Peterwardein (Hung. Petervdrad), a fortress of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy, called " the Hungarian Gibraltar," in the Slavonian portion of the former Military Frontier, on the right bank of the Danube, 170 m. S. S. E. of Pesth, and 42 m. N. W. of Belgrade; pop. in 1870, 4,022, exclusive of the garrison. The upper fortress is on a lofty escarped rock overhanging a sharp promontory formed by a bend of the river, opposite the town and steamboat station of Neusatz in the Hungarian county of Bacs, contains extensive barracks and arsenals for a large force, and presents to the water and land sides a formidable face of walls, port holes, and bastions.

Fortress of Peterwardcin.

Fortress of Peterwardcin.

At the foot of the rock is the lower fortress, which contains the town proper. The two fortresses hold 10,000 soldiers. Under the Romans it was known as Acumincum. The present name is derived from Peter the Hermit, who is said to have marshalled here his followers in the first crusade. Prince Eugene achieved at Peterwardein a decisive victory over the Turks, Aug. 5, 1716. The Hungarians held out bravely here in 1848-'9 until after the surrender of Gorgey and of Arad.