Bangor, a city and seaport of Carnarvonshire, on the Menai Strait, 60 miles W. of Chester by the main railway route from London to Dublin (1850). Its chief trade is derived from the great Penrhyn slate-quarries, 5 miles distant, which employ 2000 men. Bangor unites with Carnarvon, etc. in sending one member. In 525 St Deiniol founded a college here; and in 550 he became the first bishop; his cathedral was thrice destroyed, in 1071, 1282, and 1402. The present cruciform edifice (1496-1532) was ' unequalled in meanness,' until in 1869-80 it was restored by Sir Gilbert Scott. In 1883 Bangor received a municipal charter, and the University College of North Wales was opened here in 1884. Pop. (1851) 6338; (1891) 9892; (1901) 11,269.

Bangor

Bangor, a small seaport and watering-place in County Down, on the south side of the entrance to Belfast Lough, 12 miles ENE. of Belfast. Pop. 5903. St Cungall in 555 founded Bangor Abbey, which in the 9th century had 3000 inmates. See a monograph by the Rev. C. Scott (2d ed. Belfast, 1887).

Bangor

Bangor, a city and port in the state of Maine, 246 miles NE. of Boston by rail, on the Penobscot, 60 miles from its mouth, and at its confluence with the Kenduskeag, which affords extensive water-power. At spring-tides, here rising 17 feet, the harbour is accessible for the largest vessels, and as the navigation cannot go higher, Bangor is one of the largest lumber depots in the world. Under English rule the place was known as Kenduskeag; its present name was taken from the well-known psalm-tune, a favourite of one of its ministers, Seth Noble. It was incorporated as a city in 1834. Pop. (1870) 18,289; (1880) 16,856; (1890) 19,103; (1900) 21,850.