books



previous page: The Terriers. A History And Description Of The Modern Dogs Of Great Britain And Ireland | by Rawdon B. Lee
  
page up: Dog Books
  
next page: How To Train Dogs And Cats | by Frederick H. Erb, Jr

The Dogs Of Great Britain, America, And Other Countries. Their Breeding, Training, and Management in Health and Disease | by John Henry Walsh (Stonehenge)



Every lover of the dog has hailed with lively satisfaction the reproduction of Stonehenge's Great Works in the United States. Mr. Walsh does not always express himself in the smoothest terms, but what he writes is to the point The reader feels that he is explaining or advising what he knows to be true from actual experience, that he can safely purchase one animal or administer medicine to another in accordance with his directions. The composition of his latest book, the "Dogs of the British Islands," shows a marked improvement over the of "The Dog in Health and Disease," though the directions for breeding, rearing, etc, and for the treatment of the diseases, are fuller and more satisfactory in the matter. The present volume very properly, therefore, combines descriptions of dogs selected from both works, while the matter pertaining to the breeding of dogs, management in disease, etc., is produced almost bodily from Stonehenge's first book.

TitleThe Dogs Of Great Britain, America, And Other Countries. Their Breeding, Training, and Management in Health and Disease
AuthorJohn Henry Walsh (Stonehenge)
PublisherOrange Judd Company
Year1906
Copyright1906, Orange Judd Company
AmazonThe Dogs Of Great Britain, America And Other Countries

Comprising all the essential parts of the two standard works on the dog

Together With Chapters By American Writers.

New And Enlarged Edition.

With Over One Hundred Illiustrations.

The Dogs Of Great Britain America And Other Countr 2The Dogs Of Great Britain America And Other Countr 3
-Publishers' Preface
For fifty years, Stonehenge, by which name Mr. J. H. Walsh is known in both Continents, has made the dog a constant study. More than twenty years ago the Messrs Longman, of London, selected him to r...
-Introductory
Every lover of the dog has hailed with lively satisfaction the reproduction of Stonehenge's Great Works in the United States. Mr. Walsh does not always express himself in the smoothest terms, but what...
-Book I. The Natural History, Zoological Classification, And Varieties Of The Dog. Chapter I. Origin
General Characteristics. - Habitat. - Varieties. - F. Gutter's Divisional Arrangement. - Arrangement Adopted By Stonshengb. From the earliest times we have reason to believe that the dog has been...
-General Characteristics
In every variety the dog is more or less endowed with a keen sight, strong powers of smell, sagacity almost amounting to reason, and considerable speed, so that he is admirably adapted for all purpose...
-Habitat
In almost every climate the dog is to be met with, from Kamt-schatka to Cape Horn, the chief exception being some of the islands in the Pacific Ocean; but it is only in the temperate zone that he is t...
-Varieties Of The Dog
The varieties of the dog are extremely numerous, and, indeed, as they are apparently produced by crossing, which is still had recourse to, there is scarcely any limit to the numbers which may be descr...
-F. Cuvier's Divisional Arrangement
I. Matins Characterized by head more or less elongated; parietal bones in-sensibly approaching each other; condyles of the lower jaw placed in a horizontal line with the upper molar teeth, exemplif...
-Chapter II. Wild And Half-Reclaimed Dogs Hunting In Packs. The Dingo
It is upon the great similarity between these wild dogs and the wolf or fox, that the supposition is founded of the general descent of the domesticated dog from either the one or the other. After exam...
-The Dhole
The native wild dog of India, called the Dhole, resembles the Dingo in all but the tail, which, though hairy, is not at all bushy. The following is Captain Williamson's description, extracted from his...
-The Pariah
This is the general name in India for the half-reclaimed dogs which swarm in every village, owned by no one in particular, but ready to accompany any individual on a hunting excursion. They vary in ap...
-The Ekia, Or Wild African Dog
The native dogs of Africa are of all colors, black, brown, and yellow, or red; and they hunt in packs, giving tongue with considerable force. Though not exactly wild, they are not owned by any individ...
-The North And South American Dogs
A great variety of the dog tribe is to be met with throughout the continent of America, resembling in type the dingo of Australia, but appearing to be crossed with some of the different kinds introduc...
-Chapter III. Domesticated Dogs. The Rough Scotch Greyhound And Deerhound
This breed of dogs is, I believe, one of the oldest and purest in existence, but it is now rapidly becoming extinct, being supplanted in public estimation, for coursing purposes, by the English greyho...
-The Smooth Greyhound
This elegant animal appears to have existed in Britain from a very early period, being mentioned in a very old Welsh proverb, and a law of King Canute having precluded the commonalty from keeping him....
-The Smooth Greyhound. Part 2
Hence it is important to bear this in mind, and to take care not to overdo this characteristic. In all cases, the more the development is increased behind the ears, the higher will be the courage; and...
-The Smooth Greyhound. Part 3
The hind quarter is entirely overlooked in the rhymes above-mentioned, but it is of the greatest importance nevertheless, being the chief element of progression. First of all, we should insist upon a ...
