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The Moonstone. A Romance | by Wilkie Collins



"The first and greatest of English detective novels." --T. S. Eliot

TitleThe Moonstone. A Romance
AuthorWilkie Collins
PublisherBernhard Tauchnitz
Year1868
Copyright1868, Bernhard Tauchnitz
AmazonThe Moonstone
-Prologue. The Storming Of Seringapatam (1799)
Extracted from a Family Paper I address these lines - written in India - to my relatives in England. My object is to explain the motive which has induced me to refuse the right hand of friendship to...
-Prologue. The Storming Of Seringapatam (1799). Continued
Let me now take you on to the day of the assault. My cousin and I were separated at the outset. I never saw him when we forded the river; when we planted the English flag in the first breach; when we ...
-The Story. First Period. The Loss Of The Diamond (1848)
The events related by GABRIEL BETTEREDGE, house-steward in the service of JULIA, LADY VERINDER. First Period. Chapter I In the first part of ROBINSON CRUSOE, at page one hundred and twenty-nine, you...
-First Period. Chapter II
I spoke of my lady a line or two back. Now the Diamond could never have been in our house, where it was lost, if it had not been made a present of to my lady's daughter; and my lady's daughter would n...
-First Period. Chapter III
The question of how I am to start the story properly I have tried to settle in two ways. First, by scratching my head, which led to nothing. Second, by consulting my daughter Penelope, which has resul...
-First Period. Chapter III. Continued
The Thursday was as fine a summer's day as ever you saw: and my lady and Miss Rachel (not expecting Mr. Franklin till dinner-time) drove out to lunch with some friends in the neighbourhood. When they...
-First Period. Chapter IV
I am truly sorry to detain you over me and my beehive chair. A sleepy old man, in a sunny back yard, is not an interesting object, I am well aware. But things must be put down in their places, as thin...
-First Period. Chapter IV. Part 2
Having now told the story of Rosanna, I have only to notice one of the many queer ways of this strange girl to get on next to the story of the sands. Our house is high up on the Yorkshire coast, and ...
-First Period. Chapter IV. Part 3
There's roast mutton and suet-pudding waiting for you! says I. Go in to dinner directly. This is what comes, Rosanna, of thinking on an empty stomach! I spoke severely, being naturally indignant (...
-First Period. Chapter V
The first thing I did, after we were left together alone, was to make a third attempt to get up from my seat on the sand. Mr. Franklin stopped me. There is one advantage about this horrid place, he...
-First Period. Chapter V. Continued
I spoke, a little way back, of my lady's father, the old lord with the short temper and the long tongue. He had five children in all. Two sons to begin with; then, after a long time, his wife broke ou...
-First Period. Chapter VI
Keeping my private sentiments to myself, I respectfully requested Mr. Franklin to go on. Mr. Franklin replied, Don't fidget, Betteredge, and went on. Our young gentleman's first words informed me t...
-First Period. Chapter VI. Part 2
Did the Colonel give any reason, sir, I inquired, why he left the Diamond to Miss Rachel? He not only gave the reason - he had the reason written in his will, said Mr. Franklin. I have got an ...
-First Period. Chapter VI. Part 3
Neither he nor I seemed to fancy dealing with this part of the inquiry. We looked at each other, and then we looked at the tide, oozing in smoothly, higher and higher, over the Shivering Sand. What ...
-First Period. Chapter VI. Part 4
No, sir. What's your interpretation, if you please? I can see, says Mr. Franklin, that the Colonel's object may, quite possibly, have been - not to benefit his niece, whom he had never even seen...
-First Period. Chapter VII
While I was in this bewildered frame of mind, sorely needing a little quiet time by myself to put me right again, my daughter Penelope got in my way (just as her late mother used to get in my way on t...
-First Period. Chapter VIII
Here, for one moment, I find it necessary to call a halt. On summoning up my own recollections - and on getting Penelope to help me, by consulting her journal - I find that we may pass pretty rapidly...
-First Period. Chapter VIII. Part 2
As for Mr. Franklin and Miss Rachel, they tortured nothing, I am glad to say. They simply confined themselves to making a mess; and all they spoilt, to do them justice, was the panelling of a door. M...
-First Period. Chapter VIII. Part 3
I have now brought you acquainted with Miss Rachel, which you will find puts us face to face, next, with the question of that young lady's matrimonial views. On June the twelfth, an invitation from m...
-First Period. Chapter VIII. Part 4
June the sixteenth brought an event which made Mr. Franklin's chance look, to my mind, a worse chance than ever. A strange gentleman, speaking English with a foreign accent, came that morning to the ...
