Jura (Scand. deor-oe, ' deer-isle'), an Argyllshire island, 1/2 mile NE. of Islay, and 2 1/2 miles W. of the nearest point of the mainland. It extends 28 miles north-eastward; varies in width from 3/4 mile, at Loch Tarbert in the middle, to 8 1/2 miles; and is 143 sq. m. in area. The western side is rugged and desolate, the eastern green and pleasing. The conical Paps of Jura are 2571 and 2412 feet high ; and most of the surface is deer-forest. Pop.(1831) 1312 ; (1901) 560.

Jura

Jura, a range of mountains of a peculiar limestone formation, oolitic in composition, and generally called Jurassic, which extends from the angle formed by the Rhone and the Ain, in a northeasterly direction (with a gradually declining elevation) for more than 450 miles, to the upper course of the Main. But it is usual to restrict the name to the ranges that lie along the frontier of Switzerland and France - mainly in the deps. of Doubs, Jura, and Ain. These constitute a plateau about 155 miles long by 40 wide, with an average height of 2000 to 2500 feet. The loftiest peaks are Reculet (5643 feet), Cret de la Neige (2653), Mont Tendre (5512), and D61e (5507).

Jura

Jura, an eastern French dep., bounded on the E. by Switzerland. Area, 1928 sq. m.; pop. (1881) 285,263; (1901) 261,288. It is divided into the four arrondissements of Lons-le-Saunier (the capital), Poligny, Sainte-Claude, and Dole.