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London, England | John Stoddard's Lectures



London and England. Illustrated and embellished with views of the world's famous places and people, being the identical discourses delivered during the past eighteen years under the title of the Stoddard lectures.

TitleEngland - John L. Stoddard's Lectures
AuthorJohn L. Stoddard
PublisherNorwood Press
Year1901
Copyright1901, John L. Stoddard
AmazonJohn L. Stoddard's Lectures 13 Volume Set
-England
The greatest benefit to be derived from traveling through this world of ours comes from the proofs of human thought discoverable in the memorials of great achievements. Why does the Rhine appeal to ...
-England. Part 2
Who can forget his first glimpse of Old England after an ocean voyage? No matter how many times we have beheld it, it always fills us with surprise, rising so boldly out of the apparently unlimited ex...
-England. Part 3
The Custom House Pier, Liverpool. Finally, emerging from this ordeal, we seat ourselves in a curious equipage, which bears the name of four-wheeler. Have any new four-wheelers been manufactured d...
-England. Part 4
An English locomotive looks decidedly unfinished; for, instead of our wedge-shaped cow-catcher, we see in front of it merely iron buffers (such as, also, exist at the end of every car), to lessen by h...
-England. Part 5
A Part Of The Old Wall, Chester. King Charles Tower. Old Chester Houses. Watergate Row, Chester. I never saw more curious architecture, even in the oldest towns of Germany, than that of so...
-England. Part 6
Sometimes, in looking from the window of his railway car-riage, the tourist sees the fluted towers of an old cathedral, as stately and imposing as the battlements of a Norman castle. England is proud ...
-England. Part 7
What can be prettier and more picturesque than one of the quaint old English inns, which Dickens and a score of other writers have described? Some years ago these little hostelries maintained themselv...
-England. Part 8
Gray's Garden And House. Gray wrote very carefully and slowly. I once supposed that he composed the Elegy in one brief hour of special inspiration in the churchyard; but in reality he labored sev...
-England. Part 9
The Cedars Of Mt. Lebanon, Warwick Castle. The Sun-Dial Tower, And The Courtyard. The grand reception-hall of Warwick Castle must have been a magnificent assembling place for kings and warriors ...
-England. Part 10
Kenilworth in its prime was far superior to Warwick. Its outer wall enclosed a space of seven acres; ten thousand soldiers were required to guard it; and Elizabeth's fascinating suitor, Leicester, to ...
-England. Part 11
Washington Irving's Room. The Red Horse Hotel. Shakespeare's house. The room in which the dramatist was born is low and ugly in appearance, yet what apartment in the most magnificent palace ...
-England. Part 12
Leaving at last this interesting cottage, I made my way to the beautiful old church of Stratford, which, standing in the shade of ancient elms, and with the silvery Avon slipping by its walls, is almo...
-England. Part 13
The Shakespeare Memorial. The Shakespeare Library. The Childs Fountain. Leaving this bond of union between England and America, I strolled beside the river Avon, which, like a silver ribbon, ...
-England. Part 14
Dorothy Vernon's Steps. Haddon Hall. In listening to this story, I could but think how Love will find the way in every age and land. He is a wonderful god; his kingdom reaches to the farthest ...
-England. Part 15
ST. Edmund's Hall. Oxford. Balliol College, Oxford. Trinity College Library. In a similar way the various colleges at Cambridge number among their children Jeremy Taylor, Sir Isaac Newton, Ed...
-England. Part 16
The Lime Walk, Oxford. Trinity College Avenue, Cambridge. Queen's College Library, Oxford. There are gains for all our losses, There are balms for all our pain, But when youth, the dream, de...
-England. Part 17
Byron In Youth. One of the many examples of the poet's eccentricity is the elaborate marble monument, which he caused to be erected in the park of Newstead Abbey, over the grave of a favorite Newfo...
-England. Part 18
Byron's Grave. An English Mill. In 1852, Ada, the only child of Lord and Lady Byron, whom he had never seen except in infancy, yet to whom he addressed some of his sweetest lines, was, at her ow...
-England. Part 19
Rochester Cathedral. Rochester Castle. The Bull Hotel. The Elevated Den. Gad's Hill, From The Lawn. Old Houses In Rochester. At Christmas and New Year's, Gad's Hill was always full t...
