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British Dogs: Their Varieties, History, Characteristics, Breeding, Management, And Exhibition | by Hugh Dalziel



Few subjects, and certainly no animal, has been treated with so much written eloquence as the Dog, nor do we grudge the lavish encomiums heaped upon him, for they are well deserved. That we do not follow in the usual course pursued by writers on this subject there are several reasons. First, the felt want of ability to give expression to our views and feelings in language at once sufficiently laudatory and appropriate; secondly, that the several writers who have assisted in compiling this book may be trusted to do justice to the breeds they treat of in better terms than we can; and, lastly, that as the book is intended to be in great part descriptive of the varieties as seen and classified at our dog shows, and therefore a practical work, both for the experienced exhibitor and the tyro whose love for the dog needs no stimulus, panegyrics on his good qualities are not needed...

TitleBritish Dogs: Their Varieties, History, Characteristics, Breeding, Management, And Exhibition
AuthorHugh Dalziel
Publisher"The Bazaar" Office, London
Year1897
Copyright1897, "The Bazaar" Office
AmazonBritish Dogs

Illustrated With Portraits of Dogs of the Day.

By Hugh Dalziel ("Corsincon"), Author of "The Diseases of Dogs," "The Diseases of Horses" etc.+

Assisted By Eminent Fanciers.

-Preface
When reminded by the Publisher that a dozen or so lines of Preface were needful in introducing British Dogs to the public, the following questions were forcibly presented to my mind: First, whether...
-Introductory
Few subjects, and certainly no animal, has been treated with so much written eloquence as the Dog, nor do we grudge the lavish encomiums heaped upon him, for they are well deserved. That we do not fo...
-Introductory. Continued
It may be said that with works to hand, wherein the subject is so well and exhaustively treated as those of Stonehenge, Youatt, Hamilton, etc, there is no necessity for further writing on the subjec...
-Division I. Dogs Used In Field Sports. Group I. Dogs That Hunt Their Game By Sight, And Kill
Including: 1. Greyhound. 2. Deerhound. 3. Irish Wolfhound. 4. Rough Scotch Greyhound. 5. Lurcher. 6. Whippet or Snap Dog. 7. Siberian Wolfhound. 8. Persian Greyhound. The whole of this group i...
-Chapter I. The Greyhound
The particular variety of Canes venatici grayii of which I propose to treat, and which possesses an inherent right to occupy the highest place in the group of dogs hunting by keenness of sight and fle...
-The Greyhound. Part 2
This being so, in estimating the greyhound's claim to be the handsomest of the canine race, we must remember for what his various excellences, resulting in a whole which is so strikingly elegant, is d...
-The Greyhound. Part 3
It is, therefore, important that the conformation of the dog should be such as to combine speed with a strength and suppleness that will, as far as possible, enable him to control and guide the veloci...
-The Greyhound. Part 4
The general form and character of the head is here pretty fairly sketched, and we see a very close agreement between these old authorities. It appears to me that the Mayster of Game was the most hap...
-The Greyhound. Part 5
Continuing from the neck we have the broad, square, beam-like back of good length and great strength; without this the dog could not endure the exhaustive process of the pumpers he is submitted to. ...
-Chapter II. The Scotch Deerhound
This article has been specially contributed to this volume by a gentleman who has chosen to veil his identity under the worn de plume of Senex. He is a popular judge, and one whose extended experien...
-Chapter III. The Irish Wolfhound
To do full justice to this subject is almost impossible, owing to the fact that there has been a generally received impression amongst modern writers that this noble breed of dog is entirely extinct! ...
-The Irish Wolfhound. Part 2
It is perfectly certain, from these and many other accounts, allusion to which want of space renders impossible, that the dog was of vast size and strength, and all agree in stating that, whilst his p...
-The Irish Wolfhound. Part 3
As the rough Scotch greyhound is to the present deerhound, so is the deerhound to what the Irish wolfhound was! It may be of interest to mention here that the last wolf is said to have been killed in...
-The Irish Wolfhound. Part 4
Richardson, in his essay on this breed, says Sir Richard Betham, Ulster King at Arms, has stated it as his conviction that the Irish wolf dog was a gigantic greyhound, not smooth-skinned, like our gr...
-Chapter IV. The Scotch Rough-Haired Greyhound
This variety of dog is now rarely met with except on some show benches, mixing with his larger brethren the deerhounds, and assuming their name. The popularity and great increase of public coursing se...
-Chapter V. The Lurcher
It would be in vain to look for the lurcher in the streets or parks of London, in any of our considerable towns, or at any of our dog shows. In some of our manufacturing towns he is kept, but out of s...
-Chapter VI. The Whippet
The whippet, or snap dog, as he is also called, is a great favourite with workmen in Durham and other northern counties, and the Darlington Show never fails to bring together a large collection of the...
-Chapter VII. The Siberian Wolfhound
This is a dog of the Scotch deerhound type, and much the same in size. The most striking difference is in the colour. The grizzle, almost universal in the deerhound, gives place here to a mixture of c...