-First Period. Chapter IX
June twenty-first, the day of the birthday, was cloudy and unsettled at sunrise, but towards noon it cleared up bravely. We, in the servants' hall, began this happy anniversary, as usual, by offering...
-First Period. Chapter IX. Continued
There stood Miss Rachel at the table, like a person fascinated, with the Colonel's unlucky Diamond in her hand. There, on either side of her, knelt the two Bouncers, devouring the jewel with their eye...
-First Period. Chapter X
One on the top of the other the rest of the company followed the Ablewhites, till we had the whole tale of them complete. Including the family, they were twenty-four in all. It was a noble sight to se...
-First Period. Chapter X. Part 2
They have got some remarkably fine skeletons lately at the College of Surgeons, says Mr. Candy, across the table, in a loud cheerful voice. I strongly recommend the Professor, ma'am, when he next h...
-First Period. Chapter X. Part 3
I had just ranged the decanters in a row before old Mr. Ablewhite (who represented the master of the house), when there came a sound from the terrace which, startled me out of my company manners on th...
-First Period. Chapter X. Part 4
Broad daylight, says Mr. Franklin. And plenty of people in the streets? Plenty. You settled, of course, to arrive at Lady Verinder's house at a certain time? It's a lonely country between th...
-First Period. Chapter XI
When the last of the guests had driven away, I went back into the inner hall and found Samuel at the side-table, presiding over the brandy and soda-water. My lady and Miss Rachel came out of the drawi...
-First Period. Chapter XI. Part 2
About half-past seven I woke, and opened my window on a fine sunshiny day. The clock had struck eight, and I was just going out to chain up the dogs again, when I heard a sudden whisking of petticoats...
-First Period. Chapter XI. Part 3
We had our breakfasts - whatever happens in a house, robbery or murder, it doesn't matter, you must have your breakfast. When we had done, my lady sent for me; and I found myself compelled to tell her...
-First Period. Chapter XI. Part 4
He began by going round the premises, outside and in; the result of that investigation proving to him that no thieves had broken in upon us from outside, and that the robbery, consequently, must have ...
-First Period. Chapter XI. Part 5
In a rage, one moment; in tears, the next! What did it mean? I told the Superintendent it meant that Miss Rachel's temper was upset by the loss of her jewel. Being anxious for the honour of the famil...
-First Period. Chapter XI. Part 6
As I had promised for them, the other servants followed my lead, sorely against the grain, of course, but all taking the view that I took. The women were a sight to see, while the police-officers were...
-First Period. Chapter XI. Part 7
Here was another view of the girl's conduct. If it was possible for Penelope to be right, the explanation of Rosanna's strange language and behaviour might have been all in this - that she didn't care...
-First Period. Chapter XII
The Thursday night passed, and nothing happened. With the Friday morning came two pieces of news. Item the first: the baker's man declared he had met Rosanna Spearman, on the previous afternoon, with...
-First Period. Chapter XII. Part 2
This was a nice sort of man to recover Miss Rachel's Diamond, and to find out the thief who stole it! You seem to be fond of roses, Sergeant? I remarked. I haven't much time to be fond of anythin...
-First Period. Chapter XII. Part 3
Mr. Franklin was as close at hand as could be - waiting for his first chance of being introduced to the great Cuff. In half a minute he was in the room, and was giving his evidence as follows: That ...
-First Period. Chapter XII. Part 4
Mr. Franklin struck in there, Or possibly your daughter, Betteredge. He turned to Sergeant Cuff, and explained that my daughter was Miss Verinder's maid. Mr. Betteredge, ask your daughter to step ...
-First Period. Chapter XIII
I found my lady in her own sitting room. She started and looked annoyed when I mentioned that Sergeant Cuff wished to speak to her. MUST I see him? she asked. Can't you represent me, Gabriel? I ...
-First Period. Chapter XIII. Continued
I reminded my lady here that Mr. Godfrey was going away. As I said the words, Mr. Godfrey himself knocked at the door to say good-bye, and was followed in by Mr. Franklin, who was going with him to th...
-First Period. Chapter XIV
The nearest way to the garden, on going out of my lady's sitting-room, was by the shrubbery path, which you already know of. For the sake of your better understanding of what is now to come, I may add...
-First Period. Chapter XIV. Part 2
I had got on very fairly well with Sergeant Cuff so far. But the slyness with which he slipped in that last question put me on my guard. In plain English, I didn't at all relish the notion of helping ...
