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Jane Eyre. An Autobiography | by Charlotte Bronte



A novel of intense power and intrigue, Jane Eyre has dazzled generations of readers with its depiction of a woman's quest for freedom. This updated edition features a new introduction discussing the novel's political and magical dimensions.

TitleJane Eyre. An Autobiography
AuthorCharlotte Bronte
PublisherService & Paton
Year1897
Copyright1897, Service & Paton
AmazonJane Eyre

Illustrated By F. H. Townsend

London Service & Paton 5 Henrietta Street 1897

The Illustrations In This Volume Are The Copyright Of Service & Paton, London

To W. M. Thackeray, Esq.,

This Work Is Respectfully Inscribed

By The Author

-Preface
A preface to the first edition of Jane Eyre being unnecessary, I gave none: this second edition demands a few words both of acknowledgment and miscellaneous remark. My thanks are due in three quart...
-Note To The Third Edition
I avail myself of the opportunity which a third edition of Jane Eyre affords me, of again addressing a word to the Public, to explain that my claim to the title of novelist rests on this one work al...
-Chapter I
There was no possibility of taking a walk that day. We had been wandering, indeed, in the leafless shrubbery an hour in the morning; but since dinner (Mrs. Reed, when there was no company, dined early...
-Chapter II
I resisted all the way: a new thing for me, and a circumstance which greatly strengthened the bad opinion Bessie and Miss Abbot were disposed to entertain of me. The fact is, I was a trifle beside mys...
-Chapter II. Continued
Superstition was with me at that moment; but it was not yet her hour for complete victory: my blood was still warm; the mood of the revolted slave was still bracing me with its bitter vigour; I had to...
-Chapter III
The next thing I remember is, waking up with a feeling as if I had had a frightful nightmare, and seeing before me a terrible red glare, crossed with thick black bars. I heard voices, too, speaking wi...
-Chapter III. Part 2
Bessie had now finished dusting and tidying the room, and having washed her hands, she opened a certain little drawer, full of splendid shreds of silk and satin, and began making a new bonnet for Geor...
-Chapter III. Part 3
Perhaps you may - who knows? Have you any relations besides Mrs. Reed? I think not, sir. None belonging to your father? I don't know. I asked Aunt Reed once, and she said possibly I might ha...
-Chapter IV
From my discourse with Mr. Lloyd, and from the above reported conference between Bessie and Abbot, I gathered enough of hope to suffice as a motive for wishing to get well: a change seemed near, - I d...
-Chapter IV. Part 2
It was the fifteenth of January, about nine o'clock in the morning: Bessie was gone down to breakfast; my cousins had not yet been summoned to their mama; Eliza was putting on her bonnet and warm gard...
-Chapter IV. Part 3
So much? was the doubtful answer; and he prolonged his scrutiny for some minutes. Presently he addressed me - Your name, little girl? Jane Eyre, sir. In uttering these words I looked up: he se...
-Chapter IV. Part 4
This is the state of things I quite approve, returned Mrs. Reed; had I sought all England over, I could scarcely have found a system more exactly fitting a child like Jane Eyre. Consistency, my dea...
-Chapter IV. Part 5
Jane, you are under a mistake: what is the matter with you? Why do you tremble so violently? Would you like to drink some water? No, Mrs. Reed. Is there anything else you wish for, Jane? I assu...
-Chapter V
Five o'clock had hardly struck on the morning of the 19th of January, when Bessie brought a candle into my closet and found me already up and nearly dressed. I had risen half-an-hour before her entran...
-Chapter V. Part 2
The first was a tall lady with dark hair, dark eyes, and a pale and large forehead; her figure was partly enveloped in a shawl, her countenance was grave, her bearing erect. The child is very young ...
-Chapter V. Part 3
Disgusting! The porridge is burnt again! Silence! ejaculated a voice; not that of Miss Miller, but one of the upper teachers, a little and dark personage, smartly dressed, but of somewhat morose ...
-Chapter V. Part 4
I have a word to address to the pupils, said she. The tumult of cessation from lessons was already breaking forth, but it sank at her voice. She went on - You had this morning a breakfast which y...
