Table III

Estimate of the Approximate Annual Receipts from a Mixed Market Garden of 10 Acres, Established 10 Years

s.

d.

2 ac. half-standard Apple trees, 160 to acre = 320 trees at 15s. each ...

240

0

0

2 ac. bush Apple trees, 300 to the acre = 600 trees at 8s. each...

240

0

0

3 ac. bush Plums and Pyramid Pears, 300 to acre = 900 trees at 8s. each

360

0

0

3000 Gooseberry bushes, between 2 ac. half-standard Apple trees, at 1s. each ...

150

0

0

1500 Currant bushes, between 2 ac. bush Apple trees, at 2s. each

150

0

0

3000 Raspberry stools, between 3 ac. of Plums and Pears, at 1s. each...

150

0

0

4 houses Cucumbers, 2000 doz. fruits at 1s. 6d.

150

0

0

4 houses Tomatoes, 2000 plants with 10,000 lb. fruit...

125

0

0

Bedding stuff, Chrysanthemums, bulbs, hardy flowers, Mushrooms, etc....

250

0

0

2 ac. vegetables at 10s. per rod ...

160

0

0

Total receipts...

1975

0

0

Assuming that the expenses each year are 1332, as stated in Table II, it will be seen that as time goes on the net profits rise up to 643 per annum. It must of course be understood that these figures are only estimates, and are subject to fluctuation one way or the other. The fluctuations, however, are more likely to be on the receipt side than on the expense side. The latter one is always fairly certain about, and such items as labour, manure, horse keep, rates and taxes, etc, are definite in character. If the cultivator could only be as sure of the receipts from the items given on the revenue side he would have no objection to spending the money to earn it. Unfortunately, however, he has no control over the spring frosts, which may reduce his anticipated return of 1290 from 1820 fruit trees and 7500 Gooseberry, Currant, and Raspberry bushes to the odd 290, thus ensuring a dead loss of 1000 on these crops alone in some seasons. It is, however, only by making these estimates of receipts and expenses as accurately as possible on paper that the intelligent cultivator is enabled to see the possibilities for gain or loss in his particular business. The writer is well aware that some growers realize far better prices than are given in the tables above; but, on the other hand, there are also many who never realize them, chiefly because they are unable or afraid to spend a sufficient amount in cultivation.

The crops given in the table are merely for the purposes of illustration, and to show how similar estimates may be prepared for other crops. Thus, growers of Palms, Ferns, Liliums, Aspidistras, Crotons and Dracaenas, Carnations, Grapes, and a host of other plants referred to in this work may all be treated in a similar manner.