-First Period. Chapter XIV. Part 3
Having had some experience of the great Cuff's round-about ways, and having last seen him evidently bent on following Rosanna privately when she went out for her walk, it seemed clear to me that he ha...
-First Period. Chapter XV
The Sergeant remained silent, thinking his own thoughts, till we entered the plantation of firs which led to the quicksand. There he roused himself, like a man whose mind was made up, and spoke to me ...
-First Period. Chapter XV. Part 2
The last of the evening light was fading away; and over all the desolate place there hung a still and awful calm. The heave of the main ocean on the great sandbank out in the bay, was a heave that mad...
-First Period. Chapter XV. Part 3
I sat quiet in a corner, waiting to hear how the Sergeant would find his way to the subject of Rosanna Spearman. His usual roundabout manner of going to work proved, on this occasion, to be more round...
-First Period. Chapter XV. Part 4
Come along! I said, I can't wait any longer: I must go back to the house. I'll follow you directly, says Sergeant Cuff. For the second time, I went to the door; and, for the second time, try a...
-First Period. Chapter XV. Part 5
On hearing those words, the infernal detective-fever began, I suppose, to burn in me again. At any rate, I forgot myself in the interest of guessing this new riddle. I said rashly, The stained dress!...
-First Period. Chapter XVI
We found my lady with no light in the room but the reading-lamp. The shade was screwed down so as to overshadow her face. Instead of looking up at us in her usual straightforward way, she sat close at...
-First Period. Chapter XVI. Part 2
Being restless and miserable, and having no particular room to go to, I took a turn on the terrace, and thought it over in peace and quietness by myself. It doesn't much matter what my thoughts were. ...
-First Period. Chapter XVI. Part 3
She has just passed me, sir, with a very disturbed face, and in a very odd manner. I am afraid I am innocently the cause of that disturbance, Betteredge. You, sir! I can't explain it, says ...
-First Period. Chapter XVII
Nothing happened in the night; and (I am happy to add) no attempt at communication between Miss Rachel and Rosanna rewarded the vigilance of Sergeant Cuff. I had expected the Sergeant to set off for ...
-First Period. Chapter XVII. Continued
Unreasonable enough, no doubt. But it was my state of mind as well. I thoroughly understood him. If you will, for once in your life, remember that you are mortal, perhaps you will thoroughly understan...
-First Period. Chapter XVIII
Going down to the front door, I met the Sergeant on the steps. It went against the grain with me, after what had passed between us, to show him that I felt any sort of interest in his proceedings. In...
-First Period. Chapter XVIII. Continued
Sergeant Cuff was just as quick on his side. He put Samuel back, and stood before Miss Rachel, with the open carriage-door in his hand, at the instant when she settled herself in her place. What do ...
-First Period. Chapter XIX
The news of Rosanna's disappearance had, as it appeared, spread among the out-of-door servants. They too had made their inquiries; and they had just laid hands on a quick little imp, nicknamed Duffy...
-First Period. Chapter XX
Those in front had spread the news before us. We found the servants in a state of panic. As we passed my lady's door, it was thrown open violently from the inner side. My mistress came out among us (w...
-First Period. Chapter XXI
The first words, when we had taken our seats, were spoken by my lady. Sergeant Cuff, she said, there was perhaps some excuse for the inconsiderate manner in which I spoke to you half an hour since...
-First Period. Chapter XXI. Part 2
He considered with himself for a moment, and went on - with a horrid clearness that obliged you to understand him; with an abominable justice that favoured nobody. My first information relating to t...
-First Period. Chapter XXI. Part 3
Here I felt that my professional existence depended on not holding my tongue. To be held up before my mistress, in my old age, as a sort of deputy-policeman, was, once again, more than my Christianity...
-First Period. Chapter XXII
My mistress having left us, I had leisure to think of Sergeant Cuff. I found him sitting in a snug corner of the hall, consulting his memorandum book, and curling up viciously at the corners of the li...
-First Period. Chapter XXII. Part 2
I shook my head at that. Wonderfully clever, I dare say, but my own experience was dead against it. In the time of the late Mrs. Betteredge, I said, I felt pretty often inclined to try your philoso...
-First Period. Chapter XXII. Part 3
If those words meant anything, and if the manner in which he spoke them meant anything - it came to this. My mistress's letter had proved, to his mind, that Miss Rachel was hardened enough to resist t...
-First Period. Chapter XXIII
I had kept the pony chaise ready, in case Mr. Franklin persisted in leaving us by the train that night. The appearance of the luggage, followed downstairs by Mr. Franklin himself, informed me plainly ...