-Chapter VI
The next day commenced as before, getting up and dressing by rushlight; but this morning we were obliged to dispense with the ceremony of washing; the water in the pitchers was frozen. A change had ta...
-Chapter VI. Continued
Jumping over forms, and creeping under tables, I made my way to one of the fire-places; there, kneeling by the high wire fender, I found Burns, absorbed, silent, abstracted from all round her by the c...
-Chapter VII
My first quarter at Lowood seemed an age; and not the golden age either; it comprised an irksome struggle with difficulties in habituating myself to new rules and unwonted tasks. The fear of failure i...
-Chapter VII. Part 2
I suppose, Miss Temple, the thread I bought at Lowton will do; it struck me that it would be just of the quality for the calico chemises, and I sorted the needles to match. You may tell Miss Smith th...
-Chapter VII. Part 3
Mr. Brocklehurst was here interrupted: three other visitors, ladies, now entered the room. They ought to have come a little sooner to have heard his lecture on dress, for they were splendidly attired ...
-Chapter VIII
Ere the half-hour ended, five o'clock struck; school was dismissed, and all were gone into the refectory to tea. I now ventured to descend: it was deep dusk; I retired into a corner and sat down on th...
-Chapter VIII. Continued
I am afraid I never shall do that. Why? Because I have been wrongly accused; and you, ma'am, and everybody else, will now think me wicked. We shall think you what you prove yourself to be, m...
-Chapter IX
But the privations, or rather the hardships, of Lowood lessened. Spring drew on: she was indeed already come; the frosts of winter had ceased; its snows were melted, its cutting winds ameliorated. My ...
-Chapter IX. Part 2
And where, meantime, was Helen Burns? Why did I not spend these sweet days of liberty with her? Had I forgotten her? or was I so worthless as to have grown tired of her pure society? Surely the Mary A...
-Chapter IX. Part 3
Close by Miss Temple's bed, and half covered with its white curtains, there stood a little crib. I saw the outline of a form under the clothes, but the face was hid by the hangings: the nurse I had sp...
-Chapter X
Hitherto I have recorded in detail the events of my insignificant existence: to the first ten years of my life I have given almost as many chapters. But this is not to be a regular autobiography. I am...
-Chapter X. Part 2
Here a bell, ringing the hour of supper, called me downstairs. I was not free to resume the interrupted chain of my reflections till bedtime: even then a teacher who occupied the same room with me ke...
-Chapter X. Part 3
If J.E., who advertised in the---shire Heraldof last Thursday, possesses the acquirements mentioned, and if she is in a position to give satisfactory references as to character and competency, a situ...
-Chapter X. Part 4
You're not grown so very tall, Miss Jane, nor so very stout, continued Mrs. Leaven. I dare say they've not kept you too well at school: Miss Reed is the head and shoulders taller than you are; and ...
-Chapter XI
A new chapter in a novel is something like a new scene in a play; and when I draw up the curtain this time, reader, you must fancy you see a room in the George Inn at Millcote, with such large figured...
-Chapter XI. Part 2
How do you do, my dear? I am afraid you have had a tedious ride; John drives so slowly; you must be cold, come to the fire. Mrs. Fairfax, I suppose? said I. Yes, you are right: do sit down. S...
-Chapter XI. Part 3
I rose; I dressed myself with care: obliged to be plain - for I had no article of attire that was not made with extreme simplicity - I was still by nature solicitous to be neat. It was not my habit to...
-Chapter XI. Part 4
C'est l ma gouverante! said she, pointing to me, and addressing her nurse; who answered - Mais oui, certainement. Are they foreigners? I inquired, amazed at hearing the French language...
-Chapter XI. Part 5
I found my pupil sufficiently docile, though disinclined to apply: she had not been used to regular occupation of any kind. I felt it would be injudicious to confine her too much at first; so, when I ...
-Chapter XI. Part 6
So I think: you have no ghost, then? None that I ever heard of, returned Mrs. Fairfax, smiling. Nor any traditions of one? no legends or ghost stories? I believe not. And yet it is said the ...
