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Things To Make | by Archibald Williams



The making for oneself of toys and other objects of a more or less useful character has certain advantages over buying them. In the case of the more elaborate and costly articles, it may enable one to possess things which otherwise would be unobtainable. Secondly, a home-made article may give a satisfaction more lasting than is conferred by a bought one, though it may be less beautiful to look upon. Thirdly, the mere making should be a pleasure, and must be an education in itself.

TitleThings To Make
AuthorArchibald Williams
PublisherThomas Nelson And Sons, Ltd.
Year1918
Copyright1918, Thomas Nelson And Sons, Ltd.
AmazonThings to Make

By Archibald Williams, Author Of "Victories Of The Engineer," How It Works," "How It Is Made," Etc., Etc.

Things to Make
-Preface
The making for oneself of toys and other objects of a more or less useful character has certain advantages over buying them. In the case of the more elaborate and costly articles, it may enable one to...
-I. A Sawing Trestle
A strong and stable sawing trestle is one of the most important accessories of the carpenter's shop, whether amateur or professional. The saw is constantly being used, and for it to do its work accura...
-II. A Joiners Bench
AFTER finishing his sawing trestle the reader may be willing to undertake a larger job, the manufacture of a joiner's bench--if he does not already possess a good article--heavy and rigid enough to st...
-III. A Handy Bookstand
A bookstand of the kind shown in Fig. 7 has two great advantages: first, it holds the books in such a position that their titles are read more easily than when the books stand vertically; second, it c...
-IV. A House Ladder
The preparation and putting together of the parts of a ladder having round, tapered rungs let into holes in the two sides is beyond the capacity of the average young amateur; but little skill is neede...
-V. A Developing Sink
Many amateur photographers are obliged to do their developing in odd corners and under conditions which render the hobby somewhat irksome if a large number of plates have to be treated. The main diffi...
-VI. A Poultry House And Run
This chapter should be of interest to the keeper of poultry on a small scale, for even if the instructions given are not followed out quite as they stand, they may suggest modifications to suit the ta...
-VII. A Shed For Your Bicycle
The problem, how to house one or more cycles, often gives trouble to the occupiers of small premises. The hall-way, which in many cases has to serve as stable, is sadly obstructed by the handles of a ...
-VII. A Shed For Your Bicycle. Continued
Construction The scale drawings are so complete as to dimensions that, assuming the materials to be of the sizes specified, they may be followed implicitly. It is, of course, easy to modify the desig...
-VII. A Target Apparatus For Rifle Shooting
The base is a 1-inch board, 18 inches long and 7 inches wide. The target-holder is a piece of wood 1-1/2 inches square, and a couple of inches longer than the side of the largest target to be used. T...
-IX. Cabinet-Making. A Match-Box Cabinet
This is useful for the storage of small articles, such as stamps, pens, seeds, needles, and a number of other minor things which easily go astray if put in a drawer with larger objects. The best boxe...
-A Cardboard Cabinet
We now proceed to a more ambitious undertaking -- the manufacture of a cabinet for the storage of note-paper, envelopes, labels, etc. The only materials needed are some cardboard and glue; the tools, ...
-A Cigar-Box Cabinet
At the rate of a halfpenny or less apiece one may buy the cigar boxes made to hold twenty-five cigars. These boxes, being fashioned by machinery, are all -- at any rate all those devoted to a particul...
-A Tool Cabinet
The wooden cabinet shown in Fig. 30 is constructed, as regards its case, in the same way as that just described, but the drawers are built up of several pieces. The over-all dimensions of the cabinet ...
-X. Telegraphic Apparatus
The easily made but practical apparatus described in this chapter supplies an incentive for learning the Morse telegraphic code, which is used for sending sound signals, and for visible signals transm...
-A Morse Tapper Or Sounder
In postal telegraph offices a sounder, and not a buzzer, is generally used to communicate the signals. Instead of a continuous noise, lasting as long as the key at the transmitting station is held...
-Batteries
The dry cells used for electric bells are the most convenient batteries to use. They can now be purchased at all prices from a shilling upwards, and give about 1-1/2 volts when in good condition. One ...
-XI. A Reciprocating Electric Motor
The electric motor to be treated in this chapter illustrates very prettily the attractive force of a hollow, wire-wound bobbin on a movable core, when the electric current is passed through the wire. ...
-XII. An Electric Alarm Clock
Anybody who possesses an alarm clock with an external gong, an electric bell, and a battery, may easily make them combine to get the drowsiest of mortals out of bed on the chilliest of winter mornings...
-XIII. A Model Electric Railway
The rapid increase in the number of electrically worked railways, and the substitution of the electric for the steam locomotive on many lines, give legitimate cause for wondering whether, twenty or so...
-XIII. A Model Electric Railway. Part 2
General The sleepers of straight sections are screwed down to 3/4 by 1/4 inch longitudinals, which help to keep the track straight and prevent the sleepers slipping. Sections should be of the same le...