-First Period. Chapter XXIII. Part 2
On the next day (Sunday), the close carriage, which had been kept at Mr. Ablewhite's, came back to us empty. The coachman brought a message for me, and written instructions for my lady's own maid and ...
-First Period. Chapter XXIII. Part 3
Here was another of your average good Christians, and here was the usual break-down, consequent on that same average Christianity being pushed too far! The parson himself (though I own this is saying ...
-First Period. Chapter XXIII. Part 4
My girl's letter informed me that some great London doctor had been consulted about her young lady, and had earned a guinea by remarking that she had better be amused. Flower-shows, operas, balls - th...
-Second Period. The Discovery Of The Truth (1848-1849)
The events related in several narratives. First Narrative. Contributed By Miss Clack; Niece Of The Late Sir John Verinder. Chapter I I am indebted to my dear parents (both now in heaven) for having ...
-Second Period. The Discovery Of The Truth. Part 2
She looked at the title. Is it written by a man or a woman, Miss? If it's written by a woman, I had rather not read it on that account. If it's written by a man, I beg to inform him that he knows not...
-Second Period. The Discovery Of The Truth. Part 3
He was looking at the book, the position of which caused him to stand with his back turned towards the closed folding doors communicating with the front room, when, without the slightest previous nois...
-Second Period. The Discovery Of The Truth. Part 4
Exactly what had happened to Mr. Godfrey in Northumberland Street now happened to Mr. Luker in Alfred Place. Once more the respectable man answered the door, and showed the visitor up-stairs into the ...
-First Narrative. Chapter II
Mr. Godfrey followed the announcement of his name - as Mr. Godfrey does everything else - exactly at the right time. He was not so close on the servant's heels as to startle us. He was not so far behi...
-First Narrative. Chapter II. Part 2
In the meantime, Rachel had settled herself at the window with our amiable and forbearing - our too forbearing - Mr. Godfrey. She began the string of questions with which she had threatened him, takin...
-First Narrative. Chapter II. Part 3
Keep your noble sentiments for your Ladies' Committees, Godfrey. I am certain that the scandal which has assailed Mr. Luker, has not spared You. Even my aunt's torpor was roused by those words. M...
-First Narrative. Chapter II. Part 4
Rachel started, and composed herself. She crossed the room to her mother. They have come to take me to the flower-show, she said. One word, mamma, before I go. I have not distressed you, have I? ...
-First Narrative. Chapter III
Consideration for poor Lady Verinder forbade me even to hint that I had guessed the melancholy truth, before she opened her lips. I waited her pleasure in silence; and, having privately arranged to sa...
-First Narrative. Chapter III. Part 2
I drove home, selected and marked my first series of readings, and drove back to Montagu Square, with a dozen works in a carpet-bag, the like of which, I firmly believe, are not to be found in the lit...
-First Narrative. Chapter III. Part 3
He said those last words, looking so wonderfully wise in his own worldly conceit, that I really (to my shame be it spoken) could not resist leading him a little farther still, before I overwhelmed him...
-First Narrative. Chapter IV
The signing of the Will was a much shorter matter than I had anticipated. It was hurried over, to my thinking, in indecent haste. Samuel, the footman, was sent for to act as second witness - and the p...
-First Narrative. Chapter IV. Part 2
When I folded up my things that night - when I reflected on the true riches which I had scattered with such a lavish hand, from top to bottom of the house of my wealthy aunt - I declare I felt as free...
-First Narrative. Chapter IV. Part 3
Soon after two o'clock I was again on the field of pious conflict, addressing more kind inquiries to Samuel at Lady Verinder's door. My aunt had had a bad night. She was again in the room in which I ...
-First Narrative. Chapter V
My hand dropped from the curtain. But don't suppose - oh, don't suppose - that the dreadful embarrassment of my situation was the uppermost idea in my mind! So fervent still was the sisterly interest ...
-First Narrative. Chapter V. Part 2
You have made your confession, she said. I wonder whether it would cure you of your unhappy attachment to me, if I made mine? He started. I confess I started too. He thought, and I thought, that ...
-First Narrative. Chapter V. Part 3
She began to yield already. Oh, what a bringing-up she must have had! Oh, how differently I should have acted in her place! Don't tempt me, Godfrey, she said; I am wretched enough and reckless eno...
-First Narrative. Chapter VI
(1.) Miss Clack presents her compliments to Mr. Franklin Blake; and, in sending him the fifth chapter of her humble narrative, begs to say that she feels quite unequal to enlarge as she could wish on...
