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Golf at Gleneagles | by R. J. Maclennan



And when ten thousand people who hare played the game at Gleneagles agree with the professional champions that the Courses can be described as the rare, the charming beyond imagination, the claim that they are unsurpassed in the World of Golf cannot be lightly dismissed."

TitleGolf at Gleneagles
AuthorR. J. Maclennan
PublisherMccorqudale & Co. Limited
Year1919
Copyright1919, Mccorqudale & Co. Limited
AmazonGolf at Gleneagles
The Plack 11
-Preface
And when ten thousand people who hare played the game at Gleneagles agree with the professional champions that the Courses can be described as the rare, the charming beyond imagination, the claim...
-The Prelude
WHEN Sir Walter Scott, opening for us the faery casements of romance, illumined in the storied page the glory of Scotland and the mystic glamour of its green forests, its heather hills and lon...
-The Plack
THOSE curious regarding place names may he interested in the origin of Gleneagles. It naturally suggests the eagle: local folk, however, say that it is an adaptation of Glen de l'eglise. In ol...
-The Precedent
THE glories of Gleneagles are not new-born. The Golf Course is admittedly modern, having been opened so recently as Midsummer, 1919. Its birthday is recorded by the Cairn on the ridge adjoining ...
-The Problem
IT is one thing to choose the site of a golf course and another thing to make the golf course. The magnificence of the site set the problem, and it was fully realised that the solution had to be...
-The Paean
IN Gleneagles the call of the game is ever insistent, but while yon may go there with no purpose beyond golf, yet in the pageantry of the passing seasons the landscape far and near will hold you enthr...
-The Plan
WHILE it is true that to all good golfers the play's the thing rather than the plan, it is believed that a plan of the Gleneagles Golf Course may prove to he of interest. A plan is therefore appende...
-The Play
IN golfing at Gleneagles you will enjoy that tingling glow of delight that invariably animates the keen sportsman when he finds perfect conditions for play. You are at once impressed by the remarkable...
-The King's Course
Your first impressions of the King's Course will hearten you for your game. Its length is about 6,125 yards. You may have heard that it is a wonderful course, but one does not always believe all one h...
-The First Hole. Dun Whinny
Dun Whinny has all the essentials of a tine first hole, and is exceptionally attractive. The breadth of the fairway inspires a confident swing even in the beginner, but the great point is that playe...
-The Second Hole - The East Neuk
The East Neuk is to many players a favourite of the course. It has been spoken of as having the qualities that attach to the best holes on the leading seaside courses with the added att...
-The Third Hole - The Silver Tassie
Having now got into your stride - let us hope - you will find that the Silver Tassie calls for fresh artistry. It is a blind hole both for drive and approach, the only one of the kind on the course. T...
-The Fourth Hole - The Broomy Law
Examination of the plan of the Broomy Law will immediately suggest a hole that is full of wonderful interest and beauty, and the playing of it will happily enhance that impression. The fairway is a de...
-The Fifth Hole The Het Girdle
The Het Girdle is one of the wee ones and one of the kittle ones. The tee with its triple projections in echelon form has behind it the White Water, a little loch with reeds swaying in the wind an...
-The Sixth Hole - Blink Bonnie
From a short hole you go to the longest Blink Bonnie 'I he distance man whose best friends are his wooden clubs gets his chance here, for the length is 455 yards. It is a splendid test tor really long...
-The Seventh Hole - The Kittle Kink
The Kittle Kink is a real left hand dog-leg hole - the most decided of its kind at Gleneagles. It is 420 yards in length and there is a rise in level of 6 feet from tee to green. You drive from high g...
-The Eighth Hole - The Whaup's Nest
Another short hole now adds its fascination to the round, and it is well named the Whaup's Nest. The tee stands high above a little loch - or lochan as it is called in Scotland - known as the Black ...
-The Ninth Hole - The Heich O' Fash
The surroundings of the Heich o' Fash are typical of the Highlands. They are such as any artist of keen perception might choose for an ideal impression of Highland scenery. The green stands on a plate...
