- The very best known, as it saves time, labor, clothes and soap: One pound sal-soda, one-half pound stone lime, five quarts soft water, (some add one-fifth pound borax); boil a short time in copper or brass kettle, stirring occasionally, let settle and pour off the clear fluid into a stone jug, and cork for use; soak white clothes over night in simple water, wring out and soap wristbands, collars, and dirty stained places; have boiler half filled with water, and when at scalding heat put in one common teacup of fluid, stir and put in clothes, and boil half an hour, rub lightly through one suds only, rinsing well in the bluing water as usual, and all is complete. Instead of soaking clothes over night, they may soak in suds for a few hours before beginning washing. For each additional boiler of clothes, add half a cup only of the fluid, of course boiling in the same water through the whole washing. If more water is needed in the boiler for the last clothes, dip it from the sudsing tub. This fluid brightens instead of fading the colors in calico, and is good for colored flannels. It does not rot clothes, but they must not lie long in the water; the boiling, sudsing, rinsing and bluing must follow each other in rapid succession, until clothes are hung on the line, which should be by ten o'clock in the morning. Some of this fluid, put in hot water, is excellent for removing grease spots from the floor, doors and windows; also for cleansing tin-ware, pots, and kettles. - Mrs. Rose Sharp, Kingston, 0.