Our readers may remember that a few years ago Dr. Thompson, of Maryland, advertised for sale the original plant of a weeping dogwood, found by him in that State. The plant was purchased by one of our nurserymen for propagation and sale, and from a plant raised from this original the present illustration has been taken. The photograph was taken in June, when in full leaf, so as to show the rich heavy character of its foliage. It is unique among weeping trees in this, that while all the lateral branches are as pendulous as a weeping beech, the leading shoot is always perfectly straight, thus making no necessity for grafting high up on a stock, as in other weeping trees. The plant illustrated is from a graft put in the common dogwood near the ground. No attempt has been made to trim or tie this plant. The growth is wholly natural and the plant now about eight feet high.

WEEPING DOGWOOD.

WEEPING DOGWOOD.

Probably no weeping plant has so many good points. Belonging to Cornus florida, it will no doubt be hardy almost into the Arctic regions. The straight leading shoot, by which it will rise direct from the ground, has already been noted. The large white floral bracts, for which this dogwood is so famous, will appear in a three or four year old plant, succeeded by its clusters of holly-like berries later in summer; and finally the brilliant red of the autumn leaves, which makes even the common form so valuable in American scenery, are all part of the character of this weeping variety.