-The Tenth Hole - The Westlin Wyne
By way of proving that the ingenuity of man can keep your interest in the course fresh from the first tee to the last green, the Westlin' Wyne has been so planned, on the basis of Nature's original de...
-The Eleventh Hole - The Deil's Creel
Once again a short hole - the Deil's Creel - ensconced in heather where grouse are wont to gather and where the golfer may feel like grasping the gun rather than the golf club when he raises a covey a...
-The Twelth Hole - The Tappit Hen
With the Lanely Dell on the left and the fine prospect in front the Ochil Hills and Craig Rossie prominent in the picture- you are once again impressed by the beauty of the landscape. The view from th...
-The Thirteenth Hole - Braid's Brawest
Named after our imperturbable adviser - a happy compliment to the great golfer to whose experience as a player and to whose knowledge as a designer the Gleneagles Course owes so much - Braid's Brawest...
-The Fourteenth Hole - The Denty Den
To the left of the tee to the Denty Den we have the Hielan' Line, the prominent height of which is Drumsichty, another coign of vantage in the landscape view, 611 feet above the level of the sea. We d...
-The Fifteenth Hole - The Howe O' Hope
Finer encouragement than is given to players at the Howe o' Hope could not be imagined, and at no stage of the game is it likely to be more welcome. Playing from an elevated tee your first impression ...
-The Sixteenth Hole - The Wee Bogle
The Wee Bogle is the shortest hole on the course. It would he a terrible mistake to think it the easiest. It is a truly sporting shot from the tee. There are bunkers to right, bunkers to left, and bun...
-The Seventeenth Hole - The Warslin Lea
In all the keenest games the hole before the last is perhaps the real test of accurate and well matched golf. It is frequently on the seventeenth that the game is lost and won. And it is a no less int...
-The Eighteenth Hole - The King's Hame
And now for the last hole! the King's Hame. Here Nature has planned a surprise tor you by adding with generous hand some of the breadth taken from the Warslin' Lea. and also imparting a pleasing desce...
-The Queen's Course
In the appreciation of Glencagles by golfers of standing there is singular unanimity in the opinion that excellent as the King's Course is the Queen's Course is in no way interior. The only variation ...
-Score Card Queen's Course
prayer OUT and IN Strokes Holes No. NAME Length in yards BOGEY self ...
-The First Hole - The Trystin' Tree
The Trystin' Tree is as pleasing a green as its name implies, and recalls nearly as many happy memories. Braid will tell you that it is the pick of the nine, and there are many golfers who say the sam...
-The Second Hole - The Needle E'e
To test your short game the Needle E'e affords all that is necessary. It is a plateau preen 140 yards distant from the tee and about 6 feet above it. There are three hunkers on the face of the plateau...
-The Third Hole - The Heather Bell
The Heather Bell, with its plateau green on the horizon approached by the long and wide fairway, running through heath and heather on a uniformly ascending gradient, is very attractive as viewed from ...
-The Fourth Hole - The Warlock Knowe
The Warlock Knowe is the furthest out hole on the Queen's Course. Starting from the tee you still find heathery muirland to the right, an attractive broomy rig to the left and, 340 yards ahead, the in...
-The Fifth Hole - The Witches' Bowster
The Witches' Bowster is the turning point of the golfer's career on the Queen's Course. Hitherto the play has been westward, now it is eastward and the homeward journey commences. Throughout the entir...
-The Sixth Hole - The Leddy's Ain
At the Leddy's Ain you realise - perhaps for the first time - the value of the valley that separates the King's Course from the Queen's Course the Heuch o' Dule. The Heuch is situated to the righ...
-The Seventh Hole - The Lovers' Gait
Laid in a north-easterly direction and running between two natural rigs, the fairway of the Lovers' Gait in its general configuration and pleasing undulation of surface, its natural hazards and excell...
-The Eighth Hole - The Hinny Mune
At first sight the Hinny Mune seems somewhat of an enigma, and closer inspection confirms the impression of mystery. Obviously unique it inspires a sense of awe. but it is full of interest and particu...