-First Narrative. Chapter VII
The foregoing correspondence will sufficiently explain why no choice is left to me but to pass over Lady Verinder's death with the simple announcement of the fact which ends my fifth chapter. Keeping...
-First Narrative. Chapter VII. Part 2
My face, I suppose, betrayed the astonishment I felt at this. She coloured up for a moment, and then proceeded to explain herself. In my poor mother's lifetime, she went on, her friends were not a...
-First Narrative. Chapter VII. Part 3
Godfrey was very much vexed, Drusilla, not to be able to come with us, said my Aunt Ablewhite. There was something in the way which kept him in town. Mr. Bruff volunteered to take his place, and ma...
-First Narrative. Chapter VII. Part 4
News you were interested in hearing? I repeated. I suppose, my dear Rachel, that must be news of Mr. Godfrey Ablewhite? She started up in the bed, and turned deadly pale. It was evidently on the ...
-First Narrative. Chapter VIII
I have lost a beautiful girl, an excellent social position, and a handsome income, Mr. Godfrey began; and I have submitted to it without a struggle. What can be the motive for such extraordinary co...
-First Narrative. Chapter VIII. Part 2
Let me dry my eyes, and return to my narrative. I went downstairs to luncheon, naturally anxious to see how Rachel was affected by her release from her marriage engagement. It appeared to me - but I...
-First Narrative. Chapter VIII. Part 3
The self-registering thermometer at the top of Mr. Ablewhite's bald head began to indicate a rise of temper. His face was more amiable than ever - but THERE was the pink at the top of his face, a shad...
-First Narrative. Chapter VIII. Part 4
Dear Mr. Ablewhite, I said, one word! When I first attracted the attention of the company by rising, I could see that he was on the point of saying something rude to me. My sisterly form of addre...
-First Narrative. Chapter VIII. Part 5
My dear young lady, he said, Mr. Ablewhite's conduct has naturally shocked you, and taken you by surprise. If it was worth while to contest the question with such a man, we might soon show him that...
-Second Narrative. Contributed By Mathew Bruff, Solicitor, Of Gray's Inn Square. Chapter I
My fair friend, Miss Clack, having laid down the pen, there are two reasons for my taking it up next, in my turn. In the first place, I am in a position to throw the necessary light on certain points...
-Mathew Bruff, Solicitor, Of Gray's Inn Square. Part 2
In about three weeks from that time - as well as I can remember - the first warning reached me of something unusual going on under the surface. I happened to be looking in at my friend the proctor's o...
-Mathew Bruff, Solicitor, Of Gray's Inn Square. Part 3
My doubts ended in my calling at the hotel in London, at which I knew Mrs. Ablewhite and Miss Verinder to be staying. They informed me that they were going to Brighton the next day, and that an unexpe...
-Mathew Bruff, Solicitor, Of Gray's Inn Square. Part 4
Miss Verinder listened attentively till I had done. She then thanked me very prettily for my advice, but informed me at the same time that it was impossible for her to follow it. May I ask, I said,...
-Second Narrative. Chapter II
The next thing I have to do, is to present such additional information as I possess on the subject of the Moonstone, or, to speak more correctly, on the subject of the Indian plot to steal the Diamond...
-Second Narrative. Chapter III
The prominent personage among the guests at the dinner party I found to be Mr. Murthwaite. On his appearance in England, after his wanderings, society had been greatly interested in the traveller, as...
-Second Narrative. Chapter III. Part 2
I understood the allusion to my experience. The first chance they got, I replied, was clearly offered to them by Colonel Herncastle's death. They would be aware of his death, I suppose, as a matte...
-Second Narrative. Chapter III. Part 3
It was impossible to deny that he had met my difficulty fairly; thanks to his superior knowledge of the Indian character - and thanks to his not having had hundreds of other Wills to think of since Co...
-Third Narrative. Contributed By Franklin Blake. Chapter I
In the spring of the year eighteen hundred and forty-nine I was wandering in the East, and had then recently altered the travelling plans which I had laid out some months before, and which I had commu...
-Third Narrative. Chapter II
Betteredge! I said, pointing to the well-remembered book on his knee, has ROBINSON CRUSOE informed you, this evening, that you might expect to see Franklin Blake? By the lord Harry, Mr. Franklin...
-Third Narrative. Chapter II. Continued
I remembered the place the moment Betteredge mentioned it. The farm-house stood in a sheltered inland valley, on the banks of the prettiest stream in that part of Yorkshire: and the farmer had a spare...