-Chapter XII
The promise of a smooth career, which my first calm introduction to Thornfield Hall seemed to pledge, was not belied on a longer acquaintance with the place and its inmates. Mrs. Fairfax turned out to...
-Chapter XII. Part 2
The ground was hard, the air was still, my road was lonely; I walked fast till I got warm, and then I walked slowly to enjoy and analyse the species of pleasure brooding for me in the hour and situati...
-Chapter XII. Part 3
If you are hurt, and want help, sir, I can fetch some one either from Thornfield Hall or from Hay. Thank you: I shall do: I have no broken bones, - only a sprain; and again he stood up and tried ...
-Chapter XIII
Mr. Rochester, it seems, by the surgeon's orders, went to bed early that night; nor did he rise soon next morning. When he did come down, it was to attend to business: his agent and some of his tenant...
-Chapter XIII. Part 2
He went on as a statue would, that is, he neither spoke nor moved. Mrs. Fairfax seemed to think it necessary that some one should be amiable, and she began to talk. Kindly, as usual - and, as usual, r...
-Chapter XIII. Part 3
I disliked Mr. Brocklehurst; and I was not alone in the feeling. He is a harsh man; at once pompous and meddling; he cut off our hair; and for economy's sake bought us bad needles and thread, with wh...
-Chapter XIV
For several subsequent days I saw little of Mr. Rochester. In the mornings he seemed much engaged with business, and, in the afternoon, gentlemen from Millcote or the neighbourhood called, and sometim...
-Chapter XIV. Part 2
He had been looking two minutes at the fire, and I had been looking the same length of time at him, when, turning suddenly, he caught my gaze fastened on his physiognomy. You examine me, Miss Eyre,...
-Chapter XIV. Part 3
He had deigned an explanation, almost an apology, and I did not feel insensible to his condescension, and would not seem so. I am willing to amuse you, if I can, sir - quite willing; but I cannot in...
-Chapter XIV. Part 4
Repentance is said to be its cure, sir. It is not its cure. Reformation may be its cure; and I could reform - I have strength yet for that - if - but where is the use of thinking of it, hampered, ...
-Chapter XV
Mr. Rochester did, on a future occasion, explain it. It was one afternoon, when he chanced to meet me and Adle in the grounds: and while she played with Pilot and her shuttlecock, he asked me ...
-Chapter XV. Part 2
Adle here ran before him with her shuttlecock. Away! he cried harshly; keep at a distance, child; or go in to Sophie! Continuing then to pursue his walk in silence, I ventured to recall hi...
-Chapter XV. Part 3
But I stayed out a few minutes longer with Adle and Pilot - ran a race with her, and played a game of battledore and shuttlecock. When we went in, and I had removed her bonnet and coat, I took...
-Chapter XV. Part 4
All at once I remembered that it might be Pilot, who, when the kitchen-door chanced to be left open, not unfrequently found his way up to the threshold of Mr. Rochester's chamber: I had seen him lying...
-Chapter XVI
I both wished and feared to see Mr. Rochester on the day which followed this sleepless night: I wanted to hear his voice again, yet feared to meet his eye. During the early part of the morning, I mome...
-Chapter XVI. Part 2
I still stood absolutely dumfoundered at what appeared to me her miraculous self-possession and most inscrutable hypocrisy, when the cook entered. Mrs. Poole, said she, addressing Grace, the serva...
-Chapter XVI. Part 3
It is fair to-night, said she, as she looked through the panes, though not starlight; Mr. Rochester has, on the whole, had a favourable day for his journey. Journey! - Is Mr. Rochester gone anyw...
-Chapter XVII
A week passed, and no news arrived of Mr. Rochester: ten days, and still he did not come. Mrs. Fairfax said she should not be surprised if he were to go straight from the Leas to London, and thence to...
-Chapter XVII. Part 2
The strangest thing of all was, that not a soul in the house, except me, noticed her habits, or seemed to marvel at them: no one discussed her position or employment; no one pitied her solitude or iso...
-Chapter XVII. Part 3
And issuing from my asylum with precaution, I sought a back-stairs which conducted directly to the kitchen. All in that region was fire and commotion; the soup and fish were in the last stage of proje...
