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Hints To Golfers | by O. K. Niblick



Golf is probably the most scientific of all out-door games, requiring as much accuracy of stroke as tennis and far more judgment than cricket or base-ball...

TitleHints To Golfers
AuthorO. K. Niblick
PublisherO. K. Niblick
Year1902
Copyright1902, The Salem Press Company
AmazonHints To Golfers

Dedicated to Tom Morris and Andrew Kirkaldy of St. Andrews, to Willie Fernie of Leeds, and to Joseph Lloyd, and those other professionals in the United States, who have tried to explain to me the secret of success in golf. A golf widow and these pages is the result of their mixup.

Niblick.

Hints To Golfers
-Chapter I. Golf In General
Golf is probably the most scientific of all out-door games, requiring as much accuracy of stroke as tennis and far more judgment than cricket or base-ball. The fascination which makes it the game of a...
-Golf Balls
When leather golf balls were used, golf was an expensive game to play as the leather was easily cut by the club head. Golf then was largely a game of the nobility and gentry and was known as The Roya...
-Technical Words
The handle of the club is the shaft and the part bound with leather, the grip. The other end of the club is the head ; the under portion of the head, the sole; the part which comes in contact with the...
-The Driver
The driver, which is used to get distance, is the longest and most delicately constructed club in a golfer's kit and is the evolution of generations of experiments. Many golfers carry two drivers, one...
-Weight, Balance, and Spring
In purchasing a driver one must consider the amount of suppleness and flexibility in the shaft and also where that flexibility is located. A fine, steely spring is what is wanted ; or just enough spri...
-The Bulger
The bulger is a driver with the face convexed like a cricket bat, this convex face being thought to prevent a sliced ball, if hit on the heel, flying to the right. By the laws of dynamics, the directi...
-The Brassy
The brassy is a driver which is used when the ordinary driver cannot get at the ball. As good golfing with a brassy means clipping the grass behind the ball, the shaft should be shorter and stiffer th...
-The Cleek
The cleek is a club used not only to get distance when the ball has such a lie that a brassy cannot get at it, but also in the dangerous distance of approach when neither a driver nor an approaching i...
-Chapter II. Driving
Driving, which is the most fascinating part of golf, is the most difficult part of the game to master, not only because the momentum of the body and every muscle must enter into the stroke, but becaus...
-The Stance
To drive a ball so that it will get distance, one must swing the club properly, which can only be done by having a proper stance. All golfers know what a proper swing means, and those who have not p...
-Holding The Club
In driving, one should not check the swing with the concussion of the club head with the ball It is not hitting the ball as a hammer hits a nail, but sweeping the club head on to the ball, or a swipe...
-Addressing The Ball
Addressing the ball, or the position taken before making the swing, not only means the position of the body and the feet, the bend of the knees and the weight of the body on the legs, but also the way...
-The Preliminary Waggle
To satisfy yourself that the whole machinery of the body is properly adjusted, to feel that the wrists, arms, and shoulders are working freely, that the left leg is carrying easily the weight of the b...
-The Swing Of The Club. The Backward Swing
As it is one of the laws of dynamics that the forward swing will be in the same arc as the backward swing, the backward swing is, in a way, a sort of preliminary canter. 1. In swinging the club bac...
-The Forward Swing
1. With the beginning of the forward swing the body should begin to turn to the left, the left shoulder coming around well up, the right shoulder swinging well down so that the right arm will follow t...
-The Follow Through
Instantaneous photographs of the qol-low through or the continuation of the swing after the concussion, prove that the ball remains upon the face of the club head an appreciable instant after it has...
-Keeping the Eye on the Back of the Ball
As the eye dictates to the mind the movement of the muscles, never keep the eye on the top of the ball but on the back of it and on the ground behind it, so that the sole of the club shall graze the g...
-Summary of the Driving Stroke
Stand with the body facing the ball, both feet firmly on the ground, the ball to the left of the left foot, the knees a little bent, the body bending a little forward, and the weight of the body large...
-Chapter III. Curve On The Ball. Slicing
Slicing is bringing the club head across the line of flight with the forward swing so that a left to right spin is given the ball. This is done either by pulling in the arms with the concussion, or...
-Pulling
A ball hit squarely in the centre will fly either straight ahead or, because of a slice, to the right; while a ball hit to the right of the centre, if only a hair's breadth, will fly tc the left or is...
-Topping
Topping is hitting the ball above the centre and the higher it is hit the more it will be driven into the ground with a loss of momentum. In the same way that a billiard ball, with right hand side...
-Chapter IV. The Wind And Hills
Utilizing the Wind When there is no wind a ball may be sliced or pulled without any great loss of distance, but in a wind the slightest inaccuracy becomes ten times exaggerated and the amateur ofte...
-Cross Winds
In the same way that the skipper makes every breath of air push his boat ahead, so the expert golfer can make some cross winds help the flight of his ball and in a way which to an amateur is often a m...
-Side Hill Lies
A side hill lie is one most trying to an amateur, yet it is one which an expert would often select. With such a lie, because of the unnatural and unsteady stance, it is better to play with the ball op...
-Chapter V. Approaching