-Chapter VIII. The Persian Greyhound
The specimens of this graceful but rather delicate variety are comparatively rare in England, still we generally have one or more at our London shows. They are of similar type to our greyhound but bu...
-Group II. Dogs That Hunt Their Game By Scent, And Kill
Including: 1. The Bloodhound. 2. The Foxhound, 3. The Otterhound. 4. The Harrier. 5. The Beagle. 6. The Bassett. 7. The Dachshund This group corresponds in head formation with the second division...
-Chapter IX. The Bloodhound
He who attempts to discover the origin and trace the history of anyone of our breeds of dogs, beyond a comparativly few generations, will, in most or all cases, speedily find himself in a fog, tossed ...
-The Bloodhound. Part 2
About the groud they set on breid and length A hundreth men, chairgit in arms Strang, To keep a hunde that they had them amang, In Gillisland there was that Brachall bred, Sikyr of seen,, to follow th...
-The Bloodhound. Part 3
Moreover, although they should pass over the water, thinking thereby to avoid the pursuit of the hounds, yet will not these dogs give over their attempt, but, presuming to swim through the stream, pe...
-The Bloodhound. Part 4
The barrel of moderate length, ribs deep and well sprung; loins and hind quarters very muscular; the tail of great length, set on high, thick at the base, and tapering, but not to a fine point - very ...
-Chapter X. The Foxhound
The writer of the following spirited article, has been a frequent contributor to The Country, and well known as a judge at many of our most important shows, and that he is equally at home and happy in...
-The Foxhound. Part 2
I do not rhyme for that dull elf Who cannot picture to himself that the chief reason why our ' flower of chivalry' are the finest and best field officers in the world is owing to the knowledge of the ...
-The Foxhound. Part 3
When the leading hounds once went headlong after their fox over the Speeton Cliff he begged a farmer to fetch a cart rope and lower him over the precipice, and he was drawn up first with Lavender in h...
-Chapter XI. The Otter-Hound
Although many writers describe the Otter-hound as a dog of mixed breed, all refer him back to the old southern hound, or the bloodhound, for his origin, whatever crosses may have been resorted to to p...
-Chapter XII. The Harrier
Of the various breeds of hounds, none has undergone greater modifications than the Harrier or hare-hound, so called from his having been kept exclusively, or nearly so, to the pursuit of that game. C...
-Chapter XIII. The Beagle
This is another and the smallest of hounds or hunting dogs, as the name Beagle, which means smallness, implies. The following description from Somerville's poem, The Chase, applies with propriety ...
-Chapter XIV. The Basset
The following article is from the pen of Snapshot (a frequent contributor, under that signature, to The Country, and also well known as Wildfowler of the Field ), who is the author of numerous c...
-The Basset. Part 2
He is, therefore, not so often used there as for smaller coverts, where his voice can throughout the hunt be heard, and thereby direct the shooters which post of vantage to take. As regards the coat...
-The Basset. Part 3
The crooked-legged ones go slow and sure, the straight-legged ones run into the defect of fast hounds, i.e., they go too fast occasionally for their noses; they are not either quite so free from riot;...
-Chapter XV. The Dachshund
To Vert as a sportsman we have already alluded in the preface to his article on Foxhounds, and we need only say here that his large experience of Dachshunds entitles his opinions on the breed to be ...
-The Dachshund. Part 2
We are frequently told so-and-so's terrier has finished his badger in some very small numbers of minutes. But there are badgers and badgers - baby badgers; and if we are to believe a tithe of what we ...
-The Dachshund. Part 3
11. Feet. - The feet of the fore legs are more muscular than those of the hind legs, the toes well closed, with nails strongly curved and black; the sole of the feet is broad and thick. The toes of th...
-Chapter XVI. The Schweisshund
This is a German hound which will, when better known in England, find a place in our shows. They are about the size of our larger foxhounds. I had the opportunity of seeing a large class of them at th...
-Group III. Dogs That Find Their Game By Scent, And Index It For The Advantage Of The Gun
Including: 1. The English Setter. 2. The Irish Setter, 3. The Gordon or Black and Tan Setter. 4. The Spanish Pointer. 5. The Pointer. 6. The Dropper. This group corresponds sufficiently closely w...
-Chapter XVII. The English Setter
Difficult as it admittedly is to trace the history of any of our modern breeds of dogs, although, in most instances, their manufacture, if I may use the term, into their present form is of comparative...
-The English Setter. Continued
We find absolute purity of Laverack blood in Mr. T. B. Bower's Bandit, Mr. George Lowe's Tarn O'Shanter, in Mr. A. P. Heywood-Lonsdale's kennels, and a few others, but good and handsome setters only p...
-Chapter XVIII. The Irish Setter
A Veteran Sportsman, author of A Correct Delineation of the Canine Race, writing in 1803, says: The sporting gentlemen of Ireland are more partial to setters than pointers, and probably they are ...
-Chapter XIX. The Gordon Or Black And Tan Setter
Whether the dog under consideration should be called the black and tan setter or the Gordon setter is a subject open to controversy, but of one thing there is no doubt, as the authentic records of bre...