-Chapter XVII. Part 4
Will these people remain long, do you think? Perhaps two or three weeks, certainly not more. After the Easter recess, Sir George Lynn, who was lately elected member for Millcote, will have to go u...
-Chapter XVII. Part 5
Blanche and Mary were of equal stature, - straight and tall as poplars. Mary was too slim for her height, but Blanche was moulded like a Dian. I regarded her, of course, with special interest. First, ...
-Chapter XVII. Part 6
I compared him with his guests. What was the gallant grace of the Lynns, the languid elegance of Lord Ingram, - even the military distinction of Colonel Dent, contrasted with his look of native pith a...
-Chapter XVII. Part 7
Yaas, to be sure I do, drawled Lord Ingram; and the poor old stick used to cry out 'Oh you villains childs!' - and then we sermonised her on the presumption of attempting to teach such clever blade...
-Chapter XVIII
Merry days were these at Thornfield Hall; and busy days too: how different from the first three months of stillness, monotony, and solitude I had passed beneath its roof! All sad feelings seemed now d...
-Chapter XVIII. Part 2
On its third rising only a portion of the drawing-room was disclosed; the rest being concealed by a screen, hung with some sort of dark and coarse drapery. The marble basin was removed; in its place, ...
-Chapter XVIII. Part 3
Because, when she failed, I saw how she might have succeeded. Arrows that continually glanced off from Mr. Rochester's breast and fell harmless at his feet, might, I knew, if shot by a surer hand, hav...
-Chapter XVIII. Part 4
It was verging on dusk, and the clock had already given warning of the hour to dress for dinner, when little Adle, who knelt by me in the drawing-room window-seat, suddenly exclaimed - Voil&...
-Chapter XVIII. Part 5
No - stop! interrupted Colonel Dent. Don't send her away, Eshton; we might turn the thing to account; better consult the ladies. And speaking aloud, he continued - Ladies, you talked of going to ...
-Chapter XIX
The library looked tranquil enough as I entered it, and the Sibyl - if Sibyl she were - was seated snugly enough in an easy-chair at the chimney-corner. She had on a red cloak and a black bonnet: or r...
-Chapter XIX. Part 2
I like to observe all the faces and all the figures. But do you never single one from the rest - or it may be, two? I do frequently; when the gestures or looks of a pair seem telling a tale: it...
-Chapter XIX. Part 3
I see no enemy to a fortunate issue but in the brow; and that brow professes to say, - 'I can live alone, if self-respect, and circumstances require me so to do. I need not sell my soul to buy bliss....
-Chapter XX
I had forgotten to draw my curtain, which I usually did, and also to let down my window-blind. The consequence was, that when the moon, which was full and bright (for the night was fine), came in her ...
-Chapter XX. Part 2
Yes, sir. Have you any salts - volatile salts? Yes. Go back and fetch both. I returned, sought the sponge on the washstand, the salts in my drawer, and once more retraced my steps. He stil...
-Chapter XX. Part 3
Oh! I could not forget his look and his paleness when he whispered: Jane, I have got a blow - I have got a blow, Jane. I could not forget how the arm had trembled which he rested on my shoulder: and...
-Chapter XX. Part 4
I flew thither and back, bringing the desired vessels. That's well! Now, doctor, I shall take the liberty of administering a dose myself, on my own responsibility. I got this cordial at Rome, of an ...
-Chapter XX. Part 5
But Mr. Mason seems a man easily led. Your influence, sir, is evidently potent with him: he will never set you at defiance or wilfully injure you. Oh, no! Mason will not defy me; nor, knowing it, ...
-Chapter XXI
Presentiments are strange things! and so are sympathies; and so are signs; and the three combined make one mystery to which humanity has not yet found the key. I never laughed at presentiments in my l...
-Chapter XXI. Part 2
Does that person want you? she inquired of Mr. Rochester; and Mr. Rochester turned to see who the person was. He made a curious grimace - one of his strange and equivocal demonstrations - threw do...
-Chapter XXI. Part 3
I suppose so, sir. And how do people perform that ceremony of parting, Jane? Teach me; I'm not quite up to it. They say, Farewell, or any other form they prefer. Then say it. Farewell, Mr...