-The Irish Greyhound, Or Wolf-Dog
This fine animal is now, I believe, extinct, though there are still pome gentlemen who maintain that they possess the breed in all its pristine purity of blood. They are much larger than the deer-houn...
-The Matin
The French matin is not a very distinct dog, comprehending an immense variety of animals, which in England would be called lurchers, or sheep dogs, according to the uses to which they are put. The hea...
-The Hare-Indian Dog
The Hare-Indian dog inhabits the country watered by the Mac-kenzie River and the Great Bear Lake of America, where it is used to hunt the moose and reindeer by sight, aided occasionally by its powers ...
-The Albanian Dog
The Albanian dog is said to stand about 27 or 28 inches high, with a long pointed muzzle, powerful body, strong and muscular limbs, and a long bushy tail, carried like that of the Newfoundland dog. Hi...
-The Grecian Greyhound
This elegant animal is somewhat smaller than the English dog. The hair is longer and slightly wavy, the tail also being clothed with a thin brush of hair. This is supposed to be the same breed as the ...
-The Russian Greyhound
This variety of the greyhound hunts well by scent, and, being at the same time fast and stout, he is used for the destruction of the wolves and bears which inhabit the Russian forests, and also for co...
-The Turkish Greyhound
A small and almost hairless dog, of the greyhound kind, is met with in Turkey, but it is not common in that country, and 1 have never seen a specimen or even a good portrait of it ...
-The Persian Greyhound
Is an elegant animal, beautifully formed in all points, and resembling the Italian in delicacy of proportions. In Persia he is used for coursing the hare and antelope, as well as sometimes the wild as...
-The Italian Greyhound
This little dog is one of the most beautifully proportioned animals in creation, being a smooth English greyhound in miniature, and resembling it in all respects but size. It is bred in Spain and Ital...
-The Bloodhound
The name given to this hound is founded upon his peculiar power of scenting the blood of a wounded animal, so that, if once put on his trail, he could hunt him through any number of his fellows, and w...
-The Foxhound
The modern foxhound is one of the most wonderful animals in creation, which is probably owing to the great pains that have been bestowed upon him for the last two or three centuries. Nu-merous instanc...
-The Harrier
The true harrier is a dwarf southern hound, with a very slight infusion of the greyhound in him. Hence he is more throaty than the foxhound, and has also more ear, with a broader head, more fully deve...
-The Beagle
The true beadle, like the old harrier, is now almost entirely displaced by dwarf specimens of the foxhound, or by crosses with it in varying proportions. Still there are some packs left, and a good ma...
-The Otterhound
No hound which is now kept in Great Britain resembles the southern hound so much as this, the difference being only in the rough, wiry coat, which has been obtained by careful breeding, to enable them...
-The Terrier
The terrier, as used for hunting, is a strong, useful little dog, with great endurance and courage, and with nearly as good a nose as the beagle or harrier. From his superior courage, when crossed wit...
-The Terrier. Part 2
The Dandie Binmont breed of terriers, now so much celebrated, was originally bred by a farmer of the name of James Davidson at Hindalee, in Roxburghshire, who, it is generally believed, got his dogs f...
-The Terrier. Part 3. The Skye Terrier. The Fox Terrier
The Skye Terrier is remarkable for his long weasel-shaped body, and for his short, fin-like legs, added to which he has a long rather than a wide head, and also a neck of unusual dimensions, so that w...
-The Dachshund, Or German Badger Dog
The Dachshund is perhaps one of the most ancient forms of the domesticated dog. The fact is that he has for centuries represented an isolated class between the hound and the terrier, without being mor...
-Chapter IV. Domesticated Dogs. The Modern English Pointer
This is now one of the most beautiful of all our sporting dogs, dividing with the setter the admiration of all those who enjoy the pleasures attending on the use of the gun. The points desirable in...
-The Portuguese Pointer
Resembles the Spanish in general form, but is furnished with a bushy stern, and looks like a cross with the old-fashioned spaniel ...
-The Dalmatian And Danish Dogs
The Dalmation dog is a handsome, well-formed dog, standing about 24 or 25 inches high, and resembling the pointer in his shape, but usually having his ears cropped, as shown in the engraving. He is be...
-Setters
The English Setter. - The Black And Tan or Gordon Setter. - The Irish Setter. The setter is, without doubt, either descended from the spaniel, or both are offshoots from the same parent stock. Orig...
-The English Setter
Since the first publication of the articles on the various breeds on dogs in The Field, during the years 1865-6, the strain of English setters known by the name of Laverack, from the gentleman who b...
-The English Setter. Continued
Dan himself was a very fine upstanding and handsome dog, and his stock might therefore be expected to resemble him, while the Laverack dogs are nearly all heavy and lumbering, and the bitches, though ...
-The Black-Tan Setter Or Gordon Setter
The black-tan setter, until the institution of shows, was commonly called Gordon, from the fact that the Dukes of Gordon had long possessed a strain of setters of that color, which had obtained a hi...