-The Ninth Hole - The Queen's Hame
Leaving the Hinny Mune and walking to the Queen's Hame you meander through a young plantation where twines the path, and reach the eminence overlooking the waters of the Deuk Dubs and the rippling c...
-The Poesy
GOLFERS, the world over, will readily admit that the significance of mere numbers as the accepted designation of the varied expanses tor play on many golf courses is at the best weak and colourl...
-The Poesy. Continued
Auld Scotia's sangs ! Auld Scotia's sangs ! - the strains o' youth and yore ! - O lilt to me, and I will list - will list them o'er and o'er; Though mak' me wae, or mak' me wud, or changefu' as a chil...
-Dux Whinny
Dun in Scots is derived from the Celtic term for a hill. We find it linked in such place names as Dunblane, Dunkeld and Dundee. And in the vicinity of Gleneagles, as everybody knows, there is Dunsina...
-The East Neuk
The blast Neuk, as the second hole is called, is simply the east corner. We of the North speak of neuk as a corner - the cosy corner by the tire is the ingle neuk The fairest neuk in a' the la...
-The Silver Tassie
France has supplied Scotland with many expressive derivatives, and in Silver Tassie we have an adaptation of the Ercnch la tasse - the cup. The young silver birch trees grouped at this point, fringi...
-The Broomy Law
At the Broomy Law law signifies little hill, as in Berwick Law, Greenlaw, and other Scottish place names we have the broom flowering in springtime in a blaze of yellow, as, we are told, it flowere...
-The Het Girdle
The Het Girdle fits in admirably as a description of the fifth hole. Sir Walter Scott in the Black Dwarf makes Elliot say of the apparition She hirples like a hen on a het girdle. But what, you en...
-Blink Bonnie
Blink Bonnie is the alliterative term for a glimpse of beauty. To the Scot it has a deeper meaning, a meaniny so haunting and yet so elusive that nothing else but Blink Bonnie can give it form. It ...
-Blink Bonnie Fairway
At Kirk or at Market, whene'er ye meet me, Gang by me as tho' that ye cared nae a flee; But steal me a blink o' your bonnie black e'e, Yet look as ye werena lookin' at me. And admirers of Hogg's M...
-The Kittle Kine
In the Kittle Kink we have fine combination of dialect terms. Kittle stands for ticklish, in the sense of any difficulty that is tricky rather than formidable, while kink is an awkward corner, ben...
-The Beeches A Bring Oon Te Kittle Kink
Syne you must cross the blasted heath Where fairies oft are seen, A vile uncanny kittle gait To nam; on Hallowe'en. So wrote Train in his Mountain .Muse. Rut possibly the most appropriate r...
-The Whaup's Nest
The curlew in Scotland is known as the whaup, and where the whaups gather we naturally find a Whaup's Nest, a charming designation for this the eighth hole. The situation of the green on a gently ri...
-The Heich O' Fash
The course now leads to the Heich o' Eash the heich, height or hill of trouble. What the Englishman calls hill and dale the Scot speaks of as heich an' howe. So in heich we have a little hill...
-The Westlin' Wyne
A westward (westlin') direction is now followed, for at the Westlin' Wyne we are at the turn or wyne. When a Scots ploughman, having finished one furrow, starts another, he makes his horses wyne (p...
-The Deil's Creel
Helping you to an understanding of the Deil's Creel you have more verses by Burns if you care to turn to them: - The Deil cam' fiddlin' through the town And danced awa' wi' the Exciseman, And il...
-The Tappit Hen
Behind the green known as the Tappit Hen stands a clump of young trees, forming, in a manner of speaking, a crest on the crown of a little hill. The circumstance led to the choice of the name. A tapp...
-Braid's Brawest
Braid's Brawest is the braid Scots tor Braid's Best, brawest being the superlative of braw which means handsome, or beautiful or very good; surpassing in every respect. A well-known Scottish song ...
-The Denty Den
The Denty Den is simply the Dainty Dell. The Scottish denty is even more comprehensively expressive than its English equivalent and is used with a far greater freedom, as for example in the old nu...