-Chapter XXI. Part 4
In each of the sisters there was one trait of the mother - and only one; the thin and pallid elder daughter had her parent's Cairngorm eye: the blooming and luxuriant younger girl had her contour of j...
-Chapter XXI. Part 5
I felt pain, and then I felt ire; and then I felt a determination to subdue her - to be her mistress in spite both of her nature and her will. My tears had risen, just as in childhood: I ordered them ...
-Chapter XXI. Part 6
Is that a portrait of some one you know? asked Eliza, who had approached me unnoticed. I responded that it was merely a fancy head, and hurried it beneath the other sheets. Of course, I lied: it was...
-Chapter XXI. Part 7
She closed her lips. You might have spared yourself the trouble of delivering that tirade, answered Georgiana. Everybody knows you are the most selfish, heartless creature in existence: andIknow y...
-Chapter XXI. Part 8
Dear Mrs. Reed, said I, as I offered her the draught she required, think no more of all this, let it pass away from your mind. Forgive me for my passionate language: I was a child then; eight, nine...
-Chapter XXII
Mr. Rochester had given me but one week's leave of absence: yet a month elapsed before I quitted Gateshead. I wished to leave immediately after the funeral, but Georgiana entreated me to stay till she...
-Chapter XXII. Continued
It was not a bright or splendid summer evening, though fair and soft: the haymakers were at work all along the road; and the sky, though far from cloudless, was such as promised well for the future: i...
-Chapter XXIII
A splendid Midsummer shone over England: skies so pure, suns so radiant as were then seen in long succession, seldom favour even singly, our wave-girt land. It was as if a band of Italian days had com...
-Chapter XXIII. Part 2
Yes, sir; in different ways, I have an affection for both. And would be sorry to part with them? Yes. Pity! he said, and sighed and paused. It is always the way of events in this life, he...
-Chapter XXIII. Part 3
I grieve to leave Thornfield: I love Thornfield: - I love it, because I have lived in it a full and delightful life, - momentarily at least. I have not been trampled on. I have not been petrified. I ...
-Chapter XXIV
As I rose and dressed, I thought over what had happened, and wondered if it were a dream. I could not be certain of the reality till I had seen Mr. Rochester again, and heard him renew his words of lo...
-Chapter XXIV. Part 2
Shall I travel? - and with you, sir? You shall sojourn at Paris, Rome, and Naples: at Florence, Venice, and Vienna: all the ground I have wandered over shall be re-trodden by you: wherever I stamp...
-Chapter XXIV. Part 3
Of course I did. But to the point if you please, sir - Miss Ingram? Well, I feigned courtship of Miss Ingram, because I wished to render you as madly in love with me as I was with you; and I knew ...
-Chapter XXIV. Part 4
Well, never mind that now, I interrupted impatiently; it is enough that all was right. I hope all will be right in the end, she said: but believe me, you cannot be too careful. Try and keep Mr...
-Chapter XXIV. Part 5
Mademoiselle is a fairy, he said, whispering mysteriously. Whereupon I told her not to mind his badinage; and she, on her part, evinced a fund of genuine French scepticism: denominating Mr. Rocheste...
-Chapter XXIV. Part 6
You will give up your governessing slavery at once. Indeed, begging your pardon, sir, I shall not. I shall just go on with it as usual. I shall keep out of your way all day, as I have been accusto...
-Chapter XXV
The month of courtship had wasted: its very last hours were being numbered. There was no putting off the day that advanced - the bridal day; and all preparations for its arrival were complete. I, at l...
-Chapter XXV. Part 2
A puerile tear dimmed my eye while I looked - a tear of disappointment and impatience; ashamed of it, I wiped it away. I lingered; the moon shut herself wholly within her chamber, and drew close her c...
-Chapter XXV. Part 3
I was: I know that; and you hinted a while ago at something which had happened in my absence: - nothing, probably, of consequence; but, in short, it has disturbed you. Let me hear it. Mrs. Fairfax ha...
-Chapter XXV. Part 4
Now, Jane, that is all. All the preface, sir; the tale is yet to come. On waking, a gleam dazzled my eyes; I thought - Oh, it is daylight! But I was mistaken; it was only candlelight. Sophie, I su...
