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Our Dogs And Their Diseases | by G. S. Heatley



There is no animal that appreciates our attention more, or is more worthy of our attachment, than the Dog. It appeals by instinct (or reason - which?) to our care, our affection, and protection. It possesses the capability of placing the utmost reliance and good faith upon those who use it considerately and kindly, and will fearlessly expose its life to imminent danger in order to guard and protect its friend from harm. Its courage, faithfulness, sagacity, endurance, honesty, gentleness, submission, including many other attributes, are unquestionably without a parallel in other domestic animals...

TitleOur Dogs And Their Diseases
AuthorG. S. Heatley
PublisherGeorge Routledge And Sons
Year1884
Copyright1884, George Routledge And Sons
AmazonOur Dogs and Their Diseases

By G. S. Heatley, M.R.C.V.S.

-Part I. Introduction
There is no animal that appreciates our attention more, or is more worthy of our attachment, than the Dog. It appeals by instinct (or reason - which?) to our care, our affection, and protection. It po...
-The Scotch Colley
The Scotch Colley resembles the English type in character, although it differs from that animal in form. It possesses a sharp nose, bright and mild eye, and a most sagacious aspect. Its body is abunda...
-The Lurcher. Canis Familiaris
This animal possesses many of the elements of the Collie, but is employed for far different purposes; in fact it is very seldom the companion of persons other than those of doubtful respectability. It...
-The Otterhound. Canis Familiaris
This animal is exclusively employed for the chase of the otter. It is a bold, hardy, active dog, which is in every sense requisite, as it has to encounter a fierce and hard-biting creature. Being for...
-The Bull-Dog. Canis Familiaris
The Bull-Dog is classified by all who have had the opportunity of judging of its capabilities to be the most courageous animal in the world, the game-cock excepted. This dog's extraordinary courage h...
-The Mastiff. Canis Familiaris
The Mastiff is the largest and most powerful of the indigenous English dogs. It possesses a singularly mild and placid temper, and seems to delight in employing its great powers in affording protectio...
-The Greyhound. Canis Familiaris
It is scarcely within the region of imagination to conceive an animal which is more entirely formed for speed and endurance than a well-bred greyhound. Its long slender legs, with their whip-cord-like...
-The Scotch Greyhound. Canis Familiaris
We will proceed now to the consideration of another valuable and important dog. Although it cannot be classed as a British one, nevertheless its true nobility of character is worthy of passing referen...
-The Newfoundland Dog. Canis Familiaris
This large and handsome animal derives its name from its native land. It is possessed of extraordinary mental powers, and is capable of instruction to a degree that is rarely seen in any domestic anim...
-The Pomeranian Dog. Canis Familiaris
This little animal has sprung into notoriety almost suddenly, it is affectionately treated as ft household pet and companion. It has undoubtedly become a great favourite, and is really intelligent in ...
-The St. Bernard's Dog. Canis Familiaris
This splendid specimen of a dog is the largest of the canine race. It derives its title from the celebrated monastery of that name. They are taught to exercise the wondrous powers with which they are ...
-The Retriever Dog. Canis Familiaris
These animals derive their name from their occupation, that is, in retrieving or recovering game that has fallen out of the reach of the sportsman, or on which he does not choose to expend the labour ...
-The English Setter. Canis Familiaris
This dog has earned its title from its customary habit of crouching or setting when it perceives its game. There are several breeds of these animals, and each breed possesses its own particular exce...
-Pointers. Canis Familiaris
Here we have a representation of two breeds of the Pointer, the two foremost dogs being examples of the English Pointer, the third representing the Spanish Pointer; this latter animal is seldom used f...
-The Bloodhound. Canis familiaris
Here we have a magnificent illustration of the animal termed the Bloodhound In olden times this animal was largely resorted to for tracking and securing robbers, sheep-stealers, murderers, etc. In fac...
-The Staghound. Canis Familiaris
Intimately blended with the Bloodhound is this now rare Staghound. It is supposed to have derived its origin from the Bloodhound and Greyhound, this latter animal being employed on account of its supe...
-The Beagle. Canis Familiaris
There are several breeds of this animal, which are distinguished from each other by their size and general aspect. The ordinary Beagle is not unlike the Harrier, but is heavier about the throat th...
-The Foxhound. Canis Familiaris
Few animals have received more attention and judicious care than the Foxhound, and few have so absolutely fulfilled and warranted the expectations that were entertained concerning him; while few have ...
-Part II. Hydrophobia Or Rabies
The special characteristic, and what is considered an important diagnostic sign, is the absolute horror or dread of water. This being, for the most part, a very striking symptom of the fatal indisposi...
-Hydrophobia Or Rabies. Part 2
But though it be well known that animals of the dog and cat kinds can propagate the disorder, it is not definitely settled whether it can be communicated by other animals. Some authorities declare tha...
