The Red Cedar is a most beautiful tree. Its growth is naturally pyramidal, but when found near the coast it is often twisted into the most fantastic and weird forms. If your place is bare of Cedars it would hardly be worth while to plant them, their development is so exasperatingly slow; but if Nature has thrown any of them in your way be most careful to preserve them as they give much character to the surroundings. They are to be found growing in the most absurd places, where it would be impossible to establish any other form of tree, or even Cedar itself by transplantation, on the tops of rocks with apparently no soil in sight, tentacled around stones like petrified devil-fish, out of the clefts of rocks where birds have dropped the seeds, very often hanging from the face of a cliff or boulder. They are natural formalities of the landscape that can be made the basis of semi-formal plans. Although it is possible to transplant these trees when they are found growing freely in loam and not with their roots forced into the clefts of rocks, the risk is great, especially if the tree has attained sufficient age to make it attractive; and the operation is not recommended to amateurs.

In Winter the well-defined outlines of the Cedar trees stand out with clearness against the snow, the dark green foliage showing a little subdued and rusty in the frosty air. Dignified in the extreme, they do not lower one's cheerfulness like the funereal Spruce. In some parts of the South, Maryland and Virginia particularly, one notices the Cedars lining the lanes as if they had been carefully planted, when the birds perching on the near-by fences are entirely responsible for their appearance. These trees are very beautiful when located on a terrace among flowers. The green of their foliage is of much the same colour as the English Yew and it sets off most effectively such bright blooming plants as Phlox, or Foxgloves and Lilies. This tree is so desirable that if you have any well-shaped specimens it would be a good plan to work up your grounds and garden to them.

Cedar growing on Top of Rock.

Cedar growing on Top of Rock.

Spruce, Pine, and Cedar.

Spruce, Pine, and Cedar.

Group of Cedars

Group of Cedars.

The Japanese evergreens that are planted so much nowadays are very attractive, but their use should be confined to Japanese gardens or to Japanese effects in large parks or gardens. The majority of them are quite hardy, but if the thermometer goes below zero the Retinisporas, the most beautiful of them all, will be killed.

Red Cedars on the Lawn.

Red Cedars on the Lawn.