Most of the other streets and alleys of Palermo resemble similar passageways in Naples. Not one of the five senses is likely to be gratified in any of them, after the novelty of the first inspection is exhausted. In general, they may be called a combination of market place and laundry. For while, below, an endless series of small handcarts winds along, announced by harsh, discordant cries, above them, as a rule, one sees the family washing of the different stories stretched from house to house, or hung like banners on projecting poles, till many a narrow alley seems to be as overburdened with white linen as a racing yacht, half buried under its cloud of sails. Numerous balconies are a conspicuous feature of Sicilian houses. Not only do these serve as posts of general observation; they also form convenient coigns of vantage from which a wife can bargain with itinerant merchants at a safe distance. If the trade is made, the woman lowers a basket with the money, and in return hauls up her purchase to the balcony. Meanwhile, the entire neighborhood hears the whole transaction, and frequently takes part in it. The squalor of Palermo is of course offensive, but on the whole is less distressing than the misery in many towns in northern Europe; for where grime, fog, and cold are added to the rags and hunger of the poor, the sight is more heartbreaking than in sunny lands. There is, moreover, a certain pictur-esqueness in Palermo's poverty. Thus, though the dwellings of the poor reminded me of those which I had seen in Mexico, consisting, as they often did, of only one room opening, win-dowless, upon the street, one usually sees there several pictures and a tiny lamp, which burns before the image of the Virgin or a patron saint. In case the occupant is the fortunate possessor of two rooms, the front one serves as shop or workroom, the inner one - almost devoid of daylight - as the common bedroom of the family.

A Sicilian Maccaroni Shop.

A Sicilian Maccaroni Shop.

The Opera House, Palermo.

The Opera House, Palermo.

A Vendor Of Jars.

A Vendor Of Jars.

A Characteristic Palermo Scene.

A Characteristic Palermo Scene.

In general, therefore, life in Palermo does not differ much from that of most Italian cities; and while it would be novel and amusing to any one going directly thither from America or England, it hardly calls for special notice, when one has seen the thoroughfares of Genoa or Naples.

Poor, But Proud.

Poor, But Proud.

One characteristic of the city deserves, however, special mention. I had not been in Palermo half an hour before my attention was attracted to the most extraordinary carts that I had ever seen. Imagine a square box, painted within and without in such a vivid yellow that one might fancy it encased in lemon peel. This box is mounted upon yellow wheels, and held in place by no less yellow shafts; but, happily, this otherwise excessive monochrome forms merely the groundwork for pictorial effects. Not only are the axles, wheels, and shafts elaborately carved; they are adorned with rings and stripes of red and green, while on the four sides of the cart are painted either portraits, allegorical figures, or representations of historic incidents, which are not merely curious specimens of artistic skill, but soon astonish the beholder by the number, variety, and character of the subjects chosen for so strange a purpose. It is really worth one's while to examine a few of these vehicles, if only to convince oneself of the versatility and even the erudition of their decorators. Thus, in a list of subjects which I made from some of the carts that I encountered in my saun-terings, I find enumerated the Burning of Troy; the Landing in Sicily of Virgil's hero Æneas; Ulysses and the Cyclops; the Seizure of Persephone by Pluto; the Entry into Jerusalem by the Crusaders; the Murder of Julius Caesar the Shooting of the Apple by William Tell; and a continued story of Columbus in four acts, portraying him respectively as a suppliant at the Court of Spain, a recipient of the Queen's crown jewels, the discoverer of the New World, and finally as exhibiting some American Indians to Ferdinand and Isabella. I also found on not a few of these perambulating picture galleries a choice selection of Old Testament stories, such as Daniel in the Lions' Den, the Tower of Babel, and Jonah and the Whale. Perhaps even more remarkable were the portraits painted on the sides, among which I discerned most frequently the lineaments of Julius Caesar, Richard the Lion Hearted, Saladin, Charlemagne, Napoleon, Victor Emmanuel, Garibaldi, and Abraham Lincoln. I am convinced, however, that my list does not include one tenth of the scenes and personalities thus portrayed, for I was always finding something new upon these little carts, which pass from dawn till dusk through all the thoroughfares of Palermo.