-Chapter XXVI
Sophie came at seven to dress me: she was very long indeed in accomplishing her task; so long that Mr. Rochester, grown, I suppose, impatient of my delay, sent up to ask why I did not come. She was ju...
-Chapter XXVI. Part 2
The ceremony is quite broken off, subjoined the voice behind us. I am in a condition to prove my allegation: an insuperable impediment to this marriage exists. Mr. Rochester heard, but heeded not...
-Chapter XXVI. Part 3
Still holding me fast, he left the church: the three gentlemen came after. At the front door of the hall we found the carriage. Take it back to the coach-house, John, said Mr. Rochester coolly; it...
-Chapter XXVI. Part 4
I heard him go as I stood at the half-open door of my own room, to which I had now withdrawn. The house cleared, I shut myself in, fastened the bolt that none might intrude, and proceeded - not to wee...
-Chapter XXVII
Some time in the afternoon I raised my head, and looking round and seeing the western sun gilding the sign of its decline on the wall, I asked, What am I to do? But the answer my mind gave - Leave...
-Chapter XXVII. Part 2
Sir, I do not wish to act against you, I said; and my unsteady voice warned me to curtail my sentence. Not in your sense of the word, but in mine you are scheming to destroy me. You have as good a...
-Chapter XXVII. Part 3
He recommenced his walk, but soon again stopped, and this time just before me. Jane! will you hear reason? (he stooped and approached his lips to my ear); because, if you won't, I'll try violence....
-Chapter XXVII. Part 4
My bride's mother I had never seen: I understood she was dead. The honeymoon over, I learned my mistake; she was only mad, and shut up in a lunatic asylum. There was a younger brother, too - a comple...
-Chapter XXVII. Part 5
I said this whilst I knelt down at, and unlocked a trunk which contained a brace of loaded pistols: I mean to shoot myself. I only entertained the intention for a moment; for, not being insane, the c...
-Chapter XXVII. Part 6
I mean, - What next? How did you proceed? What came of such an event? Precisely! and what do you wish to know now? Whether you found any one you liked: whether you asked her to marry you; and w...
-Chapter XXVII. Part 7
Impatiently I waited for evening, when I might summon you to my presence. An unusual - to me - a perfectly new character I suspected was yours: I desired to search it deeper and know it better. You e...
-Chapter XXVII. Part 8
I do. Jane (bending towards and embracing me), do you mean it now? I do. And now? softly kissing my forehead and cheek. I do, extricating myself from restraint rapidly and completely. ...
-Chapter XXVII. Part 9
I had already gained the door; but, reader, I walked back - walked back as determinedly as I had retreated. I knelt down by him; I turned his face from the cushion to me; I kissed his cheek; I smoothe...
-Chapter XXVIII
Two days are passed. It is a summer evening; the coachman has set me down at a place called Whitcross; he could take me no farther for the sum I had given, and I was not possessed of another shilling ...
-Chapter XXVIII. Part 2
What a still, hot, perfect day! What a golden desert this spreading moor! Everywhere sunshine. I wished I could live in it and on it. I saw a lizard run over the crag; I saw a bee busy among the sweet...
-Chapter XXVIII. Part 3
I could not bear to return to the sordid village, where, besides, no prospect of aid was visible. I should have longed rather to deviate to a wood I saw not far off, which appeared in its thick shade ...
-Chapter XXVIII. Part 4
My glazed eye wandered over the dim and misty landscape. I saw I had strayed far from the village: it was quite out of sight. The very cultivation surrounding it had disappeared. I had, by cross-ways ...
-Chapter XXVIII. Part 5
Listen, Diana, said one of the absorbed students; Franz and old Daniel are together in the night-time, and Franz is telling a dream from which he has awakened in terror - listen! And in a low voic...
-Chapter XXVIII. Part 6
I must; the rain is driving in - Tell the young ladies. Let me see them - Indeed, I will not. You are not what you ought to be, or you wouldn't make such a noise. Move off. But I must die ...