-Third Narrative. Chapter III
I have only the most indistinct recollection of what happened at Hotherstone's Farm. I remember a hearty welcome; a prodigious supper, which would have fed a whole village in the East; a delightfully...
-Third Narrative. Chapter III. Part 2
Sir, - If you are curious to know the meaning of my behaviour to you, whilst you were staying in the house of my mistress, Lady Verinder, do what you are told to do in the memorandum enclosed with th...
-Third Narrative. Chapter III. Part 3
My directions in the memorandum instructed me to feel along the line traced by the stick, beginning with the end which was nearest to the beacon. I advanced, in this manner, more than half way along ...
-Third Narrative. Chapter IV
I have not a word to say about my own sensations. My impression is that the shock inflicted on me completely suspended my thinking and feeling power. I certainly could not have known what I was about...
-Third Narrative. Chapter IV. Part 2
Besides, you will find your nightgown in my hiding-place, with the smear of the paint on it; and you will want to know how it came to be hidden by me? and why I said nothing to you about it in my lif...
-Third Narrative. Chapter IV. Part 3
Mr. Seegrave began, as you may remember, by setting a guard on the women's bedrooms; and the women all followed him up-stairs in a rage, to know what he meant by the insult he had put on them. I went...
-Third Narrative. Chapter IV. Part 4
I was afraid to put it off till next day (the Friday); being in doubt lest some accident might happen in the interval. I determined to make the new nightgown on that same day (the Thursday), while I ...
-Third Narrative. Chapter IV. Part 5
What I was about, while the household believed me to be lying down in my own room; and how I spent the night, after shamming ill again at tea-time, and having been sent up to bed, there is no need to...
-Third Narrative. Chapter V
Having told me the name of Mr. Candy's assistant, Betteredge appeared to think that we had wasted enough of our time on an insignificant subject. He resumed the perusal of Rosanna Spearman's letter. ...
-Third Narrative. Chapter V. Part 2
Where is the use of my dwelling in this way on my own folly? The plain truth is plain enough, surely? Behind your back, I loved you with all my heart and soul. Before your face - there's no denying i...
-Third Narrative. Chapter V. Part 3
I determined to hide it; and the place I fixed on was the place I knew best - the Shivering Sand. As soon as the questioning was over, I made the first excuse that came into my head, and got leave ...
-Third Narrative. Chapter VI
I walked to the railway station accompanied, it is needless to say, by Gabriel Betteredge. I had the letter in my pocket, and the nightgown safely packed in a little bag - both to be submitted, before...
-Third Narrative. Chapter VI. Part 2
The reading completed, Mr. Bruff addressed me for the first time since we had been shut up together in the seclusion of his own room. Franklin Blake, said the old gentleman, this is a very serious...
-Third Narrative. Chapter VI. Part 3
It would have its effect on her mind, he said gravely. And I wish, for your sake, the thing had not happened. However, we have discovered that there WAS a predisposing influence against you - and t...
-Third Narrative. Chapter VII
At the moment when I showed myself in the doorway, Rachel rose from the piano. I closed the door behind me. We confronted each other in silence, with the full length of the room between us. The movem...
-Third Narrative. Chapter VII. Part 2
Suspect you! she exclaimed, her anger rising with mine. YOU VILLAIN, I SAW YOU TAKE THE DIAMOND WITH MY OWN EYES! The revelation which burst upon me in those words, the overthrow which they insta...
-Third Narrative. Chapter VII. Part 3
After blowing out the candle, did you go back to bed? I had no time to go back. At the moment when I blew the candle out, the sitting-room door opened, and I saw - - You saw? You. Dresse...
-Third Narrative. Chapter VII. Part 4
I took up my hat. In mercy to HER - yes! I can honestly say it - in mercy to HER, I turned away without a word, and opened the door by which I had entered the room. She followed, and snatched the doo...
-Third Narrative. Chapter VIII
Late that evening, I was surprised at my lodgings by a visit from Mr. Bruff. There was a noticeable change in the lawyer's manner. It had lost its usual confidence and spirit. He shook hands with me,...
-Third Narrative. Chapter VIII. Part 2
Well, well, I understand that. Have you thought yet of what you can do? I have thought of consulting Sergeant Cuff. He has retired from the police. It's useless to expect the Sergeant to help y...
-Third Narrative. Chapter VIII. Part 3
Devoting myself once more to the elucidation of the impenetrable puzzle which my own position presented to me, I now tried to meet the difficulty by investigating it from a plainly practical point of ...
