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The Game Of Golf | by William Park, Jun.



Although professional golfers have always been teachers of the game, their instruction has been imparted more by example than by precept. Such a method was and is undoubtedly the best, but it is not available to the same extent at the present day as it was, say, fifty or even twenty years ago, and hence a demand has sprung up for books of instruction. Amateur golfers have hitherto been the sole contributors to the literature of the game, but the belief has frequently been expressed to me that a volume coining from a professional would be read with interest, and it has also been suggested that I should undertake to write one...

TitleThe Game Of Golf
AuthorWilliam Park, Jun.
PublisherLongmans, Green, And Co.
Year
CopyrightLongmans, Green, And Co.
AmazonThe Game of Golf

By William Park, Jun. Champion Golfer, 1887-89

The Game Of GolfThe Game Of Golf 2

With Numerous Illustrations Third Edition

-Preface
Although professional golfers have always been teachers of the game, their instruction has been imparted more by example than by precept. Such a method was and is undoubtedly the best, but it is not a...
-Chapter I. The Game Of Golf
Although golf has become a universal pastime only within the last few years, it is a game of considerable antiquity, and has been played in Scotland from time out of mind. Who invented golf, if indeed...
-The Game Of Golf. Part 2
It is a curious fact that there are no written laws of golf regarding the implements - either clubs or balls - to be used in playing the game; but it is sate to assume that only golf-clubs and golf-ba...
-The Game Of Golf. Part 3
A golf-match is sometimes played by a 'foursome' and, as the term implies, four persons engage in it, two playing against the other two. The play is in no particular different from that in a single ab...
-Golf Clubs
The first difficulty that presents itself to any one who desires to learn to play the game of golf is the choice of clubs and balls. In the older days this was a much simpler matter than it is now: th...
-Golf Clubs. Part 2
Fig.3 Morden Golf Clubs. Patent golf-clubs have been mentioned, and it is proposed to refer to such of them as may be considered necessary or desirable as occasion requires. To give a complete list...
-Golf Clubs. Part 3
Of the Driving-cleek there are many forms. The plain driving-cleek is just an ordinary clock, with less loft than usual on the face and a longer shaft, the spring of it being suited to the weight of t...
-Golf Clubs. Part 4
Many players like their clubs to have leather faces, and I am rather in favour of this. Leather faces were originally devised for repairing clubs that had become damaged by tear and wear, but they arc...
-Golf Clubs. Part 5
The would-be golfer having an eye to the fitness of things will probably begin by selecting a driver - the club with which he takes the first stroke at the tee. Having the maker's stock before him, so...
-Golf Clubs. Part 6
The above remarks apply also to selecting an iron or a mashie. In playing with an iron it is usual, for the reason explained in Chapter v (Approaching)., to take away a little turf with the stroke, an...
-Golf Clubs. Part 7
While a good game can be played with comparatively few clubs, the addition of two or three more to a set will frequently obviate the necessity of having to play difficult strokes. So long as a full st...
-Golf Balls, etc
Without going into history, it may briefly be stated that in the early part of the century the only golf-ball in use was the old feather ball, which was made by forcing feathers into a spherical leath...
-Chapter III. Style Of Play
It is of the first importance that a golfer should have a good style of play, these words being here used as including grip of club, stance, and swing. One frequently hears it said, 'What does my styl...
-Style Of Play. Part 2
Fig. 10. - The Grip - Position Of Hands At Top Of Swing (Back View). Fig. 11. - The Grip - A Bad Position Of Hands At Top Of Swing. It must not be supposed that when once the club is grasped the h...
-Style Of Play. Part 3
Fig 15. The. Drive. - Mr. Laidlay Addressing The Ball.. Fig. 10. - The Drive - Diagram Of Mr. Laidlay's Position. I have not yet referred to the position of the legs. Fig. 12 will show that I st...
-Style Of Play. Part 4
This is the upward part of the swing. In making it the body should not be inclined to the right side; the backbone should be kept steady, and should form, as it were, a pivot round which the shoulders...
-Style Of Play. Part 5
Fig. 20 -The Proper Kind Of Swing, Viz. One That Will Sweep The Ball Away (The Line Represents The Curve Described By The Club-Head). It is not possible for me to catalogue the various bad habits i...
-Style Of Play. Part 6
The ball should be hit with the centre of the face of the club. The maker's name is a good guide for the point of impact. If hit near the heel of the club the ball will go straight a certain distance,...