-XIII. A Model Electric Railway. Part 3
The Electric Locomotive An elevation and a plan of this are given in Fig. 47. The two pairs of wheels are set close together, so that they may pass easily round curves. The Motor A motor of ordinar...
-XIV. A Simple Reciprocating Engine
Figs. 51 and 52 illustrate a very simple form of fixed-cylinder engine controlled by a slide valve. An open-ended trunk piston, similar in principle to that used in gas engines, is employed; and th...
-XV. A Horizontal Slide-Valve Engine
The reader who has succeeded in putting together the simple engine described in the preceding chapter may wish to try his hand on something more ambitious in the same line. The engine illustrated in F...
-XV. A Horizontal Slide-Valve Engine. Part 2. Cylinder Standards
Use 5/64 or 3/32 inch brass plate for these. Two pieces of the dimensions shown in Fig. 56 are needed. Scratch a line exactly down the middle of each, and a cross line 1/2 inch from one end. The other...
-XV. A Horizontal Slide-Valve Engine. Part 3. The Steam Ways
The formation of the steam ways between valve plate and cylinder is the most ticklish bit of work to be done on the engine as it entails the making of a number of solder joints close together. We beg...
-XV. A Horizontal Slide-Valve Engine. Part 4
The Eccentric This can be formed by soldering two thin brass discs 1-15/16- inch diameter concentrically to the sides of a disc of 1-15/16-inch diameter and 5/16 inch thick. The centre of the shaft h...
-XV. A Horizontal Slide-Valve Engine. Part 5
The Pump Fig. 65 shows in section the pump, which will be found a useful addition to the engine. (For other details, see Figs. 53 and 54.) Its stroke is only that of the eccentric, and as the water p...
-XVI. Model Steam Turbines
Steam turbines have come very much to the fore during recent years, especially for marine propulsion. In principle they are far simpler than cylinder engines, steam being merely directed at a suitable...
-A Practical Steam Turbine
The next step takes us to the construction of a small turbine capable of doing some useful work. It is shown in cross section and elevation in Fig. 69. The rotor in this instance is enclosed in a cas...
-A More Elaborate Turbine
The turbine just described can hardly be termed an efficient one, as the vanes, owing to their simple formation, are not shaped to give good results. We therefore offer to our readers a design for a ...
-XVII. Steam Tops
A very interesting and novel application of the steam turbine principle is to substitute for a wheel running in fixed bearings a free wheel pivoted on a vertical spindle, the point of which takes th...
-XVIII. Model Boilers
A chapter devoted to the construction of model boilers may well open with a few cautionary words, as the dangers connected with steam-raisers are very real; and though model-boiler explosions are fort...
-A Vertical Boiler
The vertical boiler illustrated by Fig. 80 is easily made. The absence of a water jacket to the furnace is partly compensated by fitting six water-tubes in the bottom. As shown, the barrel is 8 inches...
-A Horizontal Boiler
The boiler illustrated by Fig. 81 is designed for heating with a large paraffin or petrol blow-lamp. It has considerably greater water capacity, heating surface --the furnace being entirely enclosed ...
-A Multitubular Boiler
Figs. 86 and 87 are respectively end and side elevations of a multitubular boiler having over 600 square inches of heating surface -- most of it contributed by the tubes -- and intended for firing wi...
-Boiler Fittings
Safety Valves The best all-round type is that shown in Fig. 89. There is no danger of the setting being accidentally altered, as is very possible with a lever and sliding weight. The valve should be ...
-Quick Boiling Kettles
The principles of increasing the area of heating surface in model boilers may be applied very practically to the common kettle. The quick-boiling kettle is useful for camping out, for heating the mor...
-Fire-Tube Kettles
The tubing of Figs. 96 (a) and 96 (b) presents a little difficulty in each case. The straight tube is the more difficult to insert, owing to the elliptical shape of the ends; whereas the bent tube req...
-XX. A Hot-Air Engine
The pretty little toy about to be described is interesting as a practical application to power-producing purposes of the force exerted by expanding air. It is easy to make, and, for mere demonstration...
-XX. A Hot-Air Engine. Continued
Attaching The Cylinder Scratch a bold line through the centre of one of the crank holes to the bottom of the barrel, to act as guide. Drill a 5/32-inch hole in the barrel on this line just below plat...
-XXI. A Water Motor
Fig. 105 is a perspective view of a simple water motor which costs little to make, and can be constructed by anybody able to use carpenter's tools and a soldering iron. It will serve to drive a very s...
-XXII. Model Pumps
Every steam boiler which has to run for long periods and evaporate considerable quantities of water should be in connection with a pump capable of forcing water in against the highest pressure used. O...
-XXIII. Kites
Plain Rectangular Box Kites The plain box kite is easy to make and a good flier. Readers should try their hands on it before attempting more complicated models. Lifting pressure is exerted only on t...
-XXIII. Kites. Part 2. Diamond Box Kites
In another type of box kite the boxes have four equal sides, but the boxes are rhombus-shaped, as in Fig. 116, the long diagonal being square to the wind, and the bridle attached at the front corner....