-Chapter XX. The Spanish Pointer
The old heavy lumbering Spanish pointer is said to be no more, at least, in this country; but, judging from specimens we still see occasionally at shows, he has not been entirely improved out of exist...
-Chapter XXL. The Pointer
The pointer is now, and has ever been, most essentially a sporting dog. Although his origin is not quite clear, nor the country from which he was imported into England satisfactorily made out, still h...
-The Pointer. Part 2
There is no doubt whatever that the modern pointer, owing to his increased pace, and through being able to endure (by his better formation) more hard work with less fatigue, is of more service to the ...
-The Pointer. Part 3
Now, even in Scotland, setting dogs are, after the first three weeks, of little service; so that for partridge shooting (where it is not conducted in gangs) I consider that the pointer has still, th...
-The Pointer. Part 4
The feet should be of proportionate size to the dog, and either round or cat-shaped, or pointed like that of the hare. I have seen dogs with both kinds stand any amount of work without going lame, the...
-The Pointer. Part 5
Many otherwise good dogs turn out useless because of their defective temper, and, therefore, I think it is an all-important matter to get a good-tempered dog, especially if he is to be trained for spo...
-The Pointer. Part 6
Special is a dog of great muscular development. He has only been exhibited seventeen times, and has won sixteen prizes. His pedigree is of the best, combining as it does the blood of the most noted fi...
-Chapter XXII. The Dropper
The cross between the setter and the pointer is so called, and often proves to be a hardy, useful dog, displaying the excellencies of both parents; but, although individual specimens turn out all that...
-Group IV. Dogs Used With The Gun In Questing And Retrieving Game
Including: 1. The Black Spaniel. 2. The Cocker. 3. The Clumber Spaniel. 4. The Sussex Spaniel. 5. The Norfolk Spaniel. 6. The Irish Water Spaniel. 7. English Water Spaniel. 8. The Flat or Wavyc...
-Chapter XXIII. Spaniels
The spaniels, as we now understand the term, are a numerous family, which has by modern breeding become split up into many divisions, most of them pretty clearly defined, but, in some instances, more ...
-Chapter XXIV. The Black Spaniel
These dogs have achieved great prominence since the establishment of dog shows, the principal breeders and exhibitors of them having been the late Mr. Burdett, of Birmingham; the late Mr. Jones, of Os...
-Chapter XXV. The Cocker Spaniel
Small sized spaniels, weighing from 201b. or even less to 241b., and of all colours - liver, black, white with liver or black, and in these flecked or mottled on face, legs, etc. - are still pretty nu...
-Chapter XXVI. The Clumber Spaniel
The Clumber is unquestionably the aristocrat of the spaniel family, in comparison to whom his modern black brother of the benches is a mere parvenu, and the Irish water spaniel as an unkempt kerne to ...
-Chapter XXVII. The Sussex Spaniel
In introducing Castra to our readers it will be sufficient to say he is a gentleman who has taken an enthusiastic interest in, and done much to save the true Sussex spaniel from annihilation by abs...
-Chapter XXVIII. The Norfolk Spaniel
The Norfolk belongs to the springer branch of the family, and is rather a leggy dog, of an average weight of about 401b., and generally liver and white in colour. This variety is stated to have been ...
-Chapter XXIX. The Irish Water Spaniel
To a sportsman of limited means, or one who has not accommodation to keep a team, the Irish water spaniel is the most useful dog he can have, inasmuch as he can be made to perform the duties of pointe...
-The Irish Water Spaniel. Continued
The head from the apex to the eye is large and capacious, giving the appearance of being short, which is by no means the case, only appearing so from its being so heavily furnished with topknot; the d...
-Chapter XXX. The English Water Spaniel
In the Kennel Club Stud Book will be found a list of about two dozen spaniels, classed as Water Spaniels other than Irish. I have often pondered over this, wondering what it was meant to nclude, an...
-Chapter XXXI. Retrievers
There is, perhaps, no name that is applied to dogs of so many different characters by the general public as Retriever, and if it can be correctly used to describe the amazing varieties of mongrelism s...
-Chapter XXXII. The Black Wavy-Coated Retriever
When Stonehenge published his first edition of the Dogs of the British Islands, about ten years ago, he wrote anent retrievers that they must be either black or black and tan, or black with tabby...
-Chapter XXXIII. The Black Curly-Coated Retriever
There are few handsomer dogs than a good specimen of this breed, such, for instance, as Toby, True, X L, Muswell-Butterfly, or Chicory, with their compact forms, neat clean legs, and coats of jetty bl...
-Chapter XXXIV. The Norfolk Retriever
To the preceding varieties we now add another, which Saxon, a Norfolk sportsman, claims as peculiar to his county. Of the correctness of so doing, however, we have some doubt, for although retriever...
-Chapter XXXV. Liver-Coloured Retrievers
These also are smooth, or wavy and curly-coated. Of the former I have not seen a good specimen exhibited for a considerable time, the few I have seen being coarse, and apparently half bred spaniels. S...
-Chapter XXXVI. The Russian Retriever
A few years ago the Russian retriever was often met with at our shows, and Mr. E. B. Southwell's Czar scored a good number of first prizes in the variety classes, but for two seasons past I do not rec...
