Newport, (1) the capital of the Isle of Wight, on the navigable Medina, near the centre of the island, 4 1/2 miles S. of Cowes and 10 SW. of Ryde. The church, rebuilt in 1854-56 on the site of one nearly 700 years old, is a fine Decorated edifice, and contains Marochetti's beautiful monument, erected by Queen Victoria in memory of the Princess Elizabeth (died at Carisbrooke Castle in 1650). Newport besides has a town-hall (1810); a free grammar-school (1612), the scene in 1648 of the fruitless negotiations between the parliament and Charles I. ; a girls' endowed school (1761); a diocesan school (1860); and a literary institute and museum. To the north-west are a reformatory (1838) and barracks (1798). A municipal borough, Newport returned two members till 1867, and then one till 1885. Pop. (1851) 8047; (1901) 10,911. - (2) A thriving town of Monmouthshire, and a parliamentary, municipal, and county borough (the first conjointly with Monmouth and Usk), is seated on the river Usk, about 4 miles from its mouth, 24 miles SSW. of Monmouth and 145 W. of London. A principal outlet for great collieries and iron and steel works, it has greatly increased its shipping trade and its dock accommodation, which covers more than 80 acres. Amongst its public buildings are the town-hall (1885), erected at a cost of 30,000, and St Woollos' Church, partly Norman and partly Perpendicular. Newport manufactures india-rubber, gutta-percha, and railway and telegraph plant and wagons, and has brass and iron foundries, breweries, potteries. In 1839 the town was the centre of a Chartist outbreak. Pop. (1801) 1087 ; (1881) 38,427 ; (1901) 67,270. - (3) A market-town of Shropshire, on the Shrewsbury Canal, 11 miles WSW. of Stafford. Chartered by Henry I., and burned in 1665, it has a 15th-century chinch, a grammar-school (1656), and manufactures of machinery and agricultural implements. Population, 3500. - (4) A town of Pembrokeshire, on Newport Bay, 6 miles E. by N. of Fishguard. Pop. 1337.

Newport

Newport, a town of Fife, on the Firth of Tay, l 1/2 mile by water SSE. of Dundee. It has a small harbour designed by Telford (1822), and municipal buildings (1890). Pop. 3000.

Newport

Newport, (1) a watering-place of County Mayo, 11 miles NW. of Castlebar. Pop. 578. - (2) A town of Tipperary, on the Mulkear, 11 miles NE. of Limerick. Pop. 637.

Newport

Newport, (1) capital of Campbell county, Kentucky, is on the Ohio, opposite Cincinnati, and at the mouth of the Licking River, which separates it from Covington. The city contains large rolling-mills, a foundry, bolt-works, tile-works, and steam-mills. Pop.'(1880) 15,693 ; (1900) 28,301. - (2) Fourth of the cities of Rhode Island, on the west shore of the island of Rhode Island, in Narragansett Bay, 5 miles from the ocean, and 69 miles by rail S. by W. of Boston. It has a deep, excellent harbour, defended by Fort Adams, and a torpedo station; also cotton-mills, a brass-foundry, lead and fish-oil works, etc. There are a brick state-house, a custom-house, a city-hall, the Redwood Library, many palatial villas, and large hotels; it is one of the most fashionable watering-places in America. In Touro Park stands the 'Round Tower,' or 'Old Stone Mill,' which suggested Longfellow's ' Skeleton in Armour.' It was settled in 1638 by eighteen adherents of Roger Williams; Bishop Berkeley resided here. Till 1900 it shared with Providence the dignity of capital of the state. Pop. (1880) 15,693 ; (1890) 19,457 ; (1900) 22,034.