One difference between a first-class and a second-class golfer is the inability of the latter to make approach shots, as the average golfer gives most of his time to perfecting himself in driving, in ...
-Suggestions Applying to all Approach Shots
Before making the swing, rest the club head for a moment close behind the ball. Make every approach shot deliberately, because in using a short handled club one is apt to swing the club around the ...
-The Full Swing
With a full swing from 80 to 130 yards is the distance which, according to the skill of the player, the ball should be sent. In making the stroke : (1) Stand facing the line of flight and more over...
-The Three-quarter Swing
For most players, a ball no yards from the hole is at a very unsatisfactory distance, being too far away for a half iron shot and not far enough for a full shot. The distance, then, between 70 and no ...
-The Half Swing
When the hole is less than 90 and more than 40 yards away, the distance is regu -lated, according to the skill of the player, by shortening the swing from a three quarter swing down to a half swing. ...
-The Quarter Swing
When a ball is less than 40 yards from the hole and the ground is smooth, a wooden putter is often used or a running approach shot made with a cleek. But when the ground is rough or a bunker guards th...
-The Wrist Swing
The wrist shot is a stroke which many otherwise good players never acquire, a stroke especially useful when the ground is too rough to use a putter, or when a bunker is in front of the ball and there ...
-The Bent Arm Stroke or the Lofting Approach Stroke
The Bent Arm Stroke or the Lofting Approach Stroke which does not give a Run to the Ball To make a ball fall dead one must pitch it high enough into the air to make it come down perpendicularly and...
-Differences between Stiff and Bent Arm Strokes
For all stiff' arm strokes, one stands with the ball to the left of the centre of the body, the club head swinging backward along the ground as far as the arms can carry it with a pendulum movement. F...
-Summary Of Both Strokes
The Stance For the quarter iron and wrist shot, one should stand well over the ball, the distance one stands from the ball increasing as one plays a half, three quarter or a full iron stroke. For t...
-The Cutting Approach Stroke
If one sweeps the club away from the body with the backward swing so that with the forward swing it cuts diagonally across the line of flight, one can make the ball bite into the ground and fall dead ...
-The Running Approach Stroke
Unlike all other approaching strokes a running approach stroke keeps the ball close to the ground, the essence of the stroke being to give it no spin. This is done by hitting it squarely in the centre...
-High Grass
In playing a ball out of high grass, a good pair of shoulders, a strong pair of arms, and a good thug at the ball are the things needed. That the club may cut through as little grass as possible and t...
-Playing Over Bunkers
When a bunker is so high that distance is not to be considered, use a half swing because more accurate than a full swing. Stand, therefore, half facing the hole with the ball on a line with the left f...
-Sand
In playing out of sand the looser the sand the further back of the ball one should swing the club into it so that the momentum put into the stroke will not expend itself beyond the ball. As the essenc...
-Chapter VI. Putting
Although approaching shots are perhaps the most difficult ones to make, yet in nine out of ten games putting is what wins or loses the hole. For this reason, Tom Sayers, a celebrated professional, use...
-Putting off the Right Leg
(1) Stand well over the ball but not so close that the sole of the putter is not squarely on the ground, standing with the body, head and ball in the same vertical plane, the feet far enough apart to ...
-Putting off the Left Leg
(1) Grasp the shaft the same as when playing off the right leg, the left foot pointing to the left of the ball, with the heel opposite the ball, the right foot well back and turned out, the knees a li...
-Putting with a Cleek or Putting Cleek
As the putter is a short club which requires a different adjustment of the body for the swing than when playing with any other club, the more one's putter resembles an iron the more naturally will one...
-Suggestions in General
Make up your mind to hit the ball clean and to hit it with confidence ; one part of confidence being worth two parts of care. Remember that the hole is large if played for boldly. Do not jerk th...
-Stimies
In playing a stimie, one either has to play over the other ball or around it. If the balls are from seven inches to a foot apart and the further ball two feet or more from the hole, the hole can be ma...
-In Playing Over a Stimie
(1) Use either a lofter, a mashie, or a niblick and the more the face is laid back the more certainty will there be of getting a quick loft on the ball. Although the niblick will make the ball rise qu...
-Chapter VII. The Mental Part Of Golf
Not only in golf, but in every game which is based on physical movements, there is always an element of chance or luck which is more or less demoralizing; but, in golf, losing a hole instead of winnin...
-Carelessness
Almost all golfers at the beginning of a match have latent in their minds the thought that, with eighteen holes to play, the first few holes are of little account, and the fact that many a golfer is h...
-Nervousness in Golf
Most golfers do not appreciate to what an extent the mind is affected by the little incidents which come up in the course of every game, or how much the mind affects the nerves and the nerves the stro...
-Things Worth Remembering
To get on in golf, be thoughtful. Try to discover what your errors are and when you make a good stroke think how you did it. Grasp the leather lower down when your clubs run away with you as this h...
-Golf Don'ts
Don't refuse to play with one whose handicap is much greater than yours or press a game upon one whose handicap is much less. Don't, when making a match, try to get greater odds by saying that your...







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