-The Irish Setter
This breed has long been known to sportsmen throughout Great Britain as a good one, especially in point of stamina, and a class was set apart for it at Birmingham in 1860, a year before the black and ...
-The Field Spaniel
The field Spaniel is distinguished from the toy dog by his propensity to hunt game, and by his size and strength, which are sufficient to enable him to stand the work which is required in making his w...
-The Field Spaniel. Continued. Sussex Spaniel. Cocker Spaniel
The Sussex Spaniel differs from the Clumber in shape and color, as well as in his questing, his note being full and bell-like, though sharp. In hight and weight there is not much difference, nor is ...
-The Water Spaniel
Water Spaniels are commonly said to have web-feet, and this point is often made a ground of distinction from other dogs, but the fact is that all dogs have their toes united by membranes in the same w...
-Chesapeake Bay Dog
The earliest accounts that we have of the above mentioned dog date back to the year 1807, when the ship Canton, of Baltimore, fell in at sea with an English brig in a sinking condition, bound from N...
-Chapter V. Pastoral Dogs. The English Sheep-Dog
There are so many different breeds of the English Sheep-dog that it is difficult to describe him. He has a sharp muzzle, medium-sized head, with small and piercing eyes; a well-shaped body, formed aft...
-The Collet
One of the most beautiful and useful of all dogs is the Scotch sheep-dog or colley, excellent engravings of which are given, pp. 125-128. With a fine muzzle he combines an intelligent-looking and rath...
-The German Sheep-Dog
Is a small-sized dog, with bushy tail carried over the back, small muzzle, and shaggy coat, which is generally black or light fawn. His manner is brisk and affectionate, and his tractability is great,...
-The Pomeranian Or Spitz-Dog
Within the last twenty years this dog has been largely imported from Germany and France into England, in addition to those bred in that country; but, nevertheless, he has not become so general a favor...
-The Newfoundland
This most valuable animal is of three very different kinds, viz.: 1. The true Newfoundland; 2. The large, loose-made, and longhaired variety, known as the Large Labrador; and 3. The small, compact, an...
-The Esquimaux Dogs
These dogs are the only beasts of burden in the northern part of America and the adjacent islands, being sometimes employed to carry materials for hunting or the produce of the chase on their backs. A...
-Chapter VI. Watch Dogs, House Dogs, And Tot Dogs
Bulldog. - English Mastiff. - Mount St. Bernard. - Thibet Dog. - Poodle. - Maltese Dog. - Lion Dog. - Shock Dog. - Tot Spaniels. - Tot Terriers. - The Pug Dog. - Italian Greyhound. The peculiarity ...
-The Bulldog
F. Cuvier has asserted that this dog has a brain smaller in proportion than any other of his congeners, and in this way accounts for his assumed want of sagacity. But, though this authority is deserve...
-The Mastiff
There is every reason to suppose that this is an indigenous breed, like the bulldog, for though the Cuban mastiff closely resembles it, yet the latter is to all appearances crossed with the bloodhound...
-The Mount St. Bernard Dog
Closely allied to the mastiff, but resembling the Newfoundland in temper and in his disposition to fetch and carry, is the Mount St. Bernard breed, until lately confined to the Alps and the adjacent c...
-The Thibet Dog
This animal, as before remarked, resembles the English mastiff in general appearance, and, being also put to the same use, the two may be said to be nearly allied. According to Mr. Bennet, he is bred ...
-The Poodle
The engraving given on this page represents the poodle as he is generally to be seen, shaved in part, so as to resemble the lion in having a mane; the tip of his tail having a tuft left on it. He is b...
-Maltese Dog
This beautiful little dog is a Skye terrier in miniature, with, however, a far more silky coat, a considerably shorter back, and a tail stiffly curved over the hip. Fig. 33. - MALTESE DOG, FIDO...
-The Lion Dog
This toy dog appears to be crossed between the poodle and the Maltese dog, being curly like the former, but without his long ears and square visage. He is now very seldom seen anywhere, and is not pri...
-The Shock Dog
This dog also is now almost unknown. But formerly he was very generally kept as a toy dog. He is said to have been a cross between the poodle and small spaniel, both of which varieties he resembled in...
-Toy Spaniels
Two breeds are known and recognized under this head, namely, the King Charles and the Blenheim spaniels, the former being slightly the larger of the two, and by most people considered the more handsom...
-The Pug
This curly-tailed and pretty little toy dog was out of fashion in England for some years, but has recently come again into such vogue that a good pug will fetch from 100 to 200 dollars. The British br...
-Toy Terriers
These are of the various breeds described under the head of the terrier, but of smaller size than the average, and with great attention paid to their color and shape. The smooth English terrier, not e...
-Chapter VII. Crossed Breeds
Retriever. - Bull-Terrier. Although many of the breeds which have been enumerated in the preceding chapters were most probably the produce originally of crosses between distinct varieties, yet at p...
-The Retriever
In speaking of the retriever, it is generally understood that the dog for recovering game on land is meant, the distinct kind known as the water spaniel being already alluded to on page 118. With 163 ...