-Hydrophobia Or Rabies. Part 3
The symptom which is most frequently first observed in a rabid dog is a certain peculiarity in its manner, that is to say, you will notice some strange departure from its usual habits. In a very great...
-Hydrophobia Or Rabies. Part 4
Now it is remarked by travellers that the Egyptian dogs are almost in a state of inaction during the day; they lie down in the shade near vessels full of fresh water, prepared by the natives. They onl...
-Hydrophobia Or Rabies. Part 5
On the 27th January 1780, fifteen individuals were bit by a mad dog, and attended at Senlis by the Commissioners of the French Royal Society of Physic. Ten had received the bites on the naked flesh, a...
-Hydrophobia Or Rabies. Part 6
In the stomachs of dogs which died rabid Dr. Gillman constantly observed traces of inflammation, and he tried to communicate the disease to rabbits by inoculating them with matter taken from pustules ...
-Hydrophobia Or Rabies. Part 7
Symptoms With regard to the symptoms of hydrophobia, they are generally tardy in making their appearance, a considerable but a very variable space of time usually elapsing between their commencement ...
-Hydrophobia Or Rabies. Part 8
Now, regarding the accuracy of the foregoing statement by Dr. Marcot, there is no doubt the observation, however, in regard to the irritation not affecting the absorbents, was long ago anticipated by ...
-Hydrophobia Or Rabies. Part 9
She could swallow fresh currants with less resistance than anything else, taking care that they were perfectly dry. Her mind had till now been quite calm and composed, and her conversation and behavi...
-Hydrophobia Or Rabies. Part 10
Again, the dread of swallowing liquids, though the most singular symptom of the disease, constitutes but a small part of it. It is true that none, or at least very few, recover who have this symptom; ...
-Hydrophobia Or Rabies. Part 11
Again, the bite of a naturally ferocious beast has often been thought to be attended with more risk than that of an animal naturally tame; and hence the bite of a wolf is said to be more frequently fo...
-Hydrophobia Or Rabies. Part 12
Treatment Happily surgery possesses one tolerably certain means of preventing hydrophobia, when it is practised in time and in a complete manner. Every reader will immediately conclude that the exci...
-Hydrophobia Or Rabies. Part 13
As for belladonna, its employment for the prevention and cure of hydrophobia is very ancient. Its external use for this purpose has been mentioned by Pliny, and its internal, with the same view, as fa...
-Hydrophobia Or Rabies. Part 14
Galvanism has also been tried and found wanting. Again, the rapid and powerful effects of the bite of a viper on the whole system, and perhaps the idea that the operation of this animal's venom might ...
-Part III. Fractures
These constitute so interesting a subject in connection with the ailments of the dog, that we are bound to bestow upon them earnest and due consideration; besides, the more scientific and successful v...
-The Differences Of Fractures
The differences of fractures depend upon what bone is broken, what portion of it is fractured, the direction of the fracture, the respective position of the fragments, and lastly, upon circumstances a...
-The Causes Of Fractures
The Causes of Fractures are divided into Predisposing and Remote. In the first class are comprehended the situations and functions of the bones, the age of the patients and their diseases. Superficia...
-Symptoms Of Fractures
Some of the symptoms of fracture are certainly ambiguous. The pain and inability to move the limb commonly enumerated may arise from a mere bruise, a dislocation, or other cause; but the crepitus, the...
-Prognosis Of Fractures
The prognosis of fractures varies according to the kind of bone injured, what part of it is broken, the direction of the breach of continuity, and what other mischief complicates the case. Fractures o...
-Treatment Of Fractures
Now the treatment embraces three principal indications. The first is to reduce the pieces of bone into their natural situation; the second is to secure and keep them in this state; and the third is to...
-Composition Of The Bones
Before entering upon the diseases that are peculiar to bones, it will be advantageous to the reader to understand the structure and composition of the material that supports the weight of the animal, ...
-Diseases Of The Bones. Rachitis, Or Rickets
When bones are deficient in earthy matter, we generally find rachitis present. This disease, then, may even take place in the fcetus in utero, but the most common period is when the animals are young...
-Caries
This is a disease worthy of serious investigation - one, in fact, that we cannot lightly slip, because it is of great importance. It is a disease of the bones, supposed to be very analogous to ulcerat...
-Necrosis
This word, the strict meaning of which is only mortification, is by general consent confined to this affection of the bones It was first used in this particular sense by the old writers, who restricte...
-Causes Of Necrosis
Some of the causes are external, while others are internal or constitutional. Sometimes the life of the bone is instantaneously destroyed by them; but in other instances, the bone is first stimulated,...
-Signs Of Necrosis
Let us next endeavour to trace the signs by which we may not only ascertain the presence of the disease, but its modifications. In the first place, we should make ourselves acquainted with everything...
-Part IV. Inflammation, Etc
