Cane marl..........   16 parts

Ball clay............   12 parts

Feldspar........:. . .     8 parts

China clay..........     6 parts

Flint...............     4 parts

Cream

Ball clay...........   22 parts

China clay.........     5.5 parts

Flint..............     5 parts

Feldspar...........     3.5 parts

Cane marl.........   12 parts

Black

Ball clay...........   120 parts

Ground ocher......   120 parts

Ground manganese.     35 parts

Buff

Ball clay............   12 parts

China clay..........   10 parts

Feldspar............     8 parts

Bull fire clay........   16 parts

Yellow ocher........     3 parts

Drab

Cane marl..........   30 parts

Ball clay............   10 parts

Stone..............     7 parts

Feldspar............     4 parts

Brown

Red marl...........   50 parts

China clay..........     7 parts

Ground manganese ..     6 parts

Feldspar............     3 parts

In making mazarine blue glazed bricks use the white body and stain the glaze only.

Mazarine blue....... 1 part

Glaze.............. 7 parts

For royal blue use 1 part stain to 6 parts white body, and glaze unstained.

Blood-Red Stain

Numerous brick manufacturers possess beds of clay from which good and sound bricks or tiles can be made, the only drawback being that the clay does not burn a good color. In many cases this arises from the fact that the clay contains more or less sulphur or other impurity, which spoils the external appearance of the finished article. The following stain will convert clay of any color into a rich, deep red, mixed in proportions of stain, 1 part, to clay, 60 parts.

Stain

Crocus martis....... 20 parts

Yellow ocher........ 4 parts

Sulphate of iron...... 10 parts

Red oxide of iron..... 2 parts

A still cheaper method is to put a slip or external coating upon the goods. The slip being quite opaque, effectively hides the natural color of the brick or tile upon which it may be used. The process is to mix:

Blood-red stain...... 1 part

Good red clay....... 6 parts

Add water until the mixture becomes about the consistency of cream, then with a sponge force the liquid two or three times through a very fine brass wire lawn, No. 80, and dip the goods in the liquid as soon as they are pressed or molded.