Latin convent, the finest in Palestine, the Latin church of the Annunciation, the Casa Nuova, or Christian caravansary, a Mohammedan mosque, and a khan. It is celebrated as the residence of Christ during the first 30 years of his life.

Nazareth.

Nazareth.

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Nazareth, a village of Northampton co., Pa., 60 m. N. by W. of Philadelphia and 9 m. N. W. of Easton; pop. in 1870, 949. It was founded by George Whitefield in 1740, who, before completing an edifice in course of erection intended as a school for the instruction of African children, sold it to Count Zinzendorf, who finished it for the use of the Moravians. The village contains two large churches and a Moravian academy for boys.