-The Bull-Terrier
Many of our smooth terriers are slightly crossed with the bull-dog, in order to give courage to bear the bites of the vermin which they are meant to attack. When thus bred, the terrier shows no eviden...
-Book II. The Breeding, Rearing, Breaking, And Management Of The Dog, In-Doors And Out
And dogs may be instanced which have got good stock from all sorts of mares and bitches. Yet in opposition to this may be instanced the numbers which have had great opportunities for snowing their goo...
-Axioms For The Breeder's Use
But it may be asked, - What then are the principles upon which breeding is to be conducted? To this, in many of the details, no answer can be given which can be relied on with certainty. Nevertheless,...
-In-And-In Breeding
The questions relating to in-and-in breeding and crossing are of the greatest importance, each plan being strongly advocated by some people, and by others as strenuously opposed. Like many other pract...
-Duration Of Heat
The duration of the period of heat in the bitch is about three weeks, during the middle week of which she will generally take the dog; but about the eleventh or twelfth day from the first ivuiiifencem...
-Management Of The Bitch In Whelp
When it is clearly ascertained that the bitch is in whelp, the exercise should be increased and carried on freely until the sixth week, after which it should be daily given, but with care to avoid st...
-Preparation For Whelping
The best mode of preparing a place for the bitch to whelp in is to nail a piece of old carpet over a smooth boarded floor, to a regular bench, if in a sporting kennel; or on a door or other flat pie...
-Healthy Parturition
During whelping, the only management required is in regard to food and quiet, which last should as far as possible be enjoined, as at this time all bitches are watchful and suspicious, and will destro...
-The Management Of Whelps In The Nest
Until weaned, the management of dogs does not require much care beyond the feeding of the mother, and the necessity for removing a part when the numbers are too great for her strength to support. For ...
-Choice Of Whelps
In choosing the whelps in the nest which are to be kept, most people select on different principles, each having some peculiar crotchet to guide himself. Some take the heaviest, some the last born; ot...
-The Foster-Nurse
The foster nurse need not be of the same breed as the puppies which she is to suckle; a smooth-skinned bitch is superior for the purpose to one with a rough coat, which is apt to harbor fleas, and in ...
-Feeding Before Weaning
The food of whelps before weaning should be confined at first to cow's milk, or, if this is very rich, reduced with a little water. It is better to boil it, and sweeten it with a little fine sugar, as...
-Choice Of Place For Whelping
The whelping-place, up to the third week, may be confined to a square yard or two, floored with board as already described. After the third week, when the puppies begin to run about, access should ...
-Removal Of Dew-Claws, Etc
Before weaning, any cropping which is intended, whether of the dew-claw or tail, should be practised, but the ears should be left alone until the third or fourth month, as they are not sufficiently de...
-Weaning
When weaning is to be commenced, which is usually about the fifth or sixth week, it is better to remove the puppies altogether, than to let the bitch go on suckling them at long intervals. By this tim...
-Necessity For Warm And Dry Lodging
All puppies require a dry lodging, and in the winter season it should also be a warm one. Greyhound whelps, up to their third or fourth month, are sometimes reared in an artificial temperature, either...
-Feeding
The feeding of puppies is all important, and, unless they have plenty of food sufficiently nourishing to allow of a proper growth, it is impossible that they should become what they might be if fed wi...
-Exercise
Exercise is necessary at all ages, but the fully developed dog may be confined for some little time without permanent injury, the formation of his feet and the texture of his bones and muscles being t...
-Home Rearing Versus Walking
When one or two puppies only are to be reared, they may be readily brought up at home, excepting in towns or other confined situations, where due liberty and a proper amount of sun and air can not be ...
-The Food Of Puppies At Home Or "At Walk," And Its Proper Preparation
Whether at home or out, puppies require the same kind of food, and the more regularly this is given as to quantity and quality, as well as the times of feeding them, the more healthy they will be, and...
-The Food Preparation Of Puppies At Home Or "At Walk". Continued
The broth should always be used, as there are important elements of nutrition dissolved in it, which are absent in the boiled flesh. It is therefore necessary to make the puddings or stirabout with it...
-General Treatment
During the whole time of growth, the only general management required is, first, a habit of obedience, the dog being taught his kennel name, to follow at heel, and to lead. Some breeds require more th...
-Choice Of Puppies After Weaning Them
Puppies of all kinds vary in form so much between the weaning time and the period of full growth, that there is great difficulty in making a choice which shall be proved by subsequent events to be on ...
-Cropping, Branding, And Rounding
If terriers are to be cropped, the beginning or end of the fourth month is the best time for this; and, before sendmg out to walk. hounds are branded with the initials of the master or of the hunt,...
-Chapter III. Kennels And Kennel Management
Greyhound Kennels. - Foxhound Kennels. - Pointer Kennels. - Kennels Fob Single Dogs. - House Dogs. Between the kennels intended for the various kinds of dogs, and the methods of management therein,...
-Greyhound Kennels
Every kennel intended for greyhounds should be thoroughly pro-tected from the weather, and should have the yard covered in as well as the lodging-house. The plan for the kennel intended to rear puppie...