-Exhibiting. The History Of Dog Shows
Dog Shows and Dog Judging, and Standard of Excellence by which to Judge. Including; 1. History of Shows. 2. Objects and Management. 3. The Judges: their Election. 4. Judging by Points. 5. Scale ...
-Chapter XXXVIII. Objects And Management Of Dog Shows
The one great object which should take precedence of all others, and the one which is universally professed, is the improvement of the various breeds. There are many other objects which naturally ass...
-Chapter XXXIX. The Judges: Their Election, Etc
In dog shows the judge is the central figure; not only does he pose) and is sometimes posed) in the middle of the ring in which the aspirants to fame are paraded, and where he and his doings are, for ...
-Chapter XL. Judging By Points
The newest and most brilliant luminary in canine literature, before whom all past and present dealers in doggy lore must, sooner or later, pale their ineffectual fires, is Mr. Vero Shaw, and he says, ...
-Chapter XLI. Standard Of Excellence
1. Greyhound Points. Head........... 10 Neck............ 10 Chest and forequarters...... 20 Loin and back ribs.......... 15 ...
-Division II. Dogs Useful To Man In Other Work Than Field Sports
Group I. Dogs Specially Used By Man As Assistants In His Work Including: 1. The Scotch Colley. 2. The Smooth - coated Colley. 3. The Bearded Colley. 4. The English Sheepdog or Drover's Dog. 5. The ...
-Chapter I. The Scotch Colley
I do not think it possible to say much - if, indeed, anything - new about the colley; but as there has been almost as much nonsense written about this dog as on the subject of teetotalism, I shall try...
-The Scotch Colley. Part 2
In the recently issued edition of his work, Stonehenge has swept his pages clean of all such trumpery, recognising that the extraordinary intelligence really possessed by the colley needs not the em...
-The Scotch Colley. Part 3
Of the moral and intellectual qualities of the dog a great deal of very silly rubbish has been written. His intelligence is of such a high order that it is not improved, but made ridiculous by the emb...
-The Scotch Colley. Part 4
The eyes are pretty close together, being set well forward and at an oblique angle, as, indeed, the eyes of all breeds are, more or less, although in most not so pronounced as in the colley. The colou...
-Chapter II. The Smooth-Coated Colley
In all points, except coat, this variety is a facsimile of the more fashionable rough-coated ones, indeed, rough-coated and smooth-coated are often found in the same litter, a good instance of which i...
-Chapter III. The Bearded Colley
In the west of Scotland there is a rough-faced and very shaggy-coated dog called the bearded colley, differing mainly from the true colley in being rough-faced, rather heavier built, altogether less e...
-Chapter IV. The English Bob-Tailed Sheepdog, Or Drover's Dog
This appears to be quite a distinct variety of pronounced type, but confusion appears to have arisen in the minds of more than one writer by taking every drover's dog with a docked tail to belong to t...
-Chapter V. The Esquimaux Dog
The Esquimaux dog occupies as wide a geographical range, and includes as much variety, as the human species to whom the term is applied, but also presents throughout its variations certain general and...
-The Esquimaux Dog. Continued
The head is wolf-like, with the same pointed muzzle, and, more or less, the oblique eye, which gives the dog a treacherous appearance; ears small, rounded, erect, and pointed forward; short thick nec...
-Chapter VI. The Truffle Dog
Considering the utility of this little dog, and that he is so inbred and distinct from other varieties, it is a wonder we never see specimens in the variety classes at our shows, for although truffle ...
-Group II. Watchers And Defenders Of Life And Property, Companion And Ornamental Dogs
Including: 1. The Bulldog. 2. The Mastiff. 3. The St. Bernard. 4. The Newfoundland. 5. The Dalmatian. 6. The Thibet Mastiff. 7. The Great Dane. 8. The German Mastiff, or Boarhound. The head for...
-Chapter VII. The Bulldog
OF the many distinct varieties of the domesticated dog, the bulldog, although one of the oldest and purest, is the most neglected and misrepresented. From being very numerous and popular, it has becom...
-The Bulldog. Part 2
This sight so pleased the said earl that he gave all those meadows (called the Castle Meadows) where first the bull duel began for a common to the butchers of the town, after the first grass was eaten...
-The Bulldog. Part 3
Bulldogs, especially th9 large and new types, are frequently seen with this defective formation, which is termed frog-faced and down-faced, and this formation should deprive the dog of all claim t...
-The Bulldog. Part 4
But if reared and trained with the same care and kindness expended on other breeds, there is, as Dr. Caius says of it, no dog that can serve the sundry uses of men so aptly or so conveniently as th...
-The Bulldog. Part 5
Well! of all dogs, it stands confessed, Your English bulldogs are the best! I say it and will set my hand to it; Cambden records it, and I'll stand to it. The outline of Rosa, in the well-known print...
-The Bulldog. Part 6
The following description of the bulldog, was, after careful consideration, adopted as the standard type of excellence for the breed by the Bulldog Club, 1875 (of which I was then Hon. Secretary) toge...