-The Howe O' Hope
'The Howe o' Hope, or if you will the valley of good cheer howe meaning a little valley or sma' glen is a hole marked by fresh uplifting influences. Hope! of all the ills that men endure. The o...
-The Wee Bogle
Bogle stands for ghost or goblin or demon. It is even applied to a scarecrow as in tattie bogle, the ragged dummy - bogie man - placed with arms extended in potato fields to frighten away the raidin...
-The Warslin Lea
The Warslin' Lea is the expanse on which well-matched opponents wrestle to obtain victory. To struggle with difficulties is to warsel: it is sometimes warsell or warstle. The wail's wra...
-The King's Hame
The King's Hame hardly calls for interpretation. It is the home green on this, the King's Course. East, west, hame's best, and the tradition we all treasure, if we have been born under a lucky star ...
-The Trystin Tree
Trees lend their grace to the tee and to the further borders of the green at the first hole, and so we have the Trystin' Tree, the term ' tryst meaning. at one and the same time, a rendezvous, an eng...
-The Needle E'e
At the Needle E'e, or, to be more explicit, the Needle Eye, you are called to play through a natural hazard consisting of a gap in a belt of trees, and you repeat the process when you come to threat! ...
-The Heather Bell
Here you arc in no doubt regarding the claims of den-eagles to supply the right sort of Heather mixture. Bell heather, pink and purple, lines the fairway, fringes the bunkers, and in a crescent of r...
-The Warlock Knowe
Warlocks, witches and wizards, in olden times, were believed to be evil spirits in the guise of human beings, and were very much feared. A knowe, pronounced now, is a well-defined hillock or knoll, ...
-The Witches' Bowster
The Witches' Bowster - the pillow or bolster of the witches - is the chosen designation for the fifth hole. It is situated alongside Loch-an-Eerie, and suggests a resting place such as might be chosen...
-The Leddy's Ain
The Leddy's Ain presents little difficulty to the understanding even of the uninitiated. It is the Lady's Own, a compliment, or a toast, it you will, to The Ladies. The approach to the green is spe...
-The Lovers' Gait
The Lovers' Gait is the lovers' way, and the name has been adopted because at this point we are on what was known as the Lovers' Walk long before Gleneagles was a golf course. Here the youthful coup...
-The Hinny Mune
As a happy sequence to the Lovers' Gait there follows the Hinny Mime hinny in raidScots stands tor both honey and sweetness, while mune pronounced nun is obviously the moon, so we have the hon...
-The Queen's Hame
The title the Queen's Hame given to this hole is the last word in titles, so to speak. It is the home or hame hole of the Queen's Course. O the Queen's Hame is bonnie, An' the Queen's Hame is b...
-The Deuk Dubs On The Queen's Hame
The Queen's Hame suggests Royal progress and the environment heightens that impression. There is a queenly grace in the immediate landscape, and it may he that looking across the Deuk Dubs - the pictu...
-The Pilgrimage
ALL railways and all roads lead to Gleneagles. The Caledonian Railway and the Great North Road each connecting London with Perth and the far North, pass within half-a-mile of the Golf Course. Bo...
-The Professional
THE importance of having a golfer of proved ability permanently engaged at Gleneagles to supervise important matters directly related to the play, and to act, when desired, as instructor, was a ...
-A Gleneagles Boy Caddie
To his professional work he brings all the best qualities of the sporting amateur and an appreciation of the amateur's difficulties. His style answers to all that is best in attractive play, and is de...
-The Postscript
THE value of a postscript lies in the opportunity a writer is given to conclude any written statement with a reference to some point supreme significance; not an afterthought, nor a side-issue, ...
-The Postscript. Continued
As well as a miniature golf course for practice in pitching and putting in the precincts of the hotel, it is intended that there should also be first-class tennis courts and croquet lawns in the immed...







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previous page: Intimate Golf Talks | by John Duncan Dunn
  
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next page: The Art Of Golf | by Bart W. G. Simpson