-Foxhound And Harrier Kennels, Etc
Unlike the greyhound kennel in many respects, that which we are now considering must be adopted for from thirty to a hundred couples of hounds, and the accommodation should therefore be more extensive...
-Kennel Benches
My benches are made of inch pine, cut into widths of three inches, and nailed half an inch apart to two transverse pieces, to which hinges arc fixed to connect the bench with a board six inches wide,...
-Pointers And Setters
These dogs do not require a covered yard, and may be treated in all respects like hounds, the only difference being in regard to numbers. More than three or four brace should not be kept together if i...
-Chapter IV. Breaking And Entering
The Entering Of The Greyhound And Deerhound. - Of Foxhounds And Harriers. - Breaking The Pointer And Setter. - The Retriever (Land And Water). - The Spaniel. - The Vermin Dog. With the exception of...
-The Entering Of The Greyhound And Deerhound
Whether for public or private coursing, the greyhound should not be suffered to course a hare until he is nearly at maturity; but as the bitches come to their growth before the dog3, they may be enter...
-The Entering Of Foxhounds And Harriers
The first thing to be done with hound puppies, when they come into kennel, is to get them used to their new masters and to their names, which ought to have been given them at walk. For some little t...
-The Breaking Of The Pointer And Setter
The following observations on the breaking of these dogs are believed to embody the general practice of good breakers: As the method is the same for each kind, whenever the word pointer is used, it is...
-Words Of Command Used To The Pointer And Setter
1. To avoid breaking fence - Ware fence. 2. To come back from chasing cats, poultry, hares, etc. - Ware chase. 3. To come to heel, and remain there - To heel, or HeeL 4 To gallop forwar...
-Words Of Command Used To The Pointer And Setter. Part 2
In order to complete the education of the pointer in ranging or beating his ground, it is not only necessary that he should quarter it, as it is called, but that he should do it with every advantag...
-Words Of Command Used To The Pointer And Setter. Part 3
There is a wonderful faculty in some breeds of discovering a body-scent at long distances, while they have no perception of the foot-scent, and this is the quality which ought to be most highly prized...
-How to Teaching Backing To A Dog
When a dog has acquired the merely instinctive property already described, he is said to be steady before, and may be used alone or single-handed without any further education; but when he is to be ...
-Breaking To Retrieve
Retrieving, in my opinion, should be invariably committed to a dog, specially kept for that purpose; but, as this is not the universal practice, it will be necessary to say a few words on this subject...
-The Entering And Breaking Of The Covert Spaniel
The breaking of all spaniels should be commenced as early as possible, as they are naturally impetuous, and require considerable restraint to keep them near enough to the shooter, while they are at wo...
-The Entering And Breaking Of Vermin Dogs
Terriers are entered to vermin with great facility, and require very little breaking, unless they are intended to be used with ferrets. Then they must be broken to let these animals alone, as they are...
-Chapter V. The Use of The Dog In Shooting
Grouse And Partridge (Quail) Shooting. - Snipe And Woodcock Shooting. - Wild-Fowl Shooting. - Shoal-Water Fowl. - Deep* Water Fowl. - Hare Hunting. - Deer Hunting. The dogs used in aid of the gun a...
-Grouse And Partridge (Quail) Shooting
North America is exceeded by no other country in the world in the number and varieties of its game birds, and among these the grouse of different species and the true partridge - the so-called quail -...
-Snipe And Woodcock Shooting
The first game shooting after the winter is over, is that of the English or Wilson's snipe As soon as the frost is out of the ground, snipe may be hunted in low wet places and meadow swamps. Here they...
-Woodcock Shooting
Custom or law has authorized the beginning of cock shooting on the 1st day of July in most of our States, but it is too early, both on account of the heat of the weather and the condition of the birds...
-Wild-Fowl Shooting
The shooting of water-fowl is a sport attended with too much labor, fatigue and exposure to render it very attractive to any but experienced and eager sportsmen, who have perhaps become sated with the...
-Shoal-Water Fowl
The species of fowl which frequent shoal water have been already mentioned; but a short description of the principal varieties may be of interest. ...
-The Mallard
This is a handsome bird, 24 inches in length to the end of the tail when full grown; the extent of the wings is 86 inches, and the weight is about 3 pounds. The male is marked as follows: The bill, gr...
-The Blue-Winged Teal
This is a small, but richly flavored bird, considered to be inferior to none except the canvas-back and the red-head. They are the first to move southward in the fall, and are found in vast numbers in...
-Deep-Water Fowl
The Canvas-Back Duck - This species is the finest flavored of all wild fowl. Its food in those localities where it is taken in perfection, consists of the roots of the wild celery, which give to its f...
-Hare Hunting
We have no rabbits in America, although the animals called rabbits - but really hares - are sufficiently plentiful to afford good sport with dogs, in the fall and early winter. It may be of interest t...
-Deer Hunting
The finest of all American hunting consists, perhaps with out exception, in taking deer, either on the run followed by hounds, by stalking or still hunting, or by hunting the game with packs of well t...