-The Bulldog. Part 7
Overleaf I give a table of the points by which bulldogs were to be judged by the Bulldog Club, and a copy of the form which should be used by the judge. SCALE OF MARKS FOR JUDGING BULLDOGS BY POINTS....
-Chapter VIII. The Mastiff
It is not my intention to write a history of the old English mastiff, or to attempt to trace his origin or prove him the indigenous dog of Britain. Such a task would require more ability and research ...
-The Mastiff. Part 2
Coming down to the time of Cains and Cotgrave, who both wrote in the reign of Elizabeth, mastiffs and bulldogs are both mentioned, but no description of any accuracy is given of either; and to constru...
-The Mastiff. Part 3
In general appearance the mastiff is noble and dignified; his strength is shown in his immense bone, large, square, and well-knit frame, whilst the majesty of his carriage, his noble head, and the mag...
-Chapter IX. The St. Bernard
Among the large-sized companion dogs of the day there can be no doubt of the St. Bernard occupying the position of chief favourite with the public at the present time. The large classes brought toge...
-The St. Bernard. Part 2
It was not until dog shows had been some years established that a class was made for St. Bernards; this was first done at the show held March, 1863, in the Ashburnham Hall, Cremorne, first and second ...
-The St. Bernard. Part 3
The second objection I have to it, and which I hope readers will not consider an irrational one, is that to my mind it is an anachronism to introduce a monkish superstition as a factor in the practica...
-The St. Bernard. Part 4
The particulars given of the Rev. J. Cumming-Macdona's grand old dog Tell - now dead many years - I have copied from Stonehenge's first edition of the Dogs of the British Islands, thinking it migh...
-Chapter X. The Newfoundland
Whenever I sit down to write about any breed of dog I feel disposed to dash off with Of all varieties of the dog none has created so much public interest, given rise to such wide and protracted discu...
-The Newfoundland. Part 2
The contention of those who say the original breed did not stand more than about 25in. at the shoulder is greatly discounted by references to the size and dignified appearance of the dog by older writ...
-The Newfoundland. Part 3
Eyes and ears. The eyes of this dog are small, and rather deeply set; but there should be no display of the haw or third eyelid. They are generally brown, of various shades, but light rather than da...
-Chapter XL. The Landseer Newfoundland
That great artist, Sir Edwin Landseer, having immortalised a black and white dog, of Newfoundland type, in his painting, A Distinguished Member of the Humane Society, made this variety too popular t...
-Chapter XII. The Dalmatian
The origin of the Dalmatian is quite as obscure as that of any other breed. When naturalists indulged in flights of fancy on such subjects this peculiarly spotted dog was said to be the offspring of a...
-The Dalmatian. Continued
Dalmatians are unusually plentiful in the charming districts surrounding the Crystal Palace, and fair puppies may often be bought very cheaply from some of the owners of public carriages, as they are ...
-Chapter XIII. The Thibet Mastiff
This breed is comparatively rare in England, and therefore only occasionally met with at our shows, but he is such a magnificent animal that I would gladly see him bred here, as he is really well wort...
-Chapter XIV. The Great Dane
The most consistent and also persistent advocate for including the great Dane among the list of British dogs is Mr. Frank Adcock, of Shevington Hall, Wigan, and his monster dog Satan and bitch Proserp...
-Chapter XV. The German Boarhound
The German boarhound is fairly entitled to a place here on the lines we have laid down, namely, to include dogs not strictly British when frequently met with at our shows, and, by the attention paid t...
-Chapter XVI. The Bulldogs Of Spain And The Continent
The dog, of which this slight sketch attempts to treat, is one for which Great Britain has been famous since the advent of the Romans, who conveyed large numbers to Italy. Sir Wm. Jardine says, it ma...
-The Bulldogs Of Spain And The Continent. Continued
A wretched jaded beast, tied to a stake, a toy bulldog, or indeed a game fox terrier, would no doubt be able to pin; but it was no such miserable exhibition as this which suggested Claudian's Magnaqu...
-Group III. Vermin Destroyers: The Terriers
Including: 1. The Fox Terrier. 2. The Wire-haired Fox Terrier, 3. The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. 4. The Bedlington Terrier. 5. The Black and Tan Terrier. 6. The Skye Terrier. 7. The Bull Terrier. ...
-Chapter XVII. The Fox Terrier
Among all those who have written on fox terriers of late years, none appear to have been inclined to go to the root of the matter and tell us anything of the origin and early history of this breed. A...
-The Fox Terrier. Part 2
From the Belvoir kennels thirty-five years ago Sir Thomas Whichcote got Old Tyrant, and he was of a sort that never has been surpassed. This breed was kept very select, and among other direct descenda...
-The Fox Terrier. Part 3
I would much sooner breed from a dog with an unauthenticated pedigree that gets good stock, and is also the grandsire of good ones, than from such animals as Diver, Draco, Brick, Bitters, or Trimmer. ...
-The Fox Terrier. Part 4
Weights And Measurements Of Fox Terriers Rev. F. De Castro's Buffer (sire of champions Buffet, Nimrod, etc.): Age, 8 years and 6 months; weight, 17˝lb.; height at shoulder, 14in.; length from nose to...
