The design of the Morris chair is one that will appeal to the amateur craftsman, not only on account of its unique features, but because of its simple method of construction. The illustration shows the chair with the cushions removed, in order to plainly show the construction. The cut, therefore, fails to give an adequate idea of the comfortable appearance of the chair when in use. The arm-rests at either side form the lids of two long, narrow boxes, which open outward. Many uses will suggest themselves for these convenient little boxes. They will hold pipes and tobacco, writing materials, knitting or fancy-work, and so on.

How To Make A Morris Chair 143How To Make A Morris Chair 144

First proceed with the ends, which are flared out at their upper ends so as to form the ends of the boxes. Each leg has but one mortise, and that through the shortest direction. After these have been prepared, the rear legs should be notched out at their upper inward corners, so that the two inner sides of the boxes can project to the rear, for the purpose of supporting the back, as shown. Four one-inch blocks of the exact size of the inside of the boxes should now be made, and fastened with screws to the upper ends of the legs, so that the sides and bottoms of the boxes may be fastened thereto. Next get out the two side crosspieces and tenon them to fit the mortises already made in the legs. The two inner sides of the boxes should now be prepared, and their ends, which project out behind, should each receive five notches, for holding the movable bar that holds the back up. After getting out the outer sides and bottoms of the boxes, the two entire sides of the chair may be assembled. Use good, fresh glue, supplementing it with screws, in connecting the box pieces with the legs. The front and back crosspieces require only trimming up true and square. In the sketch is shown how to connect these to the two sides already assembled. To support the seat, five three-fourths-by-two-inch slats are nailed to two one-inch strips screwed to the inside of the two side crosspieces. The back frame consists of two tapering side pieces and five cross-bars, all of which are mortised together. These mortises are let into the side pieces of the frame for a depth of one inch, and should be set up with glue and two wire nails through each connection. To connect this frame to the back crosspiece use two stout iron hinges. The adjusting bar to regulate the angle of the back should be of hardwood or metal. The cushions may be ordered ready made in Spanish or imitation leather. If it is desired to make these at home, which is no great task, as several easily-worked materials may be used, one should first examine some of the various methods of putting these cushions together.

How To Make A Morris Chair 145

Mill Bill

NO. OF PIECES

DIMENSIONS

4

1 1/4

X

6V4

X

30

2

1 1/4

X

6 1/4

X

30

2

l

X

6 1/4

X

28

2

1

X

5

X

40

2

3/4

X

5

X

26 1/2

2

3/4

X

6 1/4

X

30

2

3/4

X

4 1/2

X

26 1/2

2

l 3/4

X

2

X

36

1

3/4

X

3 1/2

X

23

3

3/4

X

2

X

23

1

1 1/4

X

3

X

23

5

3/4

X

2

X

27

How To Make A Morris Chair #2

The illustration of the Morris chair does not give any adequate idea of its roomy comfort, since the two large cushions are not shown. The arm-rests are quite low and very wide, thus providing ample space for a book or writing-paper. The angle of the back is easily adjusted by moving two loosely-fitting pegs, which are set into holes bored in the rearward projecting ends of the arm-rests.

How To Make A Morris Chair 159

The making of this chair should commence with the four legs, which are all of a length and similarly cut down on their upper ends so as to pass through and support the arm-rests. The long, narrow mortises for the crosspieces should be very accurately marked off and cut from both sides with a sharp chisel. Next proceed with the arm-rests, cutting the two square holes in each, and then bore the eight holes for the adjusting pegs. The two side cross-pieces are now in order, and must be carefully tenoned to fit the mortises already made in the legs. On the under side of the arm-rests and on the upper edges of these crosspieces cut the mortises for the side slats, which should then be gotten out and tenoned to a uniform length. We are now ready to assemble the two entire sides of our chair, which should be set up with glue and firmly clamped for about eight hours. The front and back crosspieces may now be gotten out, and the two sides connected. The back frame consists of two slightly-tapering side pieces and five cross-bars tenoned into the side pieces for a depth of one inch. Set up with glue, and through each connection drive a couple of wire nails with the heads carefully set. Attach this frame to the back crosspiece with two stout hinges. To support the seat-cushions, two-by-three-fourths-inch slats should be arranged as shown. These slats rest on two one-inch-square strips which are screwed to the inside of the front and back crosspieces. The cushions may be ordered already made, or they may be made at home from one of the several available materials. There are several methods of sewing up a cushion for such a chair as this, but as this is hardly within the scope of this article, the writer would suggest that those who have had no experience in this line examine some cushions at the furniture-store.

How To Make A Morris Chair 160

Mill Bill

NO. OF PIECES

DIMENSIONS

4

2 1/2

X

2 1/2

X

27

2

1 1/4

X

6 1/4

X

29 1/2

2

1 1/4

X

5 1/4

X

30 1/2

2

1 1/4

X

6 1/4

X

40 1/2

2

1 3/4

X

2

X

33 1/2

1

3/4

X

3 1/2

X

21

3

3/4

X

2

X

21

1

1 1/4

X

3

X

21

NO. OF PIECES

DIMENSIONS

8

1/2

X

3

X

19

5

%

X

2

X

26

2

l

X

1

X

24,