-XXIII. Kites. Part 3. The Boxes
Cut off 2 yards 8 inches of material quite squarely, fold down the middle, crease, and cut along the crease. This gives two pieces 80 by 15 inches. Double-stitch tape along the edges of each piece. ...
-XXIV. Paper Gliders
In this chapter are brought to your notice some patterns of paper gliders which, if made and handled carefully, prove very satisfactory. Gliders are sensitive and moody things, so that first experim...
-XXV. A Self-Launching Model Aeroplane
By V. E. Johnson, M.A. This article deals not with a scale model -- a small copy of some full-sized machine -- but with one designed for actual flight; with one not specially intended to create recor...
-XXV. A Self-Launching Model Aeroplane. Continued
Horizontal Spars, Etc To consider now the horizontal section or part plan of the model, from which, to avoid confusion, details of most vertical parts are omitted. Referring to Fig. 133, it will be s...
-XXVI. Apparatus For Simple Scientific Experiments
Colour Discs For The Gramophone The gramophone, by virtue of its table revolving at a controllable speed, comes in useful for a series of optical experiments made with coloured discs bearing designs ...
-XXVI. Apparatus For Simple Scientific Experiments. Continued
A Pneumatic Puzzle For the very simple apparatus illustrated by Fig. 147 one needs only half a cotton reel, three pins, and a piece of glass or metal tubing which fits the hole in the reel. Adjust a ...
-XXVII. A Rain-Gauge
The systematic measurement of rainfall is one of those pursuits which prove more interesting in the doing than in the prospect. It enables us to compare one season or one year with another; tells us w...
-XXVIII. Wind Vanes With Dials
It is difficult to tell from a distance in which direction the arrow of a wind vane points when the arrow lies obliquely to the spectator, or points directly towards or away from him. In the case of a...
-XXIX. A Strength-Testing Machine
The penny-in-the-slot strength-testing machine is popular among men and boys, presumably because many of them like to show other people what their muscles are capable of, and the opportunity of provin...
-Lung-Testing Apparatus
The capacity of the lungs, and their powers of inspiration and expiration, can be tested by means of easily constructed apparatus which will interest most people who are introduced to it. The reductio...
-A Pressure Recorder
[Transcribers note: Even with the precautions used in this project, health standards of 2004 would consider any exposure to mercury dangerous. Water could be substituted and the column lengths scaled ...
-I. Home-Made Harmonographs
Have you ever heard of the harmonograph? If not, or if at the most you have very hazy ideas as to what it is, let me explain. It is an instrument for recording on paper, or on some other suitable surf...
-I. Home-Made Harmonographs. Part 2
Value Of The Harmonograph A small portable harmonograph will be found to be a good means of entertaining friends at home or elsewhere. The gradual growth of the figure, as the card moves to and fro u...
-I. Home-Made Harmonographs. Part 3
Adjustment Of Weights As lead is too soft a metal to give a satisfactory purchase to a screw--a thread cut in it soon wears out--it is better to support a leaden weight from underneath by means of a ...
-Details Of Harmonographs
The reader may be interested in details of the apparatus shown in Figs. 168 and 170, made by the writer. The Rectilinear Harmonograph, shown in Fig. 168, has pendulums of 5/8-inch wood, 40 inches lon...
-II. A Self-Supplying Matchbox
This useful little article can be constructed in a couple of hours by a handy person. In general idea it consists of a diamond-shaped box to hold vestas, working up and down diagonally on a vertical m...
-III. A Wooden Workbox
The box illustrated by Fig. 181 was copied from an article of Norwegian manufacture. Its construction is an extremely simple matter, provided that one can get a piece of easily bent wood (birch, for i...
-IV. Wrestling Puppets
The expenditure of a halfpenny, and a quarter of an hour's use of a pocket knife, bradawl, and pliers, will produce a toy which is warranted to amuse grown-ups as well as children. Wrestlers made out ...
-V. Double Bellows
The small-sized bellows which have become popular in sitting-rooms are usually more ornamental than efficient, and make one think regretfully of the old-fashioned article of ample capacity which is se...
-VI. A Home-Made Pantograph
The pantograph is a simple apparatus for copying drawings, maps, designs, etc., on a reduced or enlarged scale, or to the same size as the original. A sketch of a pantograph is given in Fig. 186. Fo...
-VII. A Silhouette Drawing Machine
With this very simple apparatus you will be able to give good entertainment to such of your friends as may wish to have black paper records of their faces in profile. The machine is merely a long rod...
-VIII. A Signalling Lamp
Visual signalling is effected at night in the Morse code by means of a lamp fitted with an easily-moved shutter, which passes or cuts off the light at the will of the operator. Readers who know the Mo...
-IX. A Miniature Gasworks
The most primitive method of making coal gas on a small scale is to fill a tin--which must have folded, not soldered, joints--with small coal, punch a hole in the bottom, and place it lid downwards in...









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previous page: The Boy Mechanic Vol. 2 1000 Things for Boys to Do
  
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