New England Aster (Aster Novae-Anglae)

New England Aster (Aster Novae-Anglae) is one of the largest of the genus, its stem attaining heights of from 2 to 6 feet; it is also one of the most common and most popular species.

The stem is stout, branched and rather rough. The leaves are soft, hairy, lance-shaped and clasp the stem by a somewhat heart-shaped base. The flowers are in a broad corymb at the top of the stem. They are quite large, measuring about an inch across; the 30 to 40 narrow rays are of a purplish color, often quite bright.

This species is not, as might be judged from its name, a native of New England, only, but is common from Me. to Minn, and southwards, blooming from August to October, frequenting dry ground.

Smooth Aster. Aster laevis.

Smooth Aster. Aster laevis.

Smooth Aster (Aster Laevis)

Smooth Aster (Aster Laevis) is a handsome species having a smooth, stout stem, quite branching, usually covered with a whitish bloom and growing from 2 to 4 feet high. The flowers are in lovely terminal clusters, each blossom measuring about an inch across; they are usually light violet blue in color, although color is very variable with all Che so-called blue asters; each disk is surrounded by 15 to 30 rays. The leaves are nearly smooth-edged, lanceolate, clasping the stem with a distinct heart-shaped base. The Smooth Aster is abundant from Me. to Minn, and southwards, growing in dry soil and blooming in September and October.

Smooth Aster (Aster Laevis)

Smooth Aster (Aster Laevis) is a handsome species having a smooth, stout stem, quite branching, usually covered with a whitish bloom and growing from 2 to 4 feet high. The flowers are in lovely terminal clusters, each blossom measuring about an inch across; they are usually light violet blue in color, although color is very variable with all Che so-called blue asters; each disk is surrounded by 15 to 30 rays. The leaves are nearly smooth-edged, lanceolate, clasping the stem with a distinct heart-shaped base. The Smooth Aster is abundant from Me. to Minn, and southwards, growing in dry soil and blooming in September and October.

New York Aster (Aster Novi-Belgii)

New York Aster (Aster Novi-Belgii) is one of the very commonest of the "blue asters." The stalk is slender, very branchy and grows from 1 to 3 feet in height. The leaves are commonly narrowly lanceolate but are very variable; they slightly clasp the stem with their bases. The numerous flower heads are a trifle more than an inch across, the yellowish center being surrounded by 15 to 24 lilac or blue-violet rays. This species abounds from Newfoundland to Florida and perhaps west to the Miss. Valley. It blooms in September and October.

Purple-Stemmed Aster (Aster Puniceus)

Purple-Stemmed Aster (Aster Puniceus) is more widely distributed and perhaps as abundant as the last species. It is tall and branching, the stem growing from 2 to 7 feet in height. The stalk is brownish purple and is stout and rough-hairy. The leaves are large, oval, with a tapering point, rough above and hairy on the midrib below, coarsely but sparingly toothed. The flowers grow very profusely in terminal clusters. The centers are dull yellow and the 20 to 24 rays, light violet blue or white. Common from N. B. to Manitoba and southwards.

A. Heart leaved Aster.

A. Heart-leaved Aster.

Aster cordifolius.

B. Panicled Aster.

Aster paniculatus.