-Chapter XXIX
The recollection of about three days and nights succeeding this is very dim in my mind. I can recall some sensations felt in that interval; but few thoughts framed, and no actions performed. I knew I ...
-Chapter XXIX. Part 2
The want of house or brass (by which I suppose you mean money) does not make a beggar in your sense of the word. Are you book-learned? she inquired presently. Yes, very. But you've never bee...
-Chapter XXIX. Part 3
You should have waited for my leave to descend, she said. You still look very pale - and so thin! Poor child! - poor girl! Diana had a voice toned, to my ear, like the cooing of a dove. She posse...
-Chapter XXIX. Part 4
I am near nineteen: but I am not married. No. I felt a burning glow mount to my face; for bitter and agitating recollections were awakened by the allusion to marriage. They all saw the embarrassmen...
-Chapter XXX
The more I knew of the inmates of Moor House, the better I liked them. In a few days I had so far recovered my health that I could sit up all day, and walk out sometimes. I could join with Diana and M...
-Chapter XXX. Part 2
Incommunicative as he was, some time elapsed before I had an opportunity of gauging his mind. I first got an idea of its calibre when I heard him preach in his own church at Morton. I wish I could des...
-Chapter XXX. Part 3
Well? I said, as he again paused - proceed. He looked at me before he proceeded: indeed, he seemed leisurely to read my face, as if its features and lines were characters on a page. The conclusio...
-Chapter XXXI
My home, then, when I at last find a home, - is a cottage; a little room with whitewashed walls and a sanded floor, containing four painted chairs and a table, a clock, a cupboard, with two or three p...
-Chapter XXXI. Continued
My cottage is clean and weather-proof; my furniture sufficient and commodious. All I see has made me thankful, not despondent. I am not absolutely such a fool and sensualist as to regret the absence ...
-Chapter XXXII
I continued the labours of the village-school as actively and faithfully as I could. It was truly hard work at first. Some time elapsed before, with all my efforts, I could comprehend my scholars and ...
-Chapter XXXII. Part 2
Miss Oliver already honoured me with frequent visits to my cottage. I had learnt her whole character, which was without mystery or disguise: she was coquettish but not heartless; exacting, but not wor...
-Chapter XXXII. Part 3
While I was eagerly glancing at the bright pages of Marmion (for Marmion it was), St. John stooped to examine my drawing. His tall figure sprang erect again with a start: he said nothing. I looked...
-Chapter XXXII. Part 4
Now, said he, that little space was given to delirium and delusion. I rested my temples on the breast of temptation, and put my neck voluntarily under her yoke of flowers. I tasted her cup. The pil...
-Chapter XXXIII
When Mr. St. John went, it was beginning to snow; the whirling storm continued all night. The next day a keen wind brought fresh and blinding falls; by twilight the valley was drifted up and almost im...
-Chapter XXXIII. Part 2
Mr. Rivers! I interrupted. I can guess your feelings, he said, but restrain them for a while: I have nearly finished; hear me to the end. Of Mr. Rochester's character I know nothing, but the one...
-Chapter XXXIII. Part 3
Well, said he, if you had committed a murder, and I had told you your crime was discovered, you could scarcely look more aghast. It is a large sum - don't you think there is a mistake? No mis...
-Chapter XXXIII. Part 4
Oh, I am glad! - I am glad! I exclaimed. St. John smiled. Did I not say you neglected essential points to pursue trifles? he asked. You were serious when I told you you had got a fortune; and no...
-Chapter XXXIV
It was near Christmas by the time all was settled: the season of general holiday approached. I now closed Morton school, taking care that the parting should not be barren on my side. Good fortune open...
-Chapter XXXIV. Part 2
The eventful Thursday at length came. They were expected about dark, and ere dusk fires were lit upstairs and below; the kitchen was in perfect trim; Hannah and I were dressed, and all was in readines...
-Chapter XXXIV. Part 3
Where does she live, Hannah? Clear up at Whitcross Brow, almost four miles off, and moor and moss all the way. Tell him I will go. I'm sure, sir, you had better not. It's the worst road to t...