This, as the term signifies, a setting on fire, is so alarming, that whenever the expression escapes the speaker's lips, the announcement is received by every one conversant with the ailments of the l...
-Inflammation, Etc. Part 2
Dr. James objects to the division of inflammation into the acute, sub-acute, or chronic. He says that in many instances these are merely different stages of the same disease. The arrangement into the ...
-Inflammation, Etc. Part 3
There is much foundation for believing that healthy inflammation is invariably a homogeneous process, obedient to ordinary principles, and that in similar structures, situations, and constitutions it ...
-Fever
The fever about to be described to the reader is known and distinguished by several names, some calling it inflammatory, some symptomatic, and others sympathetic. It is also supposed by some to be idi...
-Fever. Continued
Again, though the redness, swelling, throbbing, tension, and other symptoms of inflammation are less manifest when the affection is deeply seated, yet their existence is undoubted. When an animal dies...
-Obstruction
Boerhaave entertained the theory that inflammation was caused by an impediment to the free circulation of the blood in the minute vessels; and this obstruction, he supposed, might be caused by heat, d...
-Obstruction. Part 2
Now, with respect to this theory, which has deservedly had vast influence in regulating the judgment of professional men on the nature of the process called inflammation, it cannot be received in the ...
-Obstruction. Part 3
But it must be remembered that several difficulties remain, upon which experiments throw no light For why does a failure of power of small extent in the capillaries of a vital part strongly excite, no...
-Obstruction. Part 4
Again, in the course of Dr. Hastings' inquiry, it is proved that the healthy circulation of the blood essentially depends upon a due degree of action in the vessels throughout the system; that the app...
-Obstruction. Part 5
Redness Healthy inflammation is of a pale red, when less healthy it is of a darker shade; but, according to Dr. Hunter, the inflamed parts in every constitution will partake more of the healthy red t...
-The Terminations Of Inflammation
Inflammation is said to have several different terminations; or, in other words, we may say that after this process has continued for a certain time, it either subsides entirely, occasions the ...
-Treatment Of Inflammation
The first step that requires to be taken is to ascertain without delay what the cause is of inflammation; having satisfied yourself, the next duty you have to perform is the removal of the exciting ca...
-Mortification
Mortification is of two kinds; the one without any or much inflammation, the other preceded and accompanied by it To this last species of mortification, the terms inflammatory, humid, or acute gangren...
-Mortification. Continued
It is commonly taught in Continental schools that the internal causes probably operate after the manner of a deleterious substance, which, being introduced into the circulation, occasions a putrefacti...
-Tumours
According to the language of Abernethy, a tumour consists in a swelling arising from some new production which made no part of the original composition of the body. Now, in considering all the vari...
-Sarcomatous Tumours
These have been so named from their firm fleshy feel They are of many kinds, some of which are simple, while others are complicated with a malignant tendency. Under the title of common vascular or org...
-Adipose Sarcoma Or Fatty Tumours
As the substance of adipose tumours is never furnished with very large bloodvessels, the fear of hemorrhage need not deter us from operating, because it is an undoubted fact that there is no species o...
-Encysted Tumours
Are generally of a roundish shape, and more elastic than the generality of fleshy swellings. However, the latter circumstance depends very much upon the nature of their contents and the thickness of t...
-Ulceration
This is the process by which sores or ulcers are produced in animal bodies. In this operation, the lymphatics are commonly believed to be at least as active as the bloodvessels; an ulcer being, accord...
-Ulcers
May be defined as a solution of continuity in any of the soft parts of the body, attended with a secretion of pus, or some kind of discharge. A granulating surface secreting matter has been proposed...
-Suppuration
is a process by which a peculiar fluid termed pus is formed in the substance, or from the surface of parts of the body. When purulent matter accumulates in the part affected, it is termed an alscess,...
-Theory Of Suppuration
The dissolution of the living solids of an animal body into pus, as an essential part of the process of suppuration, and the power of the fluid to continue the dissolution, are opinions which are no l...
-The Qualities Of Pus
True pus has certain properties which, when taken singly, may belong to other secretions, but which conjointly form the peculiar character of this fluid, namely, globules swimming in a fluid which is ...
-The Use Of Pus
The secretion of pus has been looked upon as a general prevention of many or of all the causes of disease. Hence issues have been made to keep off universal as well as local diseases. However, the use...
-The Treatment Of Abscesses
In cases of inflammation arising from external violence, but so circumstanced that suppuration cannot be prevented, the indication is to moderate the inflammation, which, if the injury be considerable...
-The Opening Of Abscesses