-Third Narrative. Chapter VIII. Part 4
I went, then and there, to pay my visit. The same fatality which had made me just one day too late in calling on Sergeant Cuff, made me again one day too late in calling on Godfrey. He had left Londo...
-Third Narrative. Chapter VIII. Part 5
That's it! cried Mr. Candy. The birthday dinner! He started impulsively to his feet, and looked at me. A deep flush suddenly overspread his faded face, and he abruptly sat down again, as if consci...
-Third Narrative. Chapter IX
The doctor's pretty housemaid stood waiting for me, with the street door open in her hand. Pouring brightly into the hall, the morning light fell full on the face of Mr. Candy's assistant when I turne...
-Third Narrative. Chapter IX. Part 2
Pray go on! You have interested me already in hearing the details. My eagerness seemed to amuse - perhaps, I might rather say, to please him. He smiled again. We had by this time left the last hous...
-Third Narrative. Chapter IX. Part 3
He made that bitterly professional apology for his tears, speaking quietly and unaffectedly, as he had spoken throughout. His tone and manner, from beginning to end, showed him to be especially, almos...
-Third Narrative. Chapter IX. Part 4
To have answered him with the frankness which his language and his manner both claimed from me, would have been to commit myself to openly acknowledging that I was suspected of the theft of the Diamon...
-Third Narrative. Chapter IX. Part 5
Mr. Blake! he said, suddenly. You are in bad company. The cloud of a horrible accusation has rested on me for years. I tell you the worst at once. I am a man whose life is a wreck, and whose charac...
-Third Narrative. Chapter X
How the interval of suspense in which I was now condemned might have affected other men in my position, I cannot pretend to say. The influence of the two hours' probation upon my temperament was simpl...
-Third Narrative. Chapter X. Part 2
There is one thing more, said Ezra Jennings, which it is very important I should know. Had you any reason for feeling any special anxiety about the Diamond, at this time last year? I had the str...
-Third Narrative. Chapter X. Part 3
Admiration of the ingenuity which had woven this smooth and finished texture out of the ravelled skein was naturally the first impression that I felt, on handing the manuscript back to Ezra Jennings. ...
-Third Narrative. Chapter X. Part 4
Dr. Abel informed me, says Mr. Combe, of an Irish porter to a warehouse, who forgot, when sober, what he had done when drunk; but, being drunk, again recollected the transactions of his former stat...
-Third Narrative. Chapter X. Part 5
Yes? and what then? It is possible, Mr. Blake - I dare not say more - that your idea of preserving the Diamond led, by a natural sequence, to the idea of hiding the Diamond, and that the place in ...
-Fourth Narrative
Extracted from the Journal of EZRA JENNINGS 1849. - June 15.... With some interruption from patients, and some interruption from pain, I finished my letter to Miss Verinder in time for to-day's post....
-Fourth Narrative. Part 2
So far, it is easy to comply with her wishes. But the second request embarrasses me seriously. Not content with having written to Mr. Betteredge, instructing him to carry out whatever directions I ma...
-Fourth Narrative. Part 3
My next inquiry related to the subject of the Diamond. Had the lawyer produced any evidence to prove that the jewel was in London? No, the lawyer had simply declined to discuss the question. He was h...
-Fourth Narrative. Part 4
I wish to know, he began, whether I may, or may not, wash my hands - - You may decidedly, said Mr. Blake. I'll ring for the waiter. - - of certain responsibilities, pursued Betteredge, i...
-Fourth Narrative. Part 5
After reading the letter, I had no hesitation in advising Mr. Blake to inform Sergeant Cuff, in reply, of all that had happened since the inquiry was suspended last year, and to leave him to draw his ...
-Fourth Narrative. Part 6
June 21st. - A short entry must suffice in my journal to-day. Mr. Blake has had the worst night that he has passed yet. I have been obliged, greatly against my will, to prescribe for him. Men of his ...
-Fourth Narrative. Part 7
Nothing has been heard of Sergeant Cuff. He is no doubt still in Ireland. We must not expect to see him to-night. Betteredge has just come in, to say that Mr. Blake has asked for me. I must lay down ...
-Fourth Narrative. Part 8
She looked at my ugly wrinkled face, with a bright gratitude so new to me in my experience of my fellow-creatures, that I was at a loss how to answer her. Nothing had prepared me for her kindness and ...
-Fourth Narrative. Part 9
I thought of Mrs. Merridew and her embroidery, and of Betteredge and his conscience. There is a wonderful sameness in the solid side of the English character - just as there is a wonderful sameness in...
-Fourth Narrative. Part 10
Are you sure you can control yourself, Miss Verinder? In HIS interests, I can do anything! she answered fervently. One look at her face told me that I could trust her. I addressed myself again t...