-Game In The Far West
While Buffalo have almost wholly disappeared from the regions traversed by the great public thoroughfares, and other kinds of game have perceptibly diminished in some quarters, there is no immediate d...
-Book III. The Diseases Of The Dog And Their Treatment. Chapter I. Peculiarities In The Anatomy And Physiology Of The Dog
The Muscular System The muscles of the dog have nothing remarkable about them, except that they are renewed and wasted faster than in most 13 animals. This has passed into a proverb, and should be ...
-The Skeleton, Including The Teeth
In the skeleton of the dog and in that of the horse, as well as of all other animals remarkable for their speed, there is a peculiar characteristic of the chest which deserves to be noticed. A narrow-...
-Teeth Of The Dog At Various Ages
The incisors are somewhat remarkable in shape, having three lobules at their edges resembling a fleur-de-lis (Figs. 43-44). Next to these come the canine teeth or tusks, and then the molars, which var...
-Chapter II. The Remedies Suited To The Dog, And The Best Means of Administering Them. Alteratives
These are medicines which are given with a view of changing an unhealthy into a healthy action. We know nothing of the mode in which the change is produced, and we can only judge of them by the result...
-Anodynes
Anodynes are required in the dog chiefly to stop diarrhoea, which is a very common disease with him. Sometimes also they are used for the purpose of relieving spasm. Opium is so little objectionable i...
-Antispasmodics
Antispasmodics are useful in allaying cramp or spasm, but, as in the case of Alteratives, we do not know how they act. The chief ones are opium, ether, spirits of turpentine, and camphor, prescribed a...
-Aperients
Aperients, opening medicines, or purges, by which several names this class of medicines is known, are constantly required by the dog, though it is a great mistake to give them when they are not absolu...
-Astringents
Astringents produce contraction in all living tissues with which they are placed in apposition, either directly or by means of absorption in the circulation. Of these, opium, gallic acid, alum, bark, ...
-Blisters
Blisters are rarely used for the dog, because unless he has a proper muzzle on he will lick them off, injuring himself very materially. Sometimes, however, as in inflammation of the lungs, they are ab...
-Caustics
This name is given to substances which either actually or potentially destroy the living tissue. The actual cautery is an iron heated in the fire, the potential of some chemical substance, such as cor...
-Charges
Charges are plasters which act chiefly by mechanical pressure, being spread on while hot, and then covered with tow. They are not much used among dogs, but in strains they are sometimes beneficial, as...
-Cordials
Warm stimulating stomachics are so called. They may be given either as a ball or a drench. Cordial ball: 38. - Powdered caraway seeds, 10 to 15 grains. Ginger, 3 to 5 grains. Oil of cloves, 2 dr...
-Diuretics
Medicines which act on the secretion of urine are called diuretics. They are either employed when the kidneys are sluggish, to restore the proper quantity, or to increase it beyond the natural standar...
-Embrocations
These external applications, otherwise called liniments, are extremely useful in the dog, for strains, or sometimes to relieve muscular inflammation, or chronic rheumatism of the joints Mustard, ammon...
-Emetics
Emetics are very commonly used in the diseases of the dog, and sometimes act very beneficially; but they have a tendency to weaken the stomach, and should therefore be used with caution. If not freque...
-Expectorants, Or Cough Medicines
The action of these remedies is to promote the flow of mucus, so as to relieve the congestion of the air passages. Common cough bolus: 46. - Ipecacuanha in powder, 1/2 to 1 1/2 grain. Powdered r...
-Fever Medicines
Fever medicines reduce fever by increasing the secretions of urine and perspiration, and by reducing the action of the heart to some extent. Common fever powder: 49. - Nitre in powder, 3 to 5 gr...
-Clysters
Clysters are extremely useful in the dog, which is liable to constipation from want of exercise, and in that case is mechanically bound. A pint of warm water, in which some yellow soap has been dissol...
-Lotions
Lotions, called Washes, are intended either to reduce the temperature in inflammation of the surface to which they are applied or to brace the vessels of the part. Cooling lotion for bruises: 53...
-Ointments
By means of lard, wax, etc., various substances are mixed up so as to be applied to wounds, chiefly to keep out the air. A good ointment for old sores: 57. - Yellow basilicon, Ointment of nit...
-Stomachics
The name describes the use of the remedies, which are intended to give tone to the stomach. Stomachic bolus: 59. - Extract of gentian, 6 to 8 grains. Powdered rhubarb, 2 to 3 grains. Mix, and...
-Styptics
Styptics are remedies to stop bleeding. In the dog the vessels seldom give way externally, but internally the disease is very frequent, either in the form of a bloody flux, or bloody urine, or bleedin...
-Tonics
Tonics permanently increase the tone or vigor of the system, being particularly useful in the recovery from low fever. Tonic pill: 62 - Sulphate of quinine, 1 to 3 grains. Extract of hemlock, 2 ...
-Worm Medicines
By this term we are to understand such substances as will expel worms from the intestines of the dog, their action being either poisonous to the worm itself, or so irritating as to cause them to evacu...
