Trying to make an entire trousseau at home is a mistake. Ready made garments often can be bought cheaper than they can be made at home. Time, however, may be spent profitably altering and trimming them. The trousseau should consist mainly of lingerie; frocks and gowns soon become unfashionable.

Trying to make an entire trousseau at home is a mistake. Ready-made garments often can be bought cheaper than they can be made at home. Time, however, may be spent profitably altering and trimming them. The trousseau should consist mainly of lingerie; frocks and gowns soon become unfashionable.

Trousseaux are more sensibly planned in these days than they were a generation back. Then it was considered indispensable that the bride should be furnished with so many gowns that she could not possibly wear them all before some became unfashionable. But now it is considered sufficient if the supply is adequate to the requirements of a few months.

This applies, however, to the visibilities only of the marriage trousseau. The lingerie must still be abundant. The fashion of underwear changes less rapidly than that of gowns, coats, and hats. Enough lingerie for a couple of years, therefore, must be included in the list for the trousseau.

The cost must, of course, be relative to the position of the bride, and her family resources. It has also to bear some relation to the number of daughters in the family. Suppose there are six sisters. The father cannot be expected to spend as much on the trousseau of one of them as if she were his only girl. On the other hand, if there are several daughters, and if they are clever with fingers and sewing machines, they may lessen, to some extent, the cost of the trousseau by making some of it at home.

The cost of the trousseau, then, may be anything from 5 to 10,000. The latter amount represents the outlay for more than one American bride who has entered our British Peerage by the matrimonial gate. The former sum might suffice for the girl who becomes the wife of an artisan or of a junior clerk.

That a trousseau has occasionally been provided for less is proved by the case of the lady who married the late J. Mcneill Whistler, the famous American artist. Mr. Labouchere relates that meeting her one day shortly before the date fixed for the wedding, he remarked, " You must be very busy about your trousseau." " No," she replied; ' my trousseau is a very simple one. All I shall buy is a new toothbrush and a new sponge."

Here are given estimates for two trousseaux at different prices. That at one hundred guineas is suitable for the daughter of a professional man or a private gentleman, who is going to marry into a position equal to her own in life.

Should a girl, however, be engaged to a man of much superior rank something more would be expected in the matter of gowns, as she would probably be going more into society and associating with women who dress richly and well. The father of such a bride would find himself called upon to make a special effort, and to supplement the following list in some particulars.

Hundred-Guinea Trousseau

S.

d.

Wedding-gown

11

11

0

Wedding veil, tulle

2

2

0

Wedding handkerchief

0

15

0

Going-away gown ......

7

7

0

Two evening gowns at 5 5s. each

10

10

0

Two afternoon gowns, one a tailor-made, at 4 4s., the other a reception dress at 5s. . .

9

9

0

Travelling coat................

5

5

0

Cloth or satin coat

3

3

0

Four hats, various prices

5

0

0

Rest gown

3

3

0

Dressing gown

1

10

. 0

Shoes, six pairs, various prices ..

3

15

0

Gloves, veils, neckwear, etc.

3

10

0

Umbrella, 21s.; sunshade, 14s. 6d.

1

15

6

Blouse and slips

5

0

0

Six nightgowns, trimmed with lace and embroidery, at 10s. 6d.

3

3

0

Six nightgowns, less elaborate, at 5S. 6d. .. ........

1

13

0

Six summer combinations, at

2

5

0

Six winter combinations, at 10s. 6d.........

3

3

0

Six pair knickers, summer, at 7s. 6d..........

2

5

0

Six pair knickers, winter, at 9s. 6d...........

2

17

0

Six camisoles, at 4s. 6d.....

1

7

0

Three camisoles, at 6s.

0

18

0

Three evening camisoles, at 7s. 6d.

1

2

6

One corset..........

1

5

0

One evening corset ......

1

5

0

Three white petticoats, with lace or embroidery, at 12s. 6d.

1

17

6

One white petticoat, more elaborate

0

18

6

One moirette petticoat

0

15

6

One silk afternoon petticoat

1

5

0

One silk evening petticoat

1

10

0

Six pair of stockings, winter, at 2s. 6d...........

0

15

0

Six pair of stockings, summer, at 2s. 6d...........

0

15

0

Six pair of evening stockings, at 2s. 6d...........

0

15

0

One dozen handkerchiefs

0

15

0

One dozen handkerchiefs . .

0

10

6

104

16

0

No mention has been made of motor costume, of riding habit, of furs, of sporting dress, such as an outfit for fishing in Norway, shooting in Scotland, or for travelling in far lands. Any or all of these must be supplied according to circumstances. Furs are often given as wedding presents. The cost of the other things must be added to that of the trousseau.

The motor has practically revolutionised dress. It has almost banished what used to be known as the house-gown, and it has encouraged the short skirt at the expense of the long. Only in the evenings is there any permanence of fashion for the trained skirt. Even the rest-gown is abbreviated, as compared with the proportions of its predecessor, the tea-gown.

These changes affect the trousseau by diminishing its cost in one direction, and adding to it in another, since motor costume. including bonnets and veils, which quickly soil, owing to the dust of the roads, adds considerably to the expenditure.