-Chapter XXXIV. Part 4
And when I returned, sometimes a good deal tired, and not a little weather-beaten, I never dared complain, because I saw that to murmur would be to vex him: on all occasions fortitude pleased him; the...
-Chapter XXXIV. Part 5
I wrote again: there was a chance of my first letter having missed. Renewed hope followed renewed effort: it shone like the former for some weeks, then, like it, it faded, flickered: not a line, not a...
-Chapter XXXIV. Part 6
If they are really qualified for the task, will not their own hearts be the first to inform them of it? I felt as if an awful charm was framing round and gathering over me: I trembled to hear some ...
-Chapter XXXIV. Part 7
Consent, then, to his demand is possible: but for one item - one dreadful item. It is - that he asks me to be his wife, and has no more of a husband's heart for me than that frowning giant of a rock,...
-Chapter XXXIV. Part 8
Shall I? I said briefly; and I looked at his features, beautiful in their harmony, but strangely formidable in their still severity; at his brow, commanding but not open; at his eyes, bright and dee...
-Chapter XXXV
He did not leave for Cambridge the next day, as he had said he would. He deferred his departure a whole week, and during that time he made me feel what severe punishment a good yet stern, a conscienti...
-Chapter XXXV. Part 2
You utterly misinterpret my words, I said, at once seizing his hand: I have no intention to grieve or pain you - indeed, I have not. Most bitterly he smiled - most decidedly he withdrew his hand ...
-Chapter XXXV. Part 3
Yet he is a handsome fellow. And I am so plain, you see, Die. We should never suit. Plain! You? Not at all. You are much too pretty, as well as too good, to be grilled alive in Calcutta. And a...
-Chapter XXXV. Part 4
He laid his hand on my head as he uttered the last words. He had spoken earnestly, mildly: his look was not, indeed, that of a lover beholding his mistress, but it was that of a pastor recalling his w...
-Chapter XXXVI
The daylight came. I rose at dawn. I busied myself for an hour or two with arranging my things in my chamber, drawers, and wardrobe, in the order wherein I should wish to leave them during a brief abs...
-Chapter XXXVI. Part 2
The suggestion was sensible, and yet I could not force myself to act on it. I so dreaded a reply that would crush me with despair. To prolong doubt was to prolong hope. I might yet once more see the H...
-Chapter XXXVI. Part 3
Yes, ma'am; I lived there once. Did you? Not in my time, I thought: you are a stranger to me. I was the late Mr. Rochester's butler, he added. The late! I seem to have received, with full for...
-Chapter XXXVII
The manor-house of Ferndean was a building of considerable antiquity, moderate size, and no architectural pretensions, deep buried in a wood. I had heard of it before. Mr. Rochester often spoke of it,...
-Chapter XXXVII. Part 2
When you go in, said I, tell your master that a person wishes to speak to him, but do not give my name. I don't think he will see you, she answered; he refuses everybody. When she returned, ...
-Chapter XXXVII. Part 3
He replied not: he seemed serious - abstracted; he sighed; he half-opened his lips as if to speak: he closed them again. I felt a little embarrassed. Perhaps I had too rashly over-leaped conventionali...
-Chapter XXXVII. Part 4
A commonplace, practical reply, out of the train of his own disturbed ideas, was, I was sure, the best and most reassuring for him in this frame of mind. I passed my finger over his eyebrows, and rema...
-Chapter XXXVII. Part 5
Well, whatever my sufferings had been, they were very short, I answered: and then I proceeded to tell him how I had been received at Moor House; how I had obtained the office of schoolmistress, etc....
-Chapter XXXVII. Part 6
Where must I go, sir? Your own way - with the husband you have chosen. Who is that? You know - this St. John Rivers. He is not my husband, nor ever will be. He does not love me: I do not ...
-Chapter XXXVII. Part 7
Some days since: nay, I can number them - four; it was last Monday night, a singular mood came over me: one in which grief replaced frenzy - sorrow, sullenness. I had long had the impression that sin...
-Chapter XXXVIII - Conclusion
Reader, I married him. A quiet wedding we had: he and I, the parson and clerk, were alone present. When we got back from church, I went into the kitchen of the manor-house, where Mary was cooking the ...









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