Trent, a river of central England, the third in length, rising on Biddulph Moor, NW. Staffordshire, and flowing 150 miles SE. and NE. through the counties of Stafford, Derby, Leicester, Nottingham, and Lincoln, till it unites with the Ouse to form the Humber, 15 miles W. of Hull. It receives on the right the Sow, Tame, Soar, and Devon, and on the left the Blythe, Dove, and Derwent; passes Burton, Nottingham, Newark, and Gainsborough; and is navigable for barges to Burton (117 miles), for vessels of 200 tons to Gainsborough (25). Canals connect it with many great Midland towns. See Cassell's Rivers of England (1889).

Trent

Trent, a small lake flowing by the Trent River into Lake Ontario. By this valley it has been proposed to connect the Georgian Bay of Lake Huron with Lake Ontario (197 miles).

Trent

Trent (Ital. Trento; Ger. Trient; Lat. Triden-tum), a town of Austria, in the S. Tyrol, on the Adige's left bank, 145 miles by rail SSW. of Innsbruck and 59 N. of Verona. The cathedral, begun in 1212, is a beautiful specimen of Lombard Romanesque. The church of Santa Maria Mag-giore (15th c.) was the meeting-place (1545-63) of the famous Council. Other buildings are the former Jesuits' church, ornamented with the richest marbles; the theatre; the town-hall; some noble private mansions; and the feudal Palazzo Buonconsiglio adjoining the town, now a barrack. Trent manufactures silks, wine, pottery, confections, and sugar, and has a brisk transit trade. The population is now about 25,000. Italian from 1809 to 1813, Trent is still quite Italian in aspect, language, and habits; and the restoration to Italy of it and the Trentino (district of Trent), with Trieste, is the chief aim of the ' Italia Irredenta' agitation in Italy.