-Chapter IV. The Long Game
The expression 'the long game' is applied to driving, or strokes off the tec, and to play through the green, or the intermediate strokes between the drive and the approach to the hole, with the except...
-The Long Game. Part 2
Fig 24 - A Good Tee. F1G. 25. - A BAD TEE If, in the course of the preliminary waggle, or in drawing back the club in the act of swinging, it happens to touch the ground behind the ball, it will...
-The Long Game. Part 3
Fig. 20. - A Cupp'Ed Ball. A heavy-lying ball is frequently got on inland courses - that is, a ball lying more or less imbedded in grass or rushes. For such a lie a brassy or a cleek should be used...
-Chapter V. Approaching
The term approach, in its strictest sense, is applied to any stroke which is intended to lay the ball on the putting-green. It is not, however, applied to a teed shot which reaches the green at a shor...
-Approaching. Part 2
Fig. 29. - The Approach - Addressing The Ball,. Fig. 31. - A Half Shot - The Top Of The Swing. Fig. 80. - The Approach - Diagram Of Posltion. Some golfers can drive a very long ball with a ha...
-Approaching. Part 3
The alternative mode of playing approaches is 'off' the left leg.' The best exponent of this style is Mr. Laidlay, and the illustration (Fig. 35) and diagram (Fig. 36) represent that gentleman's posit...
-Chapter VI. Putting
Reference to the rules of the game will show that the putting-green is defined as the ground within twenty yards of the hole, excepting hazards. Putting applies strictly to play upon the putting-green...
-Putting. Part 2
Fig. 38. Putting - Addressing The Ball. The stance differs slightly from that for either driving or approaching. It is shown by the illustration, Fig. 38, and the diagram, Fig. 39. Here, as in the ...
-Putting. Part 3
Golfers who desire to play the short game steadily and accurately will never regret taking plenty of time to their putts. It is a grand mistake to play hurriedly. At the same time I do not counsel an ...
-Chapter VII. Play Out Of Hazards
A golf-links entirely devoid of hazards would be a very poor place indeed. Notwithstanding the amount of abuse lavished upon all hazards in general, it is to their presence that the game owes much of ...
-Play Out Of Hazards. Continued
I have already pointed out that a ball in a bunker may sometimes bo found teed; such a ball is not to be lightly regarded. The safest course is generally to play it in the same way as any other bunker...
-Chapter VIII. General Remarks On The Game
To write a chapter of general remarks on the game might become a very serious undertaking were no limit placed upon the nature of the subject. This book is intended as a guide to golfers in playing, a...
-General Remarks On The Game. Part 2
One sometimes hears it said of a successful golfer that he 'plays with his head as well as his hands,' and the meaning of this remark is too obvious to require explanation. There are many little arts ...
-General Remarks On The Game. Part 3
To play golf one must know the rules of golf thoroughly, and conform thereto in every respect. There is only one game of golf, and that must be played according to the strict letter of the law, or els...
-General Remarks On The Game. Part 4
I have frequently heard comments made upon the scores taken in playing matches; but, in the general case, such comments are manifestly unjust, to the players. If the scores are low, the play must have...
-General Remarks On The Game. Part 5
The amount of practice requisite will vary with different players. Some men can play for a long time and get steadier and better as the days go on. Others will come to their top game more quickly, and...
-General Remarks On The Game. Part 6
Fore-caddies are not, on most greens, usually employed save in important matches. In the rules of golf there are a few paragraphs devoted to what is called the 'etiquette of golf.' These have for the...
-Chapter IX. Competitions And Handicapping
It is usual for golf clubs to hold three or four prize meetings or competitions in the course of each year. These are frequently named after the seasons in which they take place - as the spring, summe...
-Competitions And Handicapping. Part 2
Name of Player. Actual Score. Handicap. Net Result. A ... 90 - 8 = 82 First prize. B ... 83 - 0 = ...
-Competitions And Handicapping. Part 3
What has been written deals with medal play, or play for score; but club members require to be handicapped for tournament or hole play as well. The old practice was simple, viz. to give every player h...
-Chapter X. Laying Out And Keeping Golf-Links
Until a few years ago a golf-links at a distance from the seashore was a thing seldom seen. True it is that there were one or two inland courses on which the game has been played for centuries, such a...
-Laying Out And Keeping Golf-Links. Part 2