-Fourth Narrative. Part 11
I looked at my watch. It wanted five minutes to twelve, when the premonitory symptoms of the working of the laudanum first showed themselves to me. At this time, no unpractised eyes would have detect...
-Fourth Narrative. Part 12
It was now ten minutes past one. I heard, through the dead silence, the soft drip of the rain and the tremulous passage of the night air through the trees. After waiting irresolute, for a minute or m...
-Fourth Narrative. Part 13
I owe you this, he said, signing the paper, as some atonement for what passed between us earlier in the evening. I beg your pardon, Mr. Jennings, for having doubted you. You have done Franklin Blak...
-Fifth Narrative. The Story Resumed By Franklin Blake. Chapter I
But few words are needed, on my part, to complete the narrative that has been presented in the Journal of Ezra Jennings. Of myself, I have only to say that I awoke on the morning of the twenty-sixth,...
-The Story Resumed By Franklin Blake. Part 2
Two men among the crowd approached Mr. Bruff, as soon as he showed himself. Well, asked the lawyer. Have you seen him? He passed us here half an hour since, sir, and went on into the inner offi...
-The Story Resumed By Franklin Blake. Part 3
Not he, said Mr. Bruff. He would never have dismissed his two policemen, if he had run the risk of keeping the Diamond in his own house again. We waited another half-hour for the boy, and waited ...
-The Story Resumed By Franklin Blake. Part 4
It was close on ten o'clock, and the boy had not made his appearance. Sergeant Cuff talked of other matters. He asked after his old friend Betteredge, and his old enemy the gardener. In a minute more,...
-The Story Resumed By Franklin Blake. Part 5
It was plain, by this time, that Mr. Bruff and I had made another mistake. The sailor with the black beard was clearly not a spy in the service of the Indian conspiracy. Was he, by any possibility, th...
-The Story Resumed By Franklin Blake. Part 6
In a quarter of an hour more, the cab stopped in Shore Lane, and Gooseberry opened the door for us to get out. All right? asked the Sergeant. All right, answered the boy. The moment we entered ...
-Sixth Narrative. Contributed By Sergeant Cuff. I
Dorking, Surrey, July 30th, 1849. To Franklin Blake, Esq. Sir, - I beg to apologise for the delay that has occurred in the production of the Report, with which I engaged to furnish you. I have waited ...
-II. As To Your Cousin's Death, Then, First
It appears to be established, beyond any reasonable doubt, that he was killed (while he was asleep, or immediately on his waking) by being smothered with a pillow from his bed - that the persons guilt...
-III
With regard to the subject now in hand, I may state, at the outset, that Mr. Godfrey Ablewhite's life had two sides to it. The side turned up to the public view, presented the spectacle of a gentlema...
-IV
Late on the evening of Friday, the twenty-third of June ('forty-eight), Mr. Luker was surprised by a visit from Mr. Godfrey Ablewhite. He was more than surprised, when Mr. Godfrey produced the Moonsto...
-V
This was the story told by your cousin (under pressure of necessity) to Mr. Luker. Mr. Luker believed the story to be, as to all main essentials, true - on this ground, that Mr. Godfrey Ablewhite was...
-Seventh Narrative. In A Letter From Mr. Candy
Frizinghall, Wednesday, September 26th, 1849. - Dear Mr. Franklin Blake, you will anticipate the sad news I have to tell you, on finding your letter to Ezra Jennings returned to you, unopened, in this...
-Eighth Narrative. Contributed By Gabriel Betteredge
I am the person (as you remember no doubt) who led the way in these pages, and opened the story. I am also the person who is left behind, as it were, to close the story up. Let nobody suppose that I ...
-Epilogue. The Finding Of The Diamond. I. The Statement Of Sergeant Cliff's Man (1849)
On the twenty-seventh of June last, I received instructions from Sergeant Cuff to follow three men; suspected of murder, and described as Indians. They had been seen on the Tower Wharf that morning, e...
-II. The Statement Of The Captain (1849)
I am requested by Sergeant Cuff to set in writing certain facts, concerning three men (believed to be Hindoos) who were passengers, last summer, in the ship BEWLEY CASTLE, bound for Bombay direct, und...
-III. The Statement Of Mr. Murthwaite (1850)
(In a letter to MR. BRUFF) Have you any recollection, my dear sir, of a semi-savage person whom you met out at dinner, in London, in the autumn of 'forty-eight? Permit me to remind you that the perso...









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