-Administration Of Remedies
Some considerable tact and knowledge of the animal are re-quired, in order to give medicines to the dog to the best advantage. In the first place, his stomach is peculiarly irritable, and so much unde...
-The Dog's System Resembles That Of Man
The effects of remedies on the dog are nearly the same as on man, so that any one who understands how to manage himself may readily extend his sphere of usefulness to the dog. On the other hand, horse...
-Mode Of Giving A Bolus Or Pill
If the dog is small, take him on the lap, without harshness, and if inclined to use his claws, tie a coarse towel round his neck, letting it fall down in front, which will muffle them effectually; the...
-Mode Of Drenching The Dog
If a small quantity only is to be given, the dog's head being held, the liquid may be poured tarough the closed teeth by making a little pouch of the cheek. This, however, is a tedicus pro cess, as th...
-Chapter III. Fevers And Their Treatment
Simple Ephemeral Fever, Or Cold. - Epidemic Fever, Or Influ-Enza. - Typhus Fever, Or Distemper. - Rheumatic Fever. - Small Pox. - Sympathetic Fever. The dog is peculiarly liable to febrile attacks,...
-Simple Ephemeral Fever
Simple Ephemeral Fever, known as a common cold, is ushered in by chilliness, with increased heat of surface, a quick pulse, and slightly hurried breathing. The appetite is not as good as usual; the ...
-Influenza
The symptoms of influenza at first closely resemble those of ephemeral fever, but as they depend upon some peculiar condition of the air which prevails at the time, and as they are more persistent, th...
-Typhus Fever, Or Distemper
It is now generally admitted that this disease is similar to typhus fever in man, and should be treated in much the same manner. The essence of the disease is some poison admitted from without, or ...
-Typhus Fever, Or Distemper. Continued
The bowels may be known to be seized when there is a violent purging of black offensive matter, often tinged with blood, and sometimes mixed with patches or shreds of a white leathery substance, which...
-Rheumatic Fever
One of the most common diseases in the dog, is rheumatism some form, generally showing itself with very little fever, but sometimes being accompanied with a high degree of fever. The frequency of this...
-Small-Pox
I reproduce Mr. Youatt's description of small-pox in dogs: In 1809, there was observed, at the Royal Veterinary School at Lyons, an eruptive malady among the dogs, to which they gave the name of small...
-Sympathetic Fever
This term is applied to the fever which comes on either before or after some severe local affection, and is, as it were, eclipsed by it. Thus in all severe inflammations there is an accompanying fever...
-Chapter IV. Inflammations
Definition Of Inflammation Inflammation consists in a retardation of the flow of blood through the small vessels; an increased action of the large ones is required to overcome it. When external and...
-Hydrophobia, Rabies, Or Madness
This disease has been classed among the inflammations. The symptoms are chiefly as follows: The first is a marked change of temper; the naturally cheerful dog becoming waspish and morose, and the bold...
-Tetanus
Resembling rabies in some degree, tetanus differs from it in the absence of any affection of the brain, the senses remaining perfect to the last. It is not common with the dog. It is generally produce...
-Turnside
Turnside is more frequently seen in the dog than tetanus, still it is by no means common. It consists in some obscure affection of the brain, resembling the gid of sheep, and probably results from t...
-Inflammations Of The Eye
Ophthalmia, or simple inflammation of the eyes, is very com-mon in dogs, especially daring the latter stages of distemper, when the condition of this organ is often seemingly, though not really, hopel...
-Canker, Or Inflammation Of The Ear
Many dogs, especially of sporting breeds, contract an inflammation of the membrane or skin lining of the ear, from high feeding generally, and exposure to the weather. This causes irritation, and the ...
-Inflammation Of The Mouth And Teeth
Dogs fed on strongly stimulating food, are very apt to lose their teeth by decay, and also to suffer from a spongy state of the gums attended with a collection of tartar about the roots of the teeth. ...
-Ozaena
Ozaena is an inflamed condition of the lining membrane of the nose, producing an offensive discharge from the nostrils. This is very common in the pug dog, and also more or less in toy spaniels. There...
-Laryngitis And Bronchocele
Laryngitis is inflammation of the top of the wind-pipe, where there is a very narrow passage for the air, and consequently where a slight extra contraction caused by swelling is necessarily fatal. Whe...
-Inflammation Of The Lungs
The organs of respiration consist of an external serous and an internal mucous membrane, united together by cellular tissue. Each of these is the seat of a peculiar inflammation (pleurisy, pneumonia, ...
-Spasmodic Asthma
What is often called asthma in the dog is nothing more than a chronic form of bronchitis, very common among petted toy dogs or house dogs, which do not have much exercise. The symptoms and treatment a...
-Phthisis, Or Consumption
Though very often fatal among highly-bred animals, phthisis or consumption has not been noticed by writers on dog diseases, neither Blain, Youatt, nor Mayhew making the slightest allusion to it I have...
-Gastritis, Or Inflammation Of The Stomach
This affection is, like all others of the same kind, either acute or chronic. The former very rarely occurs except from poison, or highly improper food, which has the same effect. The symptoms are a c...