In regard to the shape of a links, 1 personally think those on which the holes go straight out to the ninth and return in the opposite direction are preferable; but this must be decided by the nature ...
-Laying Out And Keeping Golf-Links. Part 3
The selection of putting-greens is a much more difficult matter. The variety of places on which they can bo formed is infinite. They may be on the level course, or in a natural hollow or basin, provid...
-Laying Out And Keeping Golf-Links. Part 4
When the ground has to bo cleared of whins, etc., they should be rooted up and not merely cut over. Whins are, I may mention, delicate of growth, and walking over soon kills them out. When a new gree...
-Laying Out And Keeping Golf-Links. Part 5
On eightecn-hole courses it is usual to have the flags of different colours for the outgoing and the incoming nine holes, Red going out and white coming in. or rice versa., these colours showing up be...
-Chapter XI. The Laws Of Golf
The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews are generally recognised to be the lawgivers of the game, and the St. Andrews Rules arc invariably adopted by other clubs. It is somewhat unfortunate, ho...
-Rules For The Game Of Golf
Adopted by the: Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews on 29th September 1891, as amended on 1st May 1895. 1. The game of golf is played by two or more sides, each playing its own ball. A side ma...
-Rules For The Game Of Golf. Part 2
See Rules 13, 17, 20, 21, 22, 32, 36, 38; Special Rules for Medal Play, 8 and 'J. 11. In playing through the green, all loose impediments, within a club-length of a ball which is not lying in or touc...
-Rules For The Game Of Golf. Part 3
Observe the latter part of the rule. The player is not entitled to improve his position. He is only entitled to see where his ball lies before striking at it. 19. When a ball is to be dropped, the pl...
-Rules For The Game Of Golf. Part 4
28. If a ball be lost, the player's side loses the hole. A ball shall be held as lost if it be not found within live minutes after the search is begun. I apprehend that for the purposes of this rule ...
-Special Rules For Medal Play
(1.) In club competitions, the competitor doing the stipulated course in fewest strokes shall be the winner. ('2.) If the lowest score be made by two or more competitors, the tics shall be decided by...
-Etiquette Of Golf
It is doubtful how far the following injunctions are obligatory as laws of the game, except by courtesy, but there is no doubt that they ought to be observed, and there is also no doubt that custom au...
-Local Rules For St. Andrews Links
1. When the Green Committee consider it necessary, a telegraph board shall be used to give the numbers for starting. 2. If the ball lie in any position in the Swilcan Burn, whether in water or not, t...
-Index To Rules
Note. - This Index does not embrace the Etiquette of Golf, nor the Local Rules for St. Andrews Links (the italics REFER to hulks for mEdaL play) Rule Advice. ..... 37 ...
-Rules Mode And Order Of Playing The Game
1. The game of golf is played by two persons, or by four (two of a side playing alternately). It may also be played by three or more persons, each playing his own ball. The game commences by each sid...
-Rules Mode And Order Of Playing The Game. Continued
Impediments Not Liftable 14. Nothing fixed or growing may be removed. A ball being in a hazard, nothing may be lifted. 'Rub Of The Green,' Etc. 15. Whatever happens by accident to a ball in motion,...
-Ball On Putting-Greens
Except on medal days, a ball driven on to a putting-green (other than the one being played to) must be lifted and dropped off the green, but not nearer the hole, without penalty. Note. - Members are ...
-Match Play Odds
In singles, three-fourths of difference between handicap allowances. In foursomes, three-eighths of difference between the aggregate handicap allowances on either side. A half stroke, or over, shall...
-Points Of Difference Between The Rules Of The Royal Wimbledon And Royal And Ancient Golf Clubs
Royal Wimbledon Golf Club Rule 7. - Ball in Water. If the ball lie in casual water on the course it may be teal behind the hazard, losing one stroke. If the ball be in water in a hazard, or the wat...
-Chapter XII. Glossary Of Technical Terms Frequently Used In Connection With The Game Of Golf
Addressing the ball The act of the player placing himself in position to strike the ball. Approach The stroke by which a player endeavours to play his ball on to the putting-green. See also page 10...
-Glossary Of Technical Terms Frequently Used In Connection With The Game Of Golf. Continued
When a player gives his opponent 'half-one,' he gives him a handicap of a stroke at every second hole - that is to say, he must, to halve these holes, do each of them in one stroke less than his oppon...







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previous page: How To Play Golf | by Harry Vardon
  
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