Abscesses situated in the region of the neck, chest, or abdomen should be opened without delay, in order to prevent with certainty the effusion of pus inwardly. Certain abscesses of the neck call for ...
-Dressings For Abscesses
When an abscess has burst of itself, the surrounding skin is to be kept clean, and the emollient applications are to be continued until the discharge has considerably diminished, and the accompanying ...
-Wounds
A wound may be defined to be a recent solution of continuity in the soft parts, suddenly occasioned by external causes, and attended at first with more or less hemorrhage. Wounds in general are subje...
-Incised Wounds
As a general observation, it may be stated that a wound made with a sharp cutting instrument (a mere incision) is attended with less hazard of dangerous consequences than any other kind of wound whats...
-Contused And Lacerated Wounds
Lacerated wounds are those in which the fibres, instead of being divided by a cutting instrument, have been torn asunder by some violence capable of overcoming their force of cohesion. The edges of su...
-Punctured Wounds
A punctured wound signifies one made with a narrow pointed instrument, the external orifice of the injury being small and contracted, instead of being of a size proportionate to its depth. A wound pro...
-Poisoned Wounds
If we exclude from present consideration the bites of mad dogs and other rabid animals, this will reduce and limit the number to those inflicted by wasps, hornets, etc. The stings of these insects ar...
-Diseases Of The Liver
The liver is a highly organised gland, situated in the abdominal cavity; it is the largest secreting gland in the body, and manufactures that element known as bile. Modern science has also discovered ...
-Intestinal Concretions
Comprehending under this head both gall-stones and other concretions, we will first, then, observe that some hepatic concretions cannot pass from the place of their origin into the intestines, but onl...
-Acute Hepatitis, Or Inflammation Of The Liver
This disease rarely occurs as an idiopathic affection, but it is commonly met with in the ox in the chronic form. It may be brought on by the animal being highly fed without receiving any exercise, or...
-Chronic Hepatitis
In this disease the primary symptoms are not well defined, but for some considerable time the animal will be found dull and listless, and evince little desire to move; the appetite is very capricious,...
-Icterus Or Jaundice
This disease is called in some parts of the country Golden Pheasant, from its distinguishing and characteristic symptom being yellowness of the mucous membrane. It generally follows low debilitating ...
-Biliary Calculi, Or Gall Stones
These are commonly met with in the ducts of the liver, but as I have dwelt upon concretions, in general, we will only require to add here a few additional symptoms in order to assist in the proper dia...
-Aneurism
The tumours which are formed by a preternatural dilation of a part of an artery, as well as those swellings which are occasioned by a collection of arterial blood effused in the cellular tissue in con...
-Bronchitis, Or Inflammation Of The Bronchial Tubes
This disease may be confined to the parent tube, or it may extend to the ultimate ramifications of the smaller branches. There is an increased secretion of mucus collecting in the inferior parts of th...
-Pneumonia, Or Inflammation Of The Lungs
attacks all animals that we have to do with, the causes being similar to those producing catarrh and other affections of the same nature. In health the lungs are of a beautiful pink colour, highly el...
-Common Gold, Catarrh, And Laryngitis
may be classed together, as there is a sameness of symptoms attending them that is sometimes difficult to separate. We will therefore consider them collectively, as the same remedies that are employed...
-Ascites, Or Abdominal Dropsy
may occur as a sequel to peritonitis, and is an accumulation of fluid in the abdominal cavity. When swelling extends equally over the whole abdomen, the fluid is usually diifused among all the viscera...
-Prolapsus Ani
but more correctly speaking, prolapsus recti, is a common disease met with in all domestic animals; it occurs in three forms. In one the protrusion of the rectum involves both its mucous and muscular ...
-Distemper
Few young dogs have immunity from this affection, and if you are bent upon purchasing or selling a young animal, the first query that is invariably put is, Is he over the distemper? This disease is...
-Kennel Lameness Or Rheumatism
This is another very common disease in the dog, due to frequent and constant exposure to cold and wet; it is often produced through damp, uncomfortable kennels. Dogs that are exposed to varied tempera...
-Canker Of The Ears
Water-dogs are specially liable to canker of the internal ears, owing to the fluid producing irritation by not being properly dried out of the ear. The animal shakes his head continually, thereby exci...
-Mange
As a rule, all skin diseases which affect the dog are positively due to carelessness or neglect in some way or other, and mostly all of them are easily removed by a change of diet, a dose of physic, a...
-Worms
These destroy, I believe, quite as many puppies as distemper, and are a fertile source of disease. Some authorities believe that the ova remain in kennels from year to year attached either to the wall...









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previous page: How To Train Dogs And Cats | by Frederick H. Erb, Jr
  
page up: Dog Books
  
next page: Nursing Vs. Dosing: A Treatise On The Care Of Dogs In Health And Disease | by Stephen Tillinghas Hammond