Vienne, a dep. of W. France, formed mainly out of Poitou. Area, 2691 sq. m.; pop. (1881) 340,295; (1901) 333,896. The Vienne, an affluent of the Loire, is the chief river. The arrondisse-ments are Poitiers (the capital), Chatellerault, Civray, Loudun, Montmorillon.

Vienne

Vienne (Vee-enn'), a town in the French dep. of Isere (far away from that of Vienne), on the Rhone's left bank, 19 miles S. of Lyons by rail, where the Gere joins the Rhone. Vienne was the chief town of the Allobroges, and in the time of the Roman empire the rival of Lyons. Besides water-conduits, etc., of Roman construetion, there are a Corinthian temple, remains of a theatre, and an obelisk, called L'Aiguille, 72 feet high. The archiepiscopal cathedral was built in 1107-1251; St Peter's dates from the 6th c. In a council held here (1312) Pope Clement V. suppressed the Templars. Vienne manufactures woollens, silk, paper, leather, and iron goods. Pop. (1872) 21,430; (1901) 22,770.

Vienne

Vienne, Haute, a French dep. SE. of Vienne. Area, 2130 sq. m.; pop. (1872) 322,447; (1901) 374,212. The arrondissements are Limoges (the capital), Bellac, Rochechouart, and Saint-Yrieix.