-Chapter XVIII. The Wire-Haired Fox Terrier
It is not unfrequently said and written that the fox terrier is a comparatively modern invention, and that he was compounded from various elements, such as beagle, old English terrier, bulldog, etc, a...
-The Wire-Haired Fox Terrier. Continued
On this point Stonehenge says: The Fox Terrier Club description does not sufficiently, I think, insist on the thick and soft undercoat, which should always be regarded as of great importance in res...
-Chapter XIX. The Dandie Dinmont Terrier
First, touching Dandies, let us consider with some degree of scientific strictness what a Dandie specially is. The consideration of this question - of what a Dandie Dinmont terrier specially is - ha...
-The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Part 2
1800. Tuggin, from A. Armstrong, reddish and wiry. Tarr, reddish and wiry-haired, a bitch. Pepper, shaggy and light, Mr. Brown, of Bonjedward. The race of Dandies are bred from the two last. J. D....
-The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Part 3
This is a Dandie. Well might Mr. Bradshaw Smith write of this effusion, such a description of this beautiful animal is enough to mak auld Dandie Dinmont himsel loup oot o' his grave. Had Mr. Coll...
-The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Part 4
Point 5. The ears should be large and pendulous, from 3˝in. to 4in. long, set far apart, well back, and rather low on the skull, hanging close to the cheeks, like a hound's or beagle's, but a little m...
-The Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Part 5
Pedigree Of Grip Grip, sire Dirk (known as the incomparable Dirk), by Pepper: (known as the murderer ) out of Jenny, all bred by Mr. E. Bradshaw Smith, Blackwood House, Ecclefechan. Grip's dam wa...
-Chapter XX. The Bedlington Terrier
The Bedlington terrier had a hard struggle to obtain from dog show committees that recognition to which he is so well entitled. He has, however, now gained his true position among modern terriers, and...
-The Bedlington Terrier. Part 2
At Liverpool, to which show she was sent on, a similar mistake occurred; but the committee of the show becoming aware of the fact, sent Mr. Pickett a special prize. Despite this series of rebuffs, Mr....
-The Bedlington Terrier. Part 3
In respect to the character of the Bedlington, I have been converted from a prejudice against him to a very strong feeling in his favour, and that by fairly studying the breed and finding that two, th...
-Chapter XXL. The Black And Tan Terrier
As far back as the history of British dogs goes we have mention of the terrier, the dog that went to earth after fox and badger, and by conceaved fear drove them out of their hollow harbours. I hav...
-The Black And Tan Terrier. Continued
The head must be long and narrow, clean cut, tight skinned, with no bulging out at the cheeks; the skull flat and narrow. The muzzle should be long, lean, and tapering, with the teeth level, or the i...
-Chapter XXII. The Skye Terrier
For several years past this game little dog and favourite pet has been much discussed in newspapers dealing with canine subjects. I am anxious that the views of each party should be fairly represented...
-The Skye Terrier. Part 2
The same authority adds that Skye terriers have for many years been bred, both north and south, for the drawing room rather than the otter's 'holt' and the badger's 'earth,' but this, if true at all, ...
-The Skye Terrier. Part 3
Tail. Short, and rather bushy, about 9in. long (hair inclusive), and the nearer straight in carriage the better it looks. A long ' whiphandle ' style of tail does not belong to the breed. Height. F...
-The Skye Terrier. Part 4
The Mogstads, Drynocks, and Camusennaries, referred to by Mr. Murray as breeds, would be more accurately described as strains exhibiting those slight differences from others from the same pa...
-The Skye Terrier. Part 5
The Mogstad Skyes were of a dark greyish colour, with wiry hair, from 3in. to 3˝in. long, with body low but long, and measuring well in girth, legs stout and short, and well provided with very strong...
-The Skye Terrier. Part 6
Length from shoulder to root of tail, from 13in. to 17in.; girth round chest, from 15in. to 16˝in.; tail, about 6in. or 7in. long, slightly curved; height will vary from 7˝in. to 9˝in. Legs should be ...
-The Skye Terrier. Part 7
Mr. John Flinn says: Early writers on natural history have not left sufficient material to enable us to arrive at the origin of the different breeds of terriers native to this country, consequently,...
-The Skye Terrier. Part 8
The researches of naturalists prove that the covering of animals adapts itself to the climate in which they are placed. Many examples might be given to show that the coat Nature provides to quadruped...
-The Skye Terrier. Part 9
Again, if there is burrowing to do, the short-legged one has also the advantage of the other, as it is impossible to use long legs properly in a hole. The shortest-legged of all burrowing animals is t...
-Chapter XXIII. The Bull Terrier
The bull terrier is understood to be the produce of a cross between the bulldog and the terrier, but it is generally admitted that there are other elements in the bull terrier of the present day. What...
-Chapter XXIV. The Scotch Terrier
Scotland is prolific in terriers, and for the most part these are long-backed and short-legged dogs. Such is the Dandie Dinmont, the Skye, and the Aberdeen terrier; but the old hard and shorthaired t...
