Paragraph 146. Where two hems overlap at a corner, it is often desirable to remove some of the extra thicknesses of material.

Figure 52.

Figure 52.

This may be done by mitering the corner. To do this, lay the hem the width desired, fold and crease in place. The corner will form a square, as in No. 1, Figure 52. Keeping the hems creased, lift the corner of the material and pull it up until it forms a V, as in No. 2, Figure 52; crease sharply on the diagonal lines thus formed. Cut this piece off slightly above the crease (allowing 1/8" above crease for turning under the raw edges) so the ends of the seams will meet at an angle of 45 degrees, thus forming a perfect mitered corner. Turn under the raw edge of the upper hem and fold it over the other one, making it form a perfect diagonal across the corner, as in No. 3, Figure 52. Baste in place with even basting (Par. 103) and hem neatly (Par. 114).

Mitering A Corner Of Lace

Figure 53.

Figure 53.

Paragraph 147. In sewing on lace around a corner it is necessary either to gather the lace on the inside edge sufficiently to keep it from drawing on the outer edge, or to remove this fullness by miter-ing. Lace may be mitered at almost any angle, but since the methods are so similar, directions are given here only for a square corner. To do this, draw one edge of the lace together until a square corner is formed on the oposite edge, leaving a triangular piece extending the same as in mitering a corner of material explained in Paragraph 146. When this triangular piece is cut off, the edge of the lace will form a perfect miter, or an angle of 45 degrees. Before cutting off this triangular or V shaped piece, baste the lace together along the diagonal line running along one edge of the V to the corner; trim the lace to within 1/16" of the basting and buttonhole (Par. 136) the edges together on the wrong side, as shown in Figure 53.

Another very satisfactory way to do this is to buttonhole along the line of basting threads on the wrong side and trim off the lace close to the buttonhole stitches. This method makes a narrower seam than the first.

Lace may be mitered any place where it is sewed around a corner, as in handkerchiefs, collars, square table covers or dresser scarfs. The fullness in the edge of the lace in lace yokes is often removed by mitering.