Flint, the county town of Flintshire, North Wales, on the left side of the Dee's estuary, 13 miles NW. of Chester. In the vicinity are extensive alkali-works, besides copper-works, collieries, and lead-mines. Pop. (1851) 3296; (1901) 4625. It unites with Caergwrle, Caerwys, Holywell, Mold, Overton, Rhuddlan, and St Asaph to return one member. Flint Castle, built by Edward I., was captured by the parliament in 1643, and dismantled in 1647. Here Richard II. surrendered to Bolingbroke, 19th August 1399. See Taylor's History of Flint (1873).

Flint

Flint, a maritime county of North Wales, bounded NE. by the river Dee, and N. by the Irish Sea. The main portion of the county is 26 miles long by 10 to 12 broad, and the detached hundred of Maelor, lying 8 miles SE. of the main part, measures 9 miles by 5. Area, 289 sq. m. The coast is low and sandy, but along the Dee estuary fertile. The county is bisected by a low range of hills stretching almost due north. Coal, iron, lead, copper, calamine, zinc, and limestone are the chief mineral products. There are numerous well-watered and picturesque valleys. The uplands afford good pasturage. The Dee in the east and the Clwyd in the west of the county are the principal rivers. Pop. (1801) 39,469; (18S1) 80,587; (1901) 81,725. Flintshire returns one member to parliament. The chief towns are Flint, Mold, St Asaph, Holywell, and Hawarden.

Flint

Flint, capital of Genesee county, Michigan, on the Flint River, 64 miles NNW. of Detroit by rail, with sawmills and manufactures of beer, flour, bricks, paper, machinery, etc. Pop. 13,100.