-Inflammation Of The Liver
This is one of the most common of the diseases to which sport-ing dogs are liable, in consequence of exposure to cold and wet It causes congestion of the liver, which runs into inflammation. Dogs d...
-Inflammation Of The Bowels
Four varieties of inflammation of the bowels are met with, viz.: 1, acute inflammation of the peritonaeal coat; 2, spasms of the muscular coat, attended with congestion or inflammation, and known as c...
-Inflammation Of The Kidneys And Bladder
The former of these affections, which may be known by a great scantiness of urine, and evident pain in the loins, is not very common in the dog, but it does occasionally occur. The only treatment like...
-Skin Diseases
Nearly all skin diseases are due to neglect in some form. In the dog, they arise either from improper management, as in the case of blotch or surfeit, or from the presence of parasites, as in mang...
-Chapter V. Diseases Accompanied By Want Of Power
Morea. - Shaking Palsy. - Fits. - Worms. - General Dropsy Or Anasaroa. Inflammation is attended by increased action of the heart and arteries. The above class of diseases is, on the contrary, accompan...
-Chorea
Chorea, or St. Vitus's dance, may be known by the spasmodic twitches which accompany it, and cease during sleep. In slight cases the spasm is a mere drop of the head and shoulder, or sometimes of the ...
-Shaking Palsy
This resembles chorea in its nature, but it is incessant, except fluting sleep, and attacks the whole body. The same remedies may be applied, but it is an incurable disease, though not always destroyi...
-Fits
Fits are of three kinds: 1st, those arising from irritation, espe cially in the puppy, and known as convulsive fits: 2ndly, those connected with pressure on the brain, and being of the nature of apopl...
-Worms
Worms are a fertile source of disease in the dog, destroying every year more puppies than does distemper itself; and, in spite of every precaution, attacking the kennelled hound or shooting dog, as we...
-Tape-Worms
Tape-worms in the dog are of five kinds, of which the Tsrnia solium and Bothriocephalic latus are common to man and the dog. The other kinds are not readily distinguished from these two, and all are n...
-The Kidney-worm (Gigas)
The Kidney-worm (gigas), Professor Owens says, inhabits the kidney of che dog, as well as that of the wolf, otter, raccoon, glut ton, horse, and bull, (see fig. 50). It is generally of a dark blood-c...
-General Dropsy
General Dropsy consists, in serum infiltrated into the cellular membrane, beneath the skin of the whole body, as shown by swelling without redness, and pitting on the pressure of the finger being re...
-Chapter VI. Diseases Arising From Mismanagement Or Neglect. Poverty Of Blood
When puppies are reared in densely populated parts of cities, or even in the country where they are crowded together in large numbers, they are weakly in constitution; their blood is pale, from being ...
-Rickets And Enlarged Joints
By rickets is understood a soft and weak condition of the bones, in which the lime is deficient; the gelatine comprising their framework having no proper support, they bend in any direction which the ...
-Indigestion
Among the most common consequences of improper feeding and neglect of exercise is indigestion, attended by its usual concomitant, constipation. If moderate starvation does not soon restore the stomach...
-Chapter VII. Diseases And Accidents Requiring Surgical Aid
Tumors Bronchocele, or Goitre, is very common among house pets, showing itself in a large and rather soft swelling in the front of the throat. The treatment consists in rubbing in iodine outward ly...
-Unnatural Parturition
When, says Mr. Youatt, the time of parturition arrives, and there is evident difficulty in producing the foetus, recourse should be had to the ergot of rye, given every hour or half-hour, according to...
-Puerperal Fits
Nature proportions the power and resources of the mother to the wants of her offspring. In her wild undomesticated state she is able to suckle her progeny to the full time; but, in the artificial stat...
-Accidents And Operations
Cuts, tears, and bites, unless they are very extensive, and there-fore likely to occupy a long time in healing, are better left to themselves, the dog's tongue being the best healing remedy. But when ...
-Standard Books Published By Orange Judd Company
New York Chicago 52 & 54 Lafayette Place Marquette Building BOOKS sent to all parts of the world for catalog price. Discounts for large quantities on application. Correspondence invited. Brief d...
-Standard Books Published By Orange Judd Company. Part 2
Landscape Gardening By F. A. Waugh, professor of horticulture, university of Vermont. A treatise on the general principles governing outdoor art; with sundry suggestions for their application in th...
-Standard Books Published By Orange Judd Company. Part 3
Forest Planting By H. Nicholas Jarchow, LL. D. A treatise on the car of woodlands and the restoration of the denuded, timberlands on plains and mountains. The author has fully described those Europ...
-Standard Books Published By Orange Judd Company. Part 4
The New Onion Culture By T. Greiner. Rewritten, greatly enlarged and brought up to date. A new method of growing onions of largest size and yield, on less land, than can be raised by the old plan. ...









TOP
previous page: The Terriers. A History And Description Of The Modern Dogs Of Great Britain And Ireland | by Rawdon B. Lee
  
page up: Dog Books
  
next page: How To Train Dogs And Cats | by Frederick H. Erb, Jr