-England. Part 20
Then, in his case, were verified the words which he himself had written of little Paul Dombey, when the fair river of his childish life had mingled with the boundless sea: The golden ripple came agai...
-London
The sailor on our inland seas - Superior, Michigan, and Huron - is probably as brave and hardy as the ocean mariner. He has met tempests quite as fierce as any known to the Atlantic, and his instinc...
-London. Part 2
Whitehall. The New Law Courts. Samuel Johnson once declared, The full tide of existence is at Charing Cross, and the statement seems justified when we enter the railway station of that name, w...
-London. Part 3
A Portion Of The Strand. On my first visit to London, one of its most interesting objects was a grimy gateway, known as Temple Bar, which had for centuries marked the terminus of the Strand and the...
-London. Part 4
The Strand, Looking West. Lincoln's Inn. In King Street, Westminster, we tread a Via Dolorosa where Edmund Spenser, the poet laureate of chivalry and fairy-land, died of starva-t i o n and a bro...
-London. Part 5
In The City. Those who are nervous when driving in a cab through crowds, should mount the London omnibuses, which always carry fully as many passengers without as within; for there, serene in their...
-London. Part 6
Of all the bridges that cross the Thames, none is so famous as that which bears the appropriate name of London. Moreover, until the recent construction of the new Tower Bridge, it had the distinction ...
-London. Part 7
The Inner Temple. The Middle Temple. The Tower, From The River. The White Tower. The Bell Tower. It is as strong to-day as when its Norman architect pronounced it finished; and we may w...
-London. Part 8
Sir Waiter Rai.Eigh's Cell. The Traitor's Gate. One of the most interesting features of the Tower is the Traitor's Gate, the former entrance from the river. The Thames once laved the steps which...
-London. Part 9
Queen Elizabeth's Armory. The Horse Armory. The Crown Jewels. The Warden On Night Watch. Ornamental Trophies. Seven Dials, ST. Giles. Into the East End of London, beyond the Tower,...
-London. Part 10
Among The Poor. The Thames, And Tower Of London. The Victoria Embankment. The Thames, Below London Bridge. O silent, stately, and historic river, what suffering and sin hast thou not witne...
-London. Part 11
Nearing The Sea. The Bank Of England. Ludgate Circus. Statue Of General Gordon, Trafalgar Square. Lambeth Palace. Hotel Metropole. If the Place de la Concorde may be called the nucle...
-London. Part 12
The Imperial Institute, South Kensington. ST. Paul's Cathedral. The Entrance To St. Fail's. On every height there lies repose. Another singular fact in the history of this church is that t...
-London. Part 13
Hyde Park. Rotten Row. None of these writers, however, is so closely identified with this city by the Thames as Dickens, who found its streets at once his workshop, and the principal source of h...
-London. Part 14
The Old Curiosity Shop. A Part Of The Marshalsea Prison. Lodge In ST. James' Park. A still more pathetic memorial of Bleak House is the pauper's burial-ground, whither Jo conducted Lady D...
-London. Part 15
America. Asia. Africa. The best view of England's Houses of Parliament is obtained from the river along which they extend for nearly one thousand feet. Built in elaborate Gothic style, their ...
-London. Part 16
The Throne. The House Of Commons. John Bright. The face of Gladstone beamed with animation, sparkled with intelligence, glowed with fervor, and merited what Justin McCarthy said of it, that i...
-London. Part 17
The Princes Chamber. The Foreign Office. Hampden. Burke. Prince Of Wales. For more than five hundred years a constant struggle has been going on in the Anglo-Saxon race between the idea...
-London. Part 18
The Choir. Tomb Of Henry III. Tomb Of Edward III. The Tomb Of Queen Elizabeth. Surrounded by these royal tombs, stands one of the most interesting relics of antiquity to be found in any la...
-London. Part 19
The Tomb Of Dean Stanley. The Avenue Of Statesmen. Lord Palmerston. Nor are the forms of heroes and philanthropists wanting here. We look, for example, on memorials of Colin Campbell, who rec...
-London. Part 20
There is not a theme in history, poetry, science, romance, or philosophy that it has not touched upon, illumined, and embellished. Next to the literature of Greece, it is at once the most voluminous a...









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