-Chapter XXV. The Irish Terrier
The enthusiasm characteristic of Irishmen has, within the last few years, brought this terrier to the front with a dash. Lovers of the breed, those who best knew its inherent good and useful qualitie...
-The Irish Terrier. Part 2
It has been felt that the descriptive points, originally drawn up by Mr. Ridgway, and agreed to by twenty-four others, is scarcely elaborated enough for the increasing difficulties that arise in disti...
-The Irish Terrier. Part 3
The only character cropping gives is that of mongrelism, and association with the lowest in taste and most uneducated of the fancy; good reasons can be shown for rounding, although they may not be u...
-Chapter XXVI. The White English Terrier
The white English terrier, like many other breeds, has undergone considerable modification since public dog shows came into being. How the modern dog of that name was manufactured I do not pretend to ...
-Chapter XXVII. The Airedale Or Bingley Terrier
The following first appeared in the Country newspaper, and led to correspondence, in which I was urged by breeders and owners to call the dog the Airedale, not the Bingley Terrier, as being more app...
-Chapter XXVIII. The Aberdeen Terrier
Varieties of the dog multiply, and in no class more than in the terriers. At one time terrier was the generic name for all and every vermin dog that was used to go to ground, and the name was restri...
-Chapter XXIX. Dog Showing
The exhibition of dogs has taken a strong hold on popular fancy, and is now a source of interest and pleasure to thousands in this country. When fairly and honestly conducted, competition at these ex...
-Dog Showing. Continued
Feeding I do not think it wise to adopt any strict formula in feeding, much must be left to the observation of the feeder, who will see that what does well for one does not answer with another in get...
-Chapter XXX. Standard Of Excellence For Dogs Useful To Man
I. Rough Coated Coiley POINTS. Head and muzzle............ 15 Eyes and ears......... 5 Neck and shoulders...... 10 Body, chest, back, loin...
-Division III. House And Toy Dogs
Group I. Dogs Which Are Distinct Varieties From Those Already Described Including: I. The Blenheim Spaniel. 2. The King Charles Spaniel. 3. The Pug. 4. The Pomeranian. 5. The Poodle. 6. The Mal...
-Chapter I. Toy Spaniels
At what date in the history of the human race ladies took to caressing small dogs I do not know, but the fashion is a very old one, and has been a very general one, if not universal, among nations at ...
-Chapter II. The Blenheim Spaniel
The modern Blenheim spaniel is a very different dog from the original of that name, so long kept by and associated with the Marlborough family. It is an instance of the breeder's skill exercised in a...
-Chapter III. The King Charles Spaniel
The Merry Monarch did many more foolish things than take under his royal care and favour, thereby raising to the position of a court idol, the beautiful toy spaniel that still bears his name. Harsh ...
-Chapter IV. The Pug
I am relieved from the necessity of following in the footsteps of every writer on pugs since the issue of Stonehenge's work in 1859. One and all of them have informed their readers that twenty, twen...
-The Pug. Part 2
Many ladies, by lavishing mistaken kindness on their pugs, do them serious harm. Over feeding, feeding too often, and on too rich diet, together with insufficient exercise, cause obesity, with a host ...
-The Pug. Part 3
If we are to have short legged dogs we shall have a race of King Koffees - that much overrated animal, whose conformation of body and legs approaches the dachshund. I think it would be interesting i...
-The Pug. Part 4
Mr. J. Brookes says: I have been a breeder of pugs some time, and have taken first prizes. The points often overlooked by judges are the moles on cheek and carriage of tail, which should be - bitch a...
-The Pug. Part 5
A great fault with many pugs shown now is coarseness of coat. It should be fine, smooth, soft, and glossy. The skin is extremely loose, and when a handful is taken, the coat, although thus handled, mu...
-Chapter V. The Pomeranian
This variety of the dog is now an established favourite in this country, although it has never attained the great popularity of some other breeds of house and companion dogs. He has been written of as...
-Chapter VI. The Poodle
In dogs ordinarily spoken of as poodles we find a multiplicity of type, which is doubtless to be accounted for by the commixture of pure poodle blood with that of other varieties. The poodle has been...
-Chapter VII. The Maltese Terrier
All English writers, new and old, that I have consulted, agree in one thing, and that is, that in centuries long past Malta furnished toy dogs for the dainty dames and mincing mistresses of both Gre...
-Chapter VIII. The Yorkshire Terrier
Nowhere in England are dog shows so popular, numerous, and flourishing as in the counties of Lancaster and York, and their immediate borders, and each of the two counties named has given us a new bree...
-Group II. Diminutives Of Already Mentioned Varieties And Foreign Toy Dogs Occasionally Met With At Our Shows
Including: 1. The Italian Greyhound. 2. The Black and Tan Toy Terrier, 3. The Blue and Tan Toy Terrier. 4. The White Toy Terrier. 5. The Long-haired Toy Terrier. 6. The Japanese Pug. 7. The Broken...
