[Ft.] The clove tree is of the Myrtle order, and is a native of the Spice Islands, but is now cultivated in Zanzibar and the West Indies and other tropical countries. It resembles the laurel, and grows to a height of from 15 to 40 feet. Its leaves are large and oblong, its flowers small and dark red, and its fruit is like an olive in shape, but red like the flowers. The fruit, when dried, is known as "mother of cloves."

CLOVES

CLOVES

The cloves used for flavoring are the unopened flower-buds. These buds become dark-brown, and look like nails ; and so they take their name from clou, the French word for nail. The little ball which seems to form the head of the nail is really composed of the petals of the flower, and will unroll if soaked in water. Cloves are used for their strong aromatic taste in flavoring food such as puddings, cakes, and preserves. Oil of cloves is useful in medicine, and to scent toilet soap. coach. [Fr., from Gk. conche, a shell.] A frame-' work with cover and seats, set on wheels, for carrying people, having doors in the sides and an elevated seat for the driver. Mail coaches and tally-ho coaches often have four seats inside and seats for twelve outside.