-Chapter IX. The Italian Greyhound
No more elegant dog exists than a good specimen of the Italian greyhound. There is in such a refinement of form and a grace in every movement that inevitably attracts the dog lover and compels his eu...
-Chapter X. The Black And Tan Toy Terrier
Some score years ago a large proportion of the black and tan toy terriers were of the sort called by fanciers apple-headed ones - that is, round skulled with prominent foreheads - and this variety o...
-Chapter XI. The Blue And Tan Toy Terrier
This very pretty toy dog receives scant justice at shows where he has either to compete against his black and tan brother, or take his place in a variety Class, and in either case generally goes down ...
-Chapter XII. The White Toy Terrier
Occasionally a diminutive white terrier of 31b. or 41b. weight turns up at a show, but they do not seem as yet to be looked on as worthy of distinct classification. Those I have seen have all been to...
-Chapter XIII. The Long-Haired Toy Terrier
In the classes for toy terriers other than smooth-haired, the winners are invariably small Yorkshire terriers, and it would be far better to make two classes for the last named, dividing them by weigh...
-Chapter XIV. The Japanese Pug
I must confess this is a dog I know very little about; they crop up, however, pretty often at our shows, and give one the impression of being a cross between a King Charles spaniel and a pug. In Jes...
-Chapter XV. The Broken-Haired Toy Terrier
These are, as their name imports, small broken-coated terriers, alike in every point but size to their larger congeners. They have to compete at shows against Yorkshires, which is unfair to them. The...
-Chapter XVI. The Chinese Crested Dog
This is quite a rarity in this country, but a few have been exhibited, and attracted considerable attention as curiosities. Rather higher than a fox terrier, they are also longer in the back, and alt...
-Chapter XVII. The Chinese Edible Dog
Dogs so described in catalogues and frequently shown are mostly of a rufous colour, and in appearance resemble Pomeranians, but are much coarser made. I know nothing further of them than having seen ...
-Chapter XVIII. Exhibiting Toy Dogs
The condition in which dogs are shown has much to do with their success or failure to secure the coveted premier position in the ring, and this is especially the case with toy dogs. These varieties a...
-Chapter XIX. Training Pet Dogs
The first thing to be taught a house dog is habits of cleanliness. It stands to reason that to ensure this the animal must be let out at regular intervals during the day, and this should be done both...
-Chapter XX. Standard Of Excellence For Toy Dogs
I. The Blenheim Spaniel And The King Charles Spaniel POINTS. Symmetry and condition..... 25 Head......... 15 Stop.......... 5 Muzz...
-Chapter I. Object Of Breeding
The immense rise in market value of dogs of all breeds during the last twenty years, as a consequence of the competition promoted and en-couraged by exhibitions and of the constant free and full discu...
-Chapter II. Dog Breeding
I shall not attempt to deal with the subject of breeding in all its aspects. There are many questions connected with it still unsettled, and, however interesting the discussion of these, this is not t...
-Dog Breeding. Continued
Superfaetation The bitch having a compound uterus is capable of impregnation by two or more dogs during the same heat, and will produce in one litter pups clearly distinguishable as the produce of di...
-Importance Of Pedigree
The foregoing shows the vast importance of pedigree, and on both sides this should be studied, and the prevailing family characteristics carefully considered. The kennel chronicles, calendars, stud bo...
-Cestrum Or Heat Of Bitches
The desire to reproduce is not constant in the dog, but occurs at periods varying in individuals even of the same variety, in some as often as every six months; but whether six, seven, or eight months...
-Impregnation
On this subject Blaine observes, that in some cases it takes place at the first connection, at others not until the second, third, or fourth, and states that in one instance he had decided proofs that...
-Antecedent Impressions
It is one of the most strange and remarkable facts, as it is one of the least understood in connection with breeding, that the union of a bitch for the first time with a dog by which she conceives fre...
-Chapter III. Rearing
REARING may properly be said to begin with the bitch in pup, for unless she is properly cared for, and kept in good health, she cannot be expected to produce strong healthy pups, or to be in a state t...
-Rearing. Continued
Treatment Of The Suckling Bitch For the first few days the food should consist of strong broth, bread and milk, oatmeal porridge and milk, and such like food, with but very little meat, and all shoul...
-Chapter IV. General Management
Kennels The first consideration on becoming possessed of a dog is where to keep him, and even if intended to be in the house he should have his own corner, mat, basket, or other place in which to sle...
-General Management. Continued
Fig. 1 gives the front view of the sleeping house, the side view of which may be seen at Fig. 3. This is made to lift bodily in one piece, and is built of red pine boards one inch thick, tongued and ...
-How To Feed Dogs
There is not much to be added on this subject to what has already been said in treating of dogs for show, page 385. In an ordinary way, when nothing special is required of the dogs, it is a great con...
-The Dog Exerciser
The harness used is something like that seen on our pug dogs, crossing the front of the chest and going round the body behind the fore legs; a strap is from this attached to the upright in which the s...
-Dog Grooming And Washing
These matters have already been amply treated in Chapter XXIX (The Irish Water Spaniel). I will merely add that when it is desired to get a matted coat